Thursday, December 14, 2017

Massive Elephant Herd Leaves People In Lurch In Balasore

Balasore: A massive elephant herd comprising of over 90 pachyderms of various sizes left the residents of Nilagiri area in a state of panic today, after sneaking into the district from neighbouring Mayurbhanj in the state.

The herd was seen roaming in the Gopalpur forest, destroying paddy crops in the nearby farmlands, on their way. Comprising of both jumbos and calves the herd which though remained away from the human habitat, people still spent sleepless night yesterday fearing wild elephant attack.

The herd returned to the Gopalpur forest after district forest officials reached the village and tried to disperse them this morning.

Expressing their sense of fear, locals in the area have claimed that it is for the first time that an elephant herd of such a big size have been seen in the area.

The forest department sources on the other hand have said that all precautionary measures are being taken before any effort of driving the pachyderms away taking into account their numbers. It added, the pachyderms have entered into the district from Dalaki forest under Betonati Forest Range of Mayurbhanj.

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Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Two wild jumbos electrocuted in Assam

According to reports, local villagers had found the carcass of the elephants at Chamdhara village near Kaliabor.

A forest department official said that the cause of death is yet to be ascertained.

The forest official said that local villagers use electric wires at their paddy field to protect it from wild elephants.

The jumbos were out in search for food, where and it is possible they got electrocuted.

On November 13 last, two elephants died when they allegedly got electrocuted in upper Assam’s Sivsagar and Golaghat districts.

The countrywide elephant census conducted this year reported that, around 10,139 elephants have found in North East India.

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India’s elephant population decreases by 10% to 27,312

The environment ministry released the result of the Elephant Census 2017, which pegged the elephant population at 27, 312 across 23 states

New Delhi: The population of India’s national heritage animal— the elephant—has dipped in the country in the last five years. The union environment ministry released the result of the Elephant Census 2017, which pegged their population at 27, 312 across 23 states.

This means the population has decreased by about 3,000, compared to last census in 2012. In 2012, the population of Asian elephant, an endangered and protected species in India, was estimated at around 30,000 (29,391-30,711) and in 2007 it was estimated at about 27,670 (27,657-27,682).

As per the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the population of Asian elephants was about 41,410 to 52,345 and of that India alone accounts for nearly 60%.

The population was recorded in the following geographical regions: northern, east-central, northeast, and southern.

Among the states, the highest population was recorded in Karnataka (6,049), followed by Assam (5,719) and Kerala (3,054). As far as regions are concerned, the highest population was in southern region (11,960) followed by the northeast region (10,139), east-central region (3,128) and northern region (2,085).

Techniques like direct count, indirect count, waterhole methods and elephant distribution mapping were used for the estimation.

The ministry, however, claimed that the dip in their population is due to use of scientific and uniform methods, which are more credible. It also pointed out that this is only a preliminary report and would be followed by final report in next few months.

“The present report presents results only from the direct count method. This is ongoing work that would require more inputs from the states, detailed analyses, and interpretation… Compiling more accurate population structure data from photographs would require several months of work,” said the report.

It added that the “the results presented here should therefore be interpreted with caution” and at this “stage, comparisons should not be made between results from the 2017 census and the earlier 2012 census”.

The census was released by union minister for environment, forest and climate change (MoEFCC), Dr Harsh Vardhan, on the occasion of World Elephant Day (12 August).

He also launched a nationwide campaign, “Gaj Yatra”, to protect elephants, which will cover 12 elephant range states.

While addressing the gathering, Vardhan urged people to prepare a strategy for a more even distribution of the elephant population in all the states of the country and emphasized that an attempt must be made to bring an end to the man-animal conflict.

He also called for a broader base movement for conservation of elephants.

Experts present at the release of census emphasized the importance of preserving elephant corridors to protect and conserve the species.

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Man Injured In Elephant Attack

Angul: A man was injured after being attacked by a wild elephant at Jhiliripali village under Dimaria panchayat in Angul district on Tuesday morning.

The victim was identified as Meenaketan Sahu.

According to reports, Sahu had gone out of his house to a nearby pond to answer nature’s call when he came across the lone elephant that strayed into the human settlement. Though he tried to flee the area, the animal chased and attacked him with its trunk and fled the area.

Hearing his cries, some locals rushed to the spot and admitted him to a local hospital for treatment.

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A Relieved Elephant Raises Her Trunk to Thank the Workers Who Rescued Her Baby from a Mud Hole

A tiny baby elephant fell into a deep mudhole in Urulanthanni, Kerala, India and couldn't escape despite the unsuccessful efforts of the herd. The next day, a group of compassionate workers from the Forest Department tirelessly dug at the hole until the calf was able to break free and rejoin the group.

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Ban use of captive elephants for demolition; use machines: Animal activist

Union Environment, Forests and Climate Change Minister Harsh Vardhan has been approached by animal welfare activist and Master Trainer in animal welfare of Animal Welfare Board of India, Azam Siddiqui, to ban use of captive elephants to force-demolish 'illegal' structures.

The animal rights activist said, "As someone who understands elephants and is trained in its management, I seek your valued intervention to put an immediate ban on any further usage of captive elephants from being engaged in such an act. The demolition drive may be allowed by use of human force or machines such as bulldozers."

An animal welfare activist has asked Union Environment, Forests and Climate Change Minister Harsh Vardhan to ban use of captive elephants to force-demolish “illegal” structures. The demand came after the Assam government had used the captive elephants to demolish illegal settlements by encroachers in Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary on Monday. In his petition submitted to Vardhan on Tuesday, Master Trainer in animal welfare of Animal Welfare Board of India, Azam Siddiqui said that the practice of using captive elephants to demolish structures which include semi-concrete/concrete and bamboo with roof tops made of corrugated iron sheets is extremely dangerous and can cause serious harm to both the animal and the public.

“Forcing an elephant into this herculean task also does amount to cruelty under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. Since it is noticed that the animal is forced by the mahout to pull down the structures by being goaded by the ankush,” Siddiqui noted. Pointing out that the Assam Forest Department and the officials have time and again been seen repeating this offence in 2002, in 2011 and now in 2017 despite experts advising them not to do so, the Animal Welfare Activist said, “It is quite likely that the animal may injure itself in the process and perhaps even go berserk, this danger has never ever been calculated by the Assam Forest Department.”

Moreover, he said that the resistance provided by the public can cause injury or harm to the animal which in turn could go berserk causing harm to itself and precious human lives.

Seeking the intervention of the Union Minister, Siddiqui said, “As someone who understands elephants and is trained in its management, I seek your valued intervention to put an immediate ban on any further usage of captive elephants from being engaged in such an act. The demolition drive may be allowed by use of human force or machines such as bulldozers.”

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Angry elephant chases forest staff for 200 metres

This is the terrifying moment a tusker chased away forest workers after they tried to get a closer look at the animal.

The forest staff were working away in Ooty in Tamil Nadu, India when they became aware of a herd of elephants nearby.

They continued working but soon discovered two elephants were lurking in the bushes.

Forest staff were working away in Ooty in Tamil Nadu, India when they became aware of a herd of elephants nearby.

Deciding to capture the moment, one of the workers pulled out their phone and began recording.

Footage shows the two elephants looking through a patch of grass as the workers' truck slowly moves closer towards them.

As they creep along slowly, it looks as if the elephants aren't aware that the workers are watching them.

A tusker suddenly turns around after becoming disturbed and starts running towards them

However, a tusker suddenly turns around and starts running towards them.

Terrified, the workers begin to drive off but elephant continues to run after them for 200 metres.

Eventually, it gives up and the workers manage to get away safely back to their base.

They later returned to the forest to continue their jobs.

Terrified, the workers begin to drive off but elephant continues to run after them for 200 metres.

Eventually, it gives up and the workers manage to get away safely back to their base.

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Monday, December 11, 2017

Man held with tusks

A 28-year-old man was arrested today after he was found in possession of two tusks, which he had allegedly removed from a dead elephant a week ago near Gudalur, some 80 km from here, officials said.

Forest department officials noticed that the tusks of the 10-year-old elephant, which was found dead in Devala, were missing and launched a search to nab the poachers.

On information that one Manikandan was reportedly trying to sell the tusks, officials nabbed him this morning, officials said.

The officials recovered the tusks, which was buried in a farm and produced Manikandan before a local court, which remanded him to custody.

A search is on for the owner of the farm, they said.

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Elephants damage crops in Sundargarh

Rourkela: A big herd of elephants has become a cause of headache for the forest department and the villagers in the interior areas of Sundargarh district.

The herd is trying to push into the thickly populated Rourkela division. Sometimes it comes as close as Rajgangpur border. However, these animals have been driven far from the areas of human settlement as the forest department and villagers are on high alert.

"There are more than 60 elephants of various sizes in the herd and the herd is one of the biggest," said Sundargarh divisional forest officer Arun Kumar Mishra. The herd is from the Jharsughda division. It managed to sneak through Bamra range and is causing havoc in Kutra and its nearby areas, the forest official said.

The herd is roaming around the area for the past one month. It is eating away the vegetables grown in the Bamra, Kutra and Badgaon regions. "Since these animals are been driven away by the villagers there, they sneaked into our range near Kutra. At present it is roaming in our area," Mishra said.

The problem for the forest department is that the jumbos unite despite getting separated during drives. "They are very clever and have good memory so once they are separated they again comeback to maintain the size of the herd," said Libnus Kerketta, a ward member. On Thursday, they attacked the farmhouse of one Dinesh Ekka, and ruined the entire plantation of banana and papaya. Besides, they also finished the paddy and cow feed kept in his farmhouse. "The size of the herd is so massive, the villagers who are involved in drives are getting scared," Kerketta said.

Mishra further said they were planning a massive drive in a day or two to drive the herd away. "Fortunately so far there is no human loss only crops and vegetables have been damaged, but the villagers are very angry."

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Elephant Who Spent Decades Giving Rides Has Best Response To Freedom

For the past 40 years, Priyanka the elephant has spent her days giving people rides through the city streets of India with a heavy seat strapped to her back.

With constant pressure on her spine and no shelter from the sun, Priyanka walked and walked every day with an aching back and feet burnt from the hot asphalt roads.

The 44-year-old elephant was also regularly rented out for parades, which forced her to march long distances among noisy spectators. As she walked along the routes, people would often startle her with loud music and firecrackers or even try to climb onto her as she passed.

Like many elephants taken from the wild to be used for entertainment, Priyanka never knew what it was like to be part of an elephant family — until now.

Wildlife SOS India learned of Priyanka’s plight over a year ago and has tracked her movements ever since — knowing that it was only a matter of time before the team could bring her to safety from her owner, who was keeping her illegally. The organization planned her rescue over the course of months, and the chance to save her finally presented itself last week.

“We immediately mobilized a rescue team to assist the local Forest Department in the area to conduct a daring seizure operation along with the local police department,” the rescue wrote in an update. “But even perfect opportunities can easily go wrong, and we had to keep everything on the down low for the safety of Priyanka and the amazing team that had gone out to rescue her.”

The team successfully seized Priyanka, though her previous owner tried to have the elephant returned to him — despite not having any valid ownership documents. But a few days later, with paperwork and permissions finalized, Priyanka was clear to go to her new home at Wildlife SOS’ Elephant Conservation and Care Center.

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Trenches threaten Wayanad ecosystem

KOZHIKODE: Indiscriminate digging of trenches in Wayanad, meant to keep rampaging elephants from damaging cultivation, has led to depletion of critical water resources in the forested hill district, which is already witnessing decreased rainfall.

A six-month long study conducted by the state department of Soil Survey and Soil Conservation has found that 70% of the springs at the source points of Kabini river and one third of its contributing streams have dried up, with elephant proof trenches (EPTs) being one of the main reasons.

The district soil conservation officer said this has affected the lateral movement of water vital for the longevity of springs and water flow in the contributing streams of the basin.
Elephant trenches drain rivulets, choke rivers

In an unintended fallout, the nearly 400km long elephant proof trenches (EPTs) dug up around the Wayanad forests to keep marauding jumbos at bay are turning 'river killers' and affecting the water security of the hill district.

The role of EPTs in the depletion of streams and springs has emerged in the six-month-long study conducted by the state department of soil survey and soil conservation. The study had found that 70% of the springs in the source points of the Kabani river and one third of its contributing streams have dried up and the EPT's had a role in that, apart from other environmental factors. "The elaborate network of EPTs has disrupted the natural water flow in the drainage basins.

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Friday, December 08, 2017

Elephant calf enter Coimbatore home. No Meals, they depart

An elephant and a younger calf entered a home in Coimbatore’s Periyanaickenpalayam on Thursday night time

An elephant and a younger calf entered a home in Coimbatore’s Periyanaickenpalayam neighbourhood on Thursday night time in the hunt for meals. Their hunt for meals was caught on a CCTV digicam which reveals the 2 animals loitering round what seems to be the courtyard of the home. Within the video, the grownup elephant enters the yard with the younger one shut behind. The 2 head in direction of a shed searching for meals. With no meals, the elephants go away the home roughly a minute later after inspecting the environment. There have been no studies of any harm, information company ANI stated.

Nevertheless, not all human-elephant encounters have been with out violence as this one. India is house to the most important inhabitants of Asian elephants on the earth. Sadly, a minimum of 70% of these haven’t got a viable habitat. Consequently, they usually come face-to-face with people in states like Assam, Tamil Nadu, Odisha and Karnataka. On common, 100 people are killed yearly in India. Elephants too have been killed, typically brutally, within the battle. In a photograph that went viral, a mom and child elephant have been set on fireplace and attacked by an offended mob in Bankura district of West Bengal. The photograph titled “hell is right here” by Biplab Hazra received him the wildlife photographer of the 12 months award.

In one other instance, a Kerala man’s movie-like stunt, for Fb views, to climb an elephant’s trunk landed him within the hospital.

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Udalguri village finds ‘banana solution’ to elephant menace

GUWAHATI: Desperate villagers along the India-Bhutan border in Udalguri district have found a way to stop wild elephant herds from devastating their agricultural lands and homesteads — by arranging banana plants for the jumbos to feed on. However, forest officials and conservation experts say while this might be an effective short-term solution to the problem of man-elephant conflicts, it might lead to bigger problems in the long run.

Udalguri district is one of the areas in the state most prone to human-elephant conflicts, with there being casualties on both sides every year. Elephant herds from Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh often descend on the villages here with the onset of the paddy harvest season.

At least five elephants and six persons have been killed here this year alone. While most human casualties come about when herds trample on villagers, elephants die by poisoning, electrocution or falling into deep ditches.

A local conservation activist, Nabajyoti Baruah, along with other villagers, are on a drive to grow and collect banana plants here. “In the early part of November, when a 100-strong elephant herd came to the Hatigor area, people were really scared. The herd broke into smaller herds and dispersed in different directions. The area is mostly tea garden area, and elephants started entering into narrow alleys of villages in search of food. We thought why not arrange banana plants so that elephants can feed on them without venturing into the villages,” Baruah said.

Francis Tanti, a resident of Hatigor, said people from different areas have come on board with the plan and started collecting banana plants in large numbers. “Baruah, along with others, started collecting banana plants from different parts of Udalguri on tractors. The banana plants were put at a place far from human settlements. After feeding on the banana plants, the elephants left the area. This strategy helped,” Tanti said.

However, forest officials and other conservation experts are not enthusiastic about this strategy, saying it might increase conflicts if the elephants get used to ‘pre-arranged fodder’.

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Elephant safaris to start in south Bengal

Elephant safaris are common in north Bengal. Now they are going to start in south Bengal too. The safaris on elephant-back are going to be organised for tourists visiting Joypur in Bankura district for the five-day 'Elephant Corridor' Joypur Mela, from December 15. The name refers to the fact that the forest there is a major corridor, or path of migration, for wild elephants. Besides wild elephants, the pristine forest around Joypur is home to deer, peacocks and bears, to see all of which is the safari programme being held. The fair is just two years old, but is steadily becoming a major tourist attraction. The idea behind the fair is to make people aware of the history, tradition, and art and culture of the region, lying bang in the middle of a major elephant corridor. The Forest Department is organising these safaris, for which ten elephants are being trained under the guidance of experienced mahouts.

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India captors beat young elephant with canes breaking its hind leg

In a disturbing and shocking event in India, a video has garnered viral status as a young elephant is shown being savagely beaten by its India captors to be used in the tourism trade.

According to the Daily Mail, regular beatings are common in India by elephant keepers to remind the animals to be subservient and frightened so that the animals will obey in tourist activities of riding, painting, football, tightrope walking and other close contact activities. The torture, known in India as “ketti azhikkal” is used as elephants come out of their mush period – mating season and the increase in testosterone in the animals, to “remind them who is in charge.”

In the shocking footage, the young elephant’s front leg is tied to a tree; three men continually beat the animal with canes until the elephant collapses to the ground. Even then, the torturers don’t stop lashing the animal; that is until their weapons snap in half.

In a response to the cruelty and online outrage after the release of the video, the animal charity organization, Save the Asian Elephants (STAE) issued the following statements:

“The elephant was beaten so badly it’s leg was broken, as were all the sticks used in the beating. The whole of humanity is shamed by this depravity to an innocent creature and a highly endangered species. It does all it can to obey yet the beatings continue.”

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Thursday, December 07, 2017

Appeal to barricade open wells

The Wildlife Society of Odisha has urged the state government to barricade open wells with a view to saving animals, especially the elephants, which fall into them and die.

A large number of elephants and other wildlife animals are falling into open wells, and in many cases, this leads to their death, said society secretary Biswajit Mohanty on Monday.

On October 29, an elephant calf died after falling into an open well at Madhapur under Athmalik forest division in Angul district. The carcass was discovered after two to three days. On November 3, another jumbo calf fell into an open well near Naharkanta under the Tangi forest range in Khurda district. The calf survived as it was rescued.

On November 27, an adult female elephant that had fallen into an open well at Tapursingha under the Athmalik forest division was rescued after a marathon 10-hour operation. But unfortunately, the same elephant fell into another open well a kilometre away the next day. It died before being rescued. The society had carried out a survey, which indicated that since December 12, 2012 there had been 63 open well incidents, in which 85 animals had fallen. While 42 of them were elephants, the rest were other animals.

On October 26, two bear cubs fell into an open well near Badadeula in Koraput municipality limits. Both were rescued, but one died and the other got badly injured.

While most of the 85 animals were rescued, 12 animals, including seven elephants, died. Other wild animals, which had fallen into open wells, included sloth bear, rattle, pangolin, spotted and barking deer, wild boar, monitor lizard, jungle cat and fishing cat, the survey indicated.

"We have already urged the state forest and environment minister to take measures to address the problem through memorandums, along with a proposal to barricade all such wells in the elephant habitats," Mohanty said.

"We are disappointed that despite our repeated pleas since four years, no action has been taken to barricade these open wells," Mohanty further said.

According to the wildlife society, not more than Rs 1.5 crore is needed to barricade 5,000 open wells in the state. "This is a small amount considering the fact that the state has about 2,000 elephants," Mohanty said.

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Jumbo rampage in Digboi village

A herd of 30 wild elephants, that came out from Upper Dehing reserve forest and entered Balijan and Borjan village, has created panic for the past month, destroying crops.

The village falls under Digboi forest division in Tinsukia district.

"I have lost 300 bighas of crops to rampaging elephants. Every year, the elephants come from the reserve forest and spark terror in our village. We have been spending sleepless nights for several days now," said Arun Das, a resident of Borjan village.

He said they had informed the forest department about the elephant depredation.

The elephant herds are spotted in the area every day.

Harinaryan Changing, a farmer of Balijan village in Tinsukia district, said, "Every night the herd comes out from Upper Dehing reserve forest and destroys our paddy fields. We cultivate rice once a year and the harvest is our only sustenance but it seems that this year we cannot save our paddy fields."

Though man-elephant conflict in these areas is nothing new, the frequency of incidents has increased manifold in recent years, mainly because of the loss of elephant habitat because of clearing of forests.

Digboi forest ranger Parineeta Singh told The Telegraph on Sunday, "We have less manpower but are still doing our best to save wildlife. We have provided kerosene, crackers and torches to the villagers to drive the elephants away. This year there is a big herd comprising 70 to 80 elephants and we are having a tough time driving them away. We are keeping a watch on the Bogipani and Golai elephant corridors," Singh added.

She added that this year the elephants had destroyed many paddy fields in Digboi.

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Real animals claimed as CGI puts welfare board on alert

HYDERABAD: The familiar prescreening note that assures us that no animal was harmed during the shooting of the film and the advancement in computer graphics technology would have us believe that filmmakers are no longer running afoul of the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI). But it seems that many directors are using real animals in the guise of computer generated imagery (CGI).
Following a recent revelation that a filmmaker used a real elephant while shooting despite claiming that it was just graphics, the animal welfare board has decided to undertake stringent checks before giving pre-shooting permissions and no objection certificates before certification by CBFC for Hindi and south Indian language films. If need be, legal action will be taken in instances where an animal was harmed, it said.

The AWBI has also issued notices to a few filmmakers who misguided the board by claiming that the animals depicted in their films were computer graphics. Makers of Malayalam film 'Abhiyude Katha Anuvinteyum' and Tamil film 'Abiyum Anuvum' were asked as to why legal action cannot be initiated against them for showing a real elephant but claiming it as graphics. In the case of Naga Shourya's Telugu film 'Chalo' too, the filmmakers had claimed that a goat was animated when it was real. Following this, the film was not approved.

Apart from withholding approvals, AWBI has also issued orders not to depict cock fight, dogfight, cow slaughter, among others, and put forward several conditions while granting approvals. While giving nod to Chiranjeevi's 'Sye Raa, Narasimha Reddy', the board set a condition that shooting shall take place only in the presence of animal welfare board officers.

Members of the film fraternity, however, say the stringent AWBI is making their job tough. "We have strong objections regarding the whole system of NOCs and permission granted by the Animal Welfare Board of India. We have raised the issue at CBFC, but the entire film industry has to make representations on this. The issue is that the board office is located in Chennai. Film producers have to go all the way there for approvals and commission agents are exploiting this. The AWBI should set up regional offices in all states so that filmmakers can apply locally as well. Also, the board meets twice or thrice a month. It should meet more frequently to clear pre-shoot permission and issue NOCs," national-level member of Central Board of Film Certification and actress, Jeevita Rajasekhar, told TOI .

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Two killed in elephant attack

Two persons were killed in elephant attack at Terlo forest under Narla forest range in Kalahandi district on Monday night.

They were identified as Bihari Majhi and Taka Majhi.

In a separate incident, a jumbo herd entered the human settlements in Silapuria village under Betanati forest range of Mayurbhanj district and destroyed four houses.

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Tuesday, December 05, 2017

Paintings by Indian elephant auctioned off in Hungary

Paintings created by an Indian elephant who enjoys wielding a brush were auctioned off by a Hungarian traveling circus on Saturday.

Three of 42-year-old elephant Sandra’s abstract canvasses, with colored lines flowing across them resembling rivers, fetched about 40,000 forints ($150) each.

A painting depicting Sandra herself, done by a Hungarian painter, sold for 260,000 forints. The money will be offered to an elephant sanctuary in Malaysia.

Sandra paints with her trunk purely for pleasure, according to her owner and trainer Florian Richter, a horse acrobat and circus director.

Sandra, who was already well practised in a circus trick involving a shaving brush, was given a paintbrush and she quickly adapted her skills to the canvas.

Richter said that unlike many elephants in Thailand that are thought to be forced to paint, Sandra does it by herself when she is in the mood.

“I only help her with changing the brushes and putting them into paints but she does the rest by herself more or less. I praise her by saying ‘oh this is really good, or not so good’,” Richter said. “We have been together for 40 years so this is a family connection.”

Sandra arrived as a baby elephant at the circus where Richter grew up, as a seventh generation member of an acrobat family.

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Wild elephants help Swachh Bharat cause in Bengal, force villagers to build toilets...

Summary: The department wants to complete the project in three years, which, it hopes will help elephants remain confined to forest areas. People scampering indoors have, in turn, helped reduce the number of casualties in elephant attacks in south Bengal. The number of people killed in elephant attacks in south Bengal have come down from 32 in 2016 to a mere six this year so far. The frequent deaths prompted many to build toilets in their homes,” said Rabindranath Saha, district forest officer of Midnapore division. The forest department has also installed solar lights in vulnerable areas so that people can spot the elephants from a distance and save themselves.

Elephants have achieved what the combined might of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and chief minister Mamata Banerjee could not. Frequent advertisements and intensive campaigns on Swachh Bharat and its Bengal equivalent, Nirmal Bangla, could not convince many to relieve themselves behind closed doors but fear of elephant attacks has driven them away from the fields and open, especially in the districts of West Midnapore, Bankura and Jhargram, forest officers told HT. People scampering indoors have, in turn, helped reduce the number of casualties in elephant attacks in south Bengal. The number of people killed in elephant attacks in south Bengal have come down from 32 in 2016 to a mere six this year so far. Read: Tackling man-animal conflict: Bengal govt plans elephant museum “Many people died in elephant attacks when they went to forests early in the morning or after sunset to respond to the call of nature. The frequent deaths prompted many to build toilets in their homes,” said Rabindranath Saha, district forest officer of Midnapore division. The forest department, too, built a few community toilets , As Reported By Hindustan Times.

According to the Newspaper,“In our area, we constructed more than 10 community toilets at strategic points. We are also building toilets in some houses. We have a number of such proposals at hand,” Saha added. Every year, herds of elephants from Dolma range of hills in Jharkhand come to Bengal and roam around in these districts destroying life, crop and property. Bengal has not implemented Swachh Bharat and has its own Nirmal Bangla (clean Brngal) equivalent.

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Saturday, December 02, 2017

State Forest dept takes steps to curb jumbo menace

Kolkata: The state Forest department is leaving no stone unturned to check the entry of elephants into human locality. Chief minister Mamata Banerjee in her recent administrative review meetings has instructed the Forest department to take measures to stop elephants from sneaking into human corridor and keep a leash on the incidents of man animal conflict.

 "We are procuring as many as 15 specially trained elephants from Karnataka and half a dozen elephants from Andaman & Nicobar Islands who will be deployed to prevent the jumbos from straying into human territory," Forest minister Binay Krishna Burman, told Millennium Post.

A senior official of the department said that they are creating arrangements for water and food at one or two places in the patch forest areas of South Bengal to keep the pachyderms within the confines of the forest. In North Bengal, elephants enter into the locality from the bordering states of Assam and countries like Nepal and Bhutan as they are often subjected to torture.

"In Nepal, the Army often shoots elephants that are violent in nature and they sneak into our territory with bullet wounds. There have been a number of such cases in the last few years when we had treated such injured jumbos. We have held several meetings with our counterparts in the Centre and have urged them to initiate talks in the national level to address this problem," an official said.

Forest officials had observed a pattern among elephants entering into areas of South Bengal from Jharkhand and then travelling to Odisha. However, Odisha has created a canal in the escape route of the jumbos thereby preventing their entry. So once elephants enter our state from Jharkhand, they stay back. "We have been holding talks both in the state level and the national level on this issue," the official added.

To read the full article, click on the story title


Thursday, November 30, 2017

Villagers knit jumpers for Indian elephants to protect the large mammals from near-freezing temperatures

Villagers knit jumpers for Indian elephants to guard the large mammals from near-freezing temperatures
Regional women create colourful jumpers for formerly abused animals after team at conservation center warn of temperatures dipping near to freezing point

Elephants, lots of whom have experienced serious punishment before, photographed carrying the knitted multi-coloured, pyjama-like garments knitted by local villagers Roger Allen
Dinosaurs in India are sporting colourful woollen jumpers after villagers knitted the super-size garments to guard the creatures from near-freezing temperatures.

Ladies in a village near the Wildlife SOS Elephant Conservation and Care Centre in the northern city of Mathura apparently started producing the vivid, pyjama-like clothes after staff at the middle warned conditions were approaching sub-zero at night.

The conservation centre takes in rescued elephants who’ve previously suffered chronic neglect and beatings from terrible handlers.

Kartick Satyanarayan, president of the heart, said it was important to protect the previously abused elephants from the cold.

“It is vital to keep our elephants protected from the bitter cold in this severe winter, since they are weak and susceptible having suffered so much abuse making them prone to conditions such as pneumonia,” she told the Changing Times of India.

“The cold also aggravates their arthritis which is a popular problem which our rescued elephants need to deal with.”

The middle currently houses 20 dinosaurs that have been saved from illegal captivity, trafficking mafia, used for road begging and circuses where these were abused and subjected to extreme cruelty.

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Success in jumbo tracking

The state forest department's decision to introduce global positioning systems (GPS) to track elephants and curb the jumbo menace near human habitations in the forest division has started to yield dividends.

"The GPS trackers introduced in the division's seven elephant-interference-prone forest ranges have achieved a certain degree of success in tackling man-elephant conflict," said Keonjhar's divisional forest officer Santosh Joshi.

"Villages under the forested areas of Keonjhar, Bhuyan-Juanga-Pidha, Telkio, Ghatgaon, Patna, Champua and Barbil have borne the brunt of elephant depredation over the past few months. Locating the animals was important to drive then away from the forest-side villages. After deliberations with elephant experts, we resorted to the GPS tracking, and it is paying dividends," he said.

Nearly 230 contractual employees, with the assistance of forest officials, are keeping 24x7 watch in batches on the movement of the elephants armed with GPS. Once the elephants are tracked, their location is transmitted to the district control room, which then alerts the patrolling team nearby to drive them away from human habitations, Joshi said.

Technology has made tracking movements of wild elephants and their corridors easier, he said.

Five people have died, while 30 others suffered injuries in elephant attacks since January. Over 100 houses have been damaged by herds, while the extent of damage caused to farmland is yet be assessed, said a forest official.

The GPS-tracking teams spotted 85 elephants on Thursday night. The Champua forest range, which is the worst-hit, recorded 28 jumbos.

Of the 85 elephants tracked, around 20 came from forested areas in Jharkhand and Bengal. Patrolling squads have stepped up watch in those areas to curb possible outbreaks of man-elephant conflict. An official said there have been no reports of elephants causing damage to life and property in the past week.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Human-Elephant Conflict Renders 21 Families Homeless

In another instance of Human-Elephant Conflict, a herd of elephants has entered and damaged parts of the village of Raitrai, Dharamjaigarh, over the past 14 days. The herd destroyed 17 homes in its wake rendering 21 families homeless.

The tiny hamlet has temporarily relocated itself to the neighbouring village of Poriya Panchayat Bhavan. Every day the villagers traverse a kilometre and a half, back and forth from their their temporary settlement to their village, in order to repair their homes. While some brave the flooded Samarsuta river during the course of their journey, others, on days of severe flooding remain stranded, choosing to spend the night in their broken homes.

Sajal Madhu, Sanctuary’s Mud On Boots Project Leader was at the scene to understand the issue and assist the locals of Raitrai. The DFO Pranay Mishra was informed of the incident. Upon reaching the location, he spoke to the villagers and assured them compensation for their losses. Rice was distributed to the villagers as a form of immediate relief.

In light of the rising Human-Elephant Conflict, the villagers were briefed on handling situation arising with elephants in the future. They were given guidance on affectively minimising damage and staying safe. They were also cautioned of elephant behaviour — why elephants get agitated and the importance of never instigating an elephant or a herd.

Human-Elephant Conflict has steadily been on the rise in the state of Chhattisgarh, as human settlements increase, mining intensifies and forests are razed, changing the migratory and feeding patterns of elephants. Habitat destruction and fragmentation has forced huge herds of these otherwise gentle giants into human settlements. While corporate conglomerates plough the land, man and animal alike struggle to consolidate their space.

As of the present-day scenario, awareness campaigns have become imperative in order to apprise people of the situation and help create a deeper understanding of these majestic creatures and mitigate conflict.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/conservation/news/10730-human-elephant-conflict-renders-21-families-homeless

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Baby elephants mum stuck watering hole

Three baby elephants and their mother who jumped into a watering hole for a drink had to be rescued after they got stuck in the muddy bath in northern India.

Nearby villagers woke to the sound of 'trumpeting' and rushed to the pond to find the four trapped elephants in Dhelsara village, Chhattisgarh state yesterday.

Locals threw branches and tree trunks into the mud to keep the panting, exhausted elephants afloat while they helped the mother escape.

Meanwhile, diggers created a slope to allow her three babies to follow her out.

One onlooker said: 'As the villagers waited for the rescue team to arrive, they helped them keep afloat by hurling dry branches of trees and also offered them food.

'The rescue team, armed with cranes and excavators arrived at the scene in an hour and started the operation.

'They broadened the mouth of the water tank and made a slope for the elephants to climb out of the slushy tank.

'The idea worked, the elephants managed to come out of the tank on their own and ran towards the jungle.'

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Elephant kills man in Rudrapur area

Man elephant conflict continues to rage in Uttarakhand. In two separate incidents, one person was killed while a few others were injured when attacked by elephants.

In a bizarre incident in Udham Singh Nagar district, a man was trampled to death by an elephant in the Rudrapur area. Victim Ashok was returning to his house after work when he was chased by an elephant, who subsequently trampled him to death.

In another incident in Haridwar district, a forest guard, a police jawan and a home guard jawan were injured by an elephant. The incident happened when an elephant strayed into the BHEL area. On getting know of the elephant’s entry into the habitation, forest guards rushed to the site of the incident and tried to shoo away the animal towards the forest area. A forest guard, Pratap Singh, was also injured by the agitated elephant. Another police jawan, Bhola Ram, who tried to intervene, was also injured by the animal.

After shots were fired into the air, the elephant rushed towards the Vishnulok Colony in Haridwar where it attacked a home guard Jawan, Uday. To make matters worse, some elephants strayed into the Roshanabad area o. Forest guards had to make efforts to force the animals back into the forest.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.theindiapost.com/latest-news/elephant-kills-man-in-rudrapur-area/

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Migration of elephants to lower ranges keep Uttarakhand forest officers at toes

Migration of pachyderms from high altitude to lower ranges have become a menace for the Uttarakhand forest department as it continuously battles for the conservation of elephants as well as securing human habitation.

A 25-year-old tusker near Roorkee on Sunday got trapped in high tension wires and died on the spot. About a fortnight ago, elephants blocked movement of traffic on the main Rishikesh-Dehradun road.

The settlements of Balawala, Raiwala and others in the belt are in the constant attack of elephants.

“It’s time when elephants after travelling several miles reach to lower ranges. In search of food, they end up posing threat to people,” Digvijay Singh Khati, chief wildlife warden, told HT.

In Uttarakhand, 1,346 elephants have reported in 2007 following which the state reported 1839 individuals in 2017 national census-an increase of 493 elephants. The hill state was second after Arunachal Pradesh in recording increase in the number of pachyderms.

A whopping increase of elephants may leave conservationists with a big smile, but at the same time, it also draws attention towards growing conflict.

Some key areas in Lansdowne, Haridwar, Terai and Dehradun are fast becoming hotspots for elephant conflict.

“Encroachment in wildlife areas is a common problem. But a key point behind this conflict is blockage of elephant corridors. The long-ranging animal is not able to reach to water bodies due to which it enters human habitation,” said Rajeev Mehta, former honorary wildlife warden of Rajaji Tiger Reserve.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.hindustantimes.com/dehradun/migration-of-elephants-to-lower-ranges-keep-uttarakhand-forest-officers-at-toes/story-rTSIfXxtIGsgGTfuLHBQAJ.html

When elephants and humans cross paths

Elephants enjoy a special place in India. They play a significant role not only in the Indian ecological system but also in its cultural and religious landscape.

Man and elephants have peacefully coexisted for centuries. With rapid urbanisation, however, things are changing. Recent times have seen growing conflicts between elephants and man, both jostling for space, often leading to unfortunate results. Parts of Kodagu and Bannerghatta National Park in Karnataka have traditionally been home to the majestic Asiatic elephants. The Bannerghatta National Park, that stretches across 261 sq km, is among the last remaining tropical dry thorn forests of peninsular India. Since the late 1990s, human-elephant conflicts have escalated in the area.

An increase in human population and agriculture around these areas have reduced the size of the space that these elephants require resulting in elephants raiding agricultural fields for food. This raiding and destroying of property by large mammals have led to several conflicts with the local human population. These recurrent conflicts often result in the loss of both lives and revenue.

In a bid to mitigate these losses, new solutions have been adopted in the affected regions. Physical barriers separating the forested and the non-forested areas in conflict-prone zones have been created to keep the elephants away. Since 2004, in Kodagu alone, 260-km-long trenches have been dug in addition to 322 km of solar-powered fences at a total cost of Rs 94.3 million. While these costs may appear to be high, a cost-benefit analysis shows otherwise. In both Bannerghatta National Park as well as Kodagu, the benefit-cost ratios are high, indicating that the present barriers are useful mitigation measures. By building the fences, both, human as well as animal lives have known to be secured, the farm crops stay protected and with the reduced threat to life and property, the residents would not need to relocate—an activity that demands an additional cost of roughly Rs 72.3 million (US$ 1.2m).

As one can imagine, nobody would be pleased with the prospect of moving out of their homes and their communities and rebuild their lives elsewhere. This is probably the reason why it was found that the locals are willing to contribute a fair amount per household to keep elephants away from their lands. This willingness to help on the part of locals, supplemented by the state government’s plans to barricade one from the other could prove helpful to limit the interaction between the large mammals and affected humans.

Mitigation of conflicts can lead to improved revenue for the Bannerghatta National Park area by improving tourism. There is a need to explore more ways for humans and elephants to share land in perfect harmony. Let us all make some room for these gentle giants!

‘Let's Invest in Nature’ (#LetsInvestInNature) is a special series of video stories designed by the Indo-German Biodiversity Programme. It is dedicated to estimating and mainstreaming the true economic value of biodiversity in business-related decisions and policy making. Watch this short video for more information.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.indiawaterportal.org/articles/when-elephants-and-humans-cross-paths

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Wildlife adventures are putting animal welfare at stake

Millions of tourists criss-cross the planet each day in search of new adventures, excitement and unique experiences. Tour operators are forever coming out with new and innovative ways to lure thrill-seekers. Among them, the most popular is wildlife tourism. Besides elephants, tigers, whales, mountain gorillas, camels, water buffaloes and yaks, the latest tourism attraction includes diving with killer whales, swimming with whale sharks and walking with wolves and wild bears. In the wake of ecotourism, animal exploitation and abuse have become rampant. Though there are strict rules to protect animals in most countries, they are often poorly enforced.

In Thailand, elephants, world’s largest land mammals, are a huge tourist draw. Its multi-million dollar tourism industry uses nearly 2,500 jumbos for treks and excursions. Unfortunately, the ordinary tourist remains oblivious to the exploitation and abuse this animal is subjected to when kept in captivity for training.

Elephant calves usually remain attached to their mothers for up to 16 years. Calves as young as six-month-old are taken away from their mothers and thrown in stockades, and prodded with spikes and electric prods till they obey the trainers’ command. Some activists recently released video clips showing young jumbos being chained and shocked with electric cattle prods and hit with bull hooks to get  trained for back safari. Following this, while many tour operators in the country declared that they will no longer offer elephant rides, others continue to do so. In this regard, the Thai Elephant Conservation Centre has set an example for many of us to follow.

In India, too, elephants are subjected to similar abuse. Around 600 elephants are involved in tourism-related activities as well as entertainment shows and fort tours. An archaic wooden howdah, weighing upto 60 kg, is strapped onto the jumbo’s back and it is forced to carry the weight of four tourists besides the mahout, totalling to almost 400 kg. Imagine the pressure on spine the poor animal takes! They suffer from chafe, swollen legs, maggot infestations, wounds etc.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Monday, November 06, 2017

Jumbo carcass riddle

The carcass of an adult male wild elephant, with its tusks, trunk and tail chopped off and chunks of meat hacked off from the body, was found at Dolopa village, 37km from Assam's Sivasagar town, on Saturday.

Residents who found the carcass in the wee hours said the elephant could have been poisoned as it appeared to be healthy. They said the tusks, trunk and tail were missing and chunks of meat had been carved out of the body with a sharp weapon.

They, however, refused to speculate whether the animal was killed for alleged meat consumption though they admitted that some locals do consume elephant meat.

They said the elephant had strayed from its herd and was seen wandering in the area on Friday.

Forest officials rushed to the spot and collected samples from the carcass for investigation. They later buried the carcass in the adjoining field.

Divisional forest officer of Sivasagar forest division Bidya Bordoloi said they conducted post-mortem at the site but did not find any trace of poison. They have sent samples to the forensic lab and are expecting the report next week.

Bordoloi said the death was "mysterious", ruling out electrocution as well. Asked the reason for the animal's death, he said nothing could be said till they receive the forensic report.

Residents said elephants, revered as a religious and cultural icon in India, are regarded as enemies in the area as they regularly stomp into the villages, damage paddy fields and demolish houses. "Several incidents of attack on villagers have been reported too," a villager said. Because of the man-elephant conflict, locals at times take extreme measures such as poisoning jumbos, he added.

The area is frequented by wild elephants and several incidents of man-elephant conflict have been reported from there in the recent past. Several elephant carcasses have been recovered without the trunk or tail.

Though, elephants are hounded and killed when they wander into human settlements, damage crops and houses, they are also killed for ivory.

India has nearly 30,000 elephants in its forests and reserves and the animal enjoys the highest Schedule 1 species status under the Wildlife Protection Act 1972. It is also declared endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Elephant meat is considered a delicacy in some Southeast Asian countries like Thailand and Vietnam and in African nations like Cameroon and Congo.

The Indian elephant is native to India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Laos, China, Cambodia and Vietnam.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/north-east/jumbo-carcass-riddle-180089

Sunday, November 05, 2017

Success in jumbo tracking - Tech support to curb man-elephant conflicts

The state forest department's decision to introduce global positioning systems (GPS) to track elephants and curb the jumbo menace near human habitations in the forest division has started to yield dividends.

"The GPS trackers introduced in the division's seven elephant-interference-prone forest ranges have achieved a certain degree of success in tackling man-elephant conflict," said Keonjhar's divisional forest officer Santosh Joshi.

"Villages under the forested areas of Keonjhar, Bhuyan-Juanga-Pidha, Telkio, Ghatgaon, Patna, Champua and Barbil have borne the brunt of elephant depredation over the past few months. Locating the animals was important to drive then away from the forest-side villages. After deliberations with elephant experts, we resorted to the GPS tracking, and it is paying dividends," he said.

Nearly 230 contractual employees, with the assistance of forest officials, are keeping 24x7 watch in batches on the movement of the elephants armed with GPS. Once the elephants are tracked, their location is transmitted to the district control room, which then alerts the patrolling team nearby to drive them away from human habitations, Joshi said.

Technology has made tracking movements of wild elephants and their corridors easier, he said.

Five people have died, while 30 others suffered injuries in elephant attacks since January. Over 100 houses have been damaged by herds, while the extent of damage caused to farmland is yet be assessed, said a forest official.

The GPS-tracking teams spotted 85 elephants on Thursday night. The Champua forest range, which is the worst-hit, recorded 28 jumbos.

Of the 85 elephants tracked, around 20 came from forested areas in Jharkhand and Bengal. Patrolling squads have stepped up watch in those areas to curb possible outbreaks of man-elephant conflict. An official said there have been no reports of elephants causing damage to life and property in the past week.

A herd of 32 elephants from the Jayanta reserve forest in Jharkhand had recently intruded into the forest-side villages in Champua, wreaking havoc in over a dozen human settlements.

The herd had damaged several houses at the villages and ravaged crop fields. However, they were tracked by the GPS and were successfully chased back.

Deforestation has caused the elephant habitat to shrink in Jharkhand. As a result, they migrate to Champua in search of food and water, paving the way for frequent man-elephant conflicts in Keonjhar, said a forest official.

Unlike tigers, elephants are not territorial and migrate over long distances.

Their movement out of their original habitats to enter human habitations triggers conflicts.

The outbreak of man-elephant conflicts has become a recurring phenomenon in 44 forest divisions in the state.

Encroachments from village residents, who live and forage or graze cattle in the protected parks and wildlife sanctuaries, conferred the status of habitation corridors for elephants, has given rise to frequent confrontations between humans and elephants, said a wildlife activist.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/success-in-jumbo-tracking-181456

Human-Elephant Conflict Renders 21 Families Homeless

In another instance of Human-Elephant Conflict, a herd of elephants has entered and damaged parts of the village of Raitrai, Dharamjaigarh, over the past 14 days. The herd destroyed 17 homes in its wake rendering 21 families homeless.

The tiny hamlet has temporarily relocated itself to the neighbouring village of Poriya Panchayat Bhavan. Every day the villagers traverse a kilometre and a half, back and forth from their their temporary settlement to their village, in order to repair their homes. While some brave the flooded Samarsuta river during the course of their journey, others, on days of severe flooding remain stranded, choosing to spend the night in their broken homes.

Sajal Madhu, Sanctuary’s Mud On Boots Project Leader was at the scene to understand the issue and assist the locals of Raitrai. The DFO Pranay Mishra was informed of the incident. Upon reaching the location, he spoke to the villagers and assured them compensation for their losses. Rice was distributed to the villagers as a form of immediate relief.

In light of the rising Human-Elephant Conflict, the villagers were briefed on handling situation arising with elephants in the future. They were given guidance on affectively minimising damage and staying safe. They were also cautioned of elephant behaviour — why elephants get agitated and the importance of never instigating an elephant or a herd.

Human-Elephant Conflict has steadily been on the rise in the state of Chhattisgarh, as human settlements increase, mining intensifies and forests are razed, changing the migratory and feeding patterns of elephants. Habitat destruction and fragmentation has forced huge herds of these otherwise gentle giants into human settlements. While corporate conglomerates plough the land, man and animal alike struggle to consolidate their space.

As of the present-day scenario, awareness campaigns have become imperative in order to apprise people of the situation and help create a deeper understanding of these majestic creatures and mitigate conflict.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/conservation/news/10730-human-elephant-conflict-renders-21-families-homeless

Elephant kills man in Rudrapur area

In a bizarre incident in Udham Singh Nagar district, a man was trampled to death by an elephant in the Rudrapur area. Victim Ashok was returning to his house after work when he was chased by an elephant, who subsequently trampled him to death.

In another incident in Haridwar district, a forest guard, a police jawan and a home guard jawan were injured by an elephant. The incident happened when an elephant strayed into the BHEL area. On getting know of the elephant’s entry into the habitation, forest guards rushed to the site of the incident and tried to shoo away the animal towards the forest area. A forest guard, Pratap Singh, was also injured by the agitated elephant. Another police jawan, Bhola Ram, who tried to intervene, was also injured by the animal.

After shots were fired into the air, the elephant rushed towards the Vishnulok Colony in Haridwar where it attacked a home guard Jawan, Uday. To make matters worse, some elephants strayed into the Roshanabad area o. Forest guards had to make efforts to force the animals back into the forest.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.theindiapost.com/latest-%20news/elephant-kills-man-in-rudrapur-area/

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Success in jumbo tracking - Tech support to curb man-elephant conflicts

Keonjhar: The state forest department's decision to introduce global positioning systems (GPS) to track elephants and curb the jumbo menace near human habitations in the forest division has started to yield dividends.

"The GPS trackers introduced in the division's seven elephant-interference-prone forest ranges have achieved a certain degree of success in tackling man-elephant conflict," said Keonjhar's divisional forest officer Santosh Joshi.

"Villages under the forested areas of Keonjhar, Bhuyan-Juanga-Pidha, Telkio, Ghatgaon, Patna, Champua and Barbil have borne the brunt of elephant depredation over the past few months. Locating the animals was important to drive then away from the forest-side villages. After deliberations with elephant experts, we resorted to the GPS tracking, and it is paying dividends," he said.

Nearly 230 contractual employees, with the assistance of forest officials, are keeping 24x7 watch in batches on the movement of the elephants armed with GPS. Once the elephants are tracked, their location is transmitted to the district control room, which then alerts the patrolling team nearby to drive them away from human habitations, Joshi said.

Technology has made tracking movements of wild elephants and their corridors easier, he said.

Five people have died, while 30 others suffered injuries in elephant attacks since January. Over 100 houses have been damaged by herds, while the extent of damage caused to farmland is yet be assessed, said a forest official.

The GPS-tracking teams spotted 85 elephants on Thursday night. The Champua forest range, which is the worst-hit, recorded 28 jumbos.

Of the 85 elephants tracked, around 20 came from forested areas in Jharkhand and Bengal. Patrolling squads have stepped up watch in those areas to curb possible outbreaks of man-elephant conflict. An official said there have been no reports of elephants causing damage to life and property in the past week.

A herd of 32 elephants from the Jayanta reserve forest in Jharkhand had recently intruded into the forest-side villages in Champua, wreaking havoc in over a dozen human settlements.

The herd had damaged several houses at the villages and ravaged crop fields. However, they were tracked by the GPS and were successfully chased back.

Deforestation has caused the elephant habitat to shrink in Jharkhand. As a result, they migrate to Champua in search of food and water, paving the way for frequent man-elephant conflicts in Keonjhar, said a forest official.

Unlike tigers, elephants are not territorial and migrate over long distances.

Their movement out of their original habitats to enter human habitations triggers conflicts.

The outbreak of man-elephant conflicts has become a recurring phenomenon in 44 forest divisions in the state.

Encroachments from village residents, who live and forage or graze cattle in the protected parks and wildlife sanctuaries, conferred the status of habitation corridors for elephants, has given rise to frequent confrontations between humans and elephants, said a wildlife activist.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/success-in-jumbo-tracking-181456

Friday, October 27, 2017

Villagers claim elephants from Nepal damaged crops, officials say no

Pilibhit: A herd of 30 to 35 elephants of Nepal’s Royal Shukla Phanta Wildlife Reserve strayed into Tatarganj village in Pilibhit district on Sunday afternoon and damaged standing paddy and sugarcane crops. Tatarganj, a remote village in trans-Sharda region, is located on the Indo-Nepal border.

However, both sub divisional magistrate, Puranpur circle, JB Singh, and the commandant of 49the battalion of SSB, Dilbag Singh, denied that the herd had caused extensive damage.

According to villagers — Kulwant Singh, Gurdeep Singh, Karnail Singh, Hardutt Singh and Santokh Singh — a herd of 30 to 35 elephants entered the Indian territory from Nepal and wreaked havoc on their standing cane and paddy crops across 25 acres. The herd also destroyed a thatched-roof house near the affected fields.

One of the residents, Kulwant Singh, alleged that forest staff of Sampurna Nagar forest range of district Kheri were informed about the marauding wild elephants but they extended no help to the villagers.

On being asked about this, commandant of SSB Dilbag Singh quoted the report sent to him by SSB border post personnel who said the herd of elephants had intruded into Tatarganj from near border pillar number 30 and damaged around 100 quintals of sugarcane. The herd retuned to Nepal after sometime, he said.

Sub divisional magistrate of Puranpur JB Singh also denied any damage to crops by elephants. He said, “I am returning from Tatrganj after inspecting the reported area. The villagers have fabricated a false story about massive damage to standing crops by the elephants with an intention of filing claims for compensation.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bareilly/villagers-claim-elephants-from-nepal-damaged-crops-officials-say-no/articleshow/61094114.cms

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

This fund-raising rally is making efforts to save endangered Asian elephants

Waris Ahluwalia

Global warming and other hazardous environmental changes (mainly massive loss of habitats) has caused elephant numbers to plummet by 90 per cent in the last few years.

In the wake to safeguard the endangered species, the Elephant Family is investing all their efforts into protecting Asian elephants and their habitats. The non-profit organisation that has the royal patronage of The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall as royal presidents, has supported over 160 field projects in six elephant range states: India, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and Cambodia.

One such project is a series titled ‘Travels to my Elephant’, a rally the Elephant Family started back in 2015, where racers traveled across India to spotlight the plight of Asian elephants while raising funds for Indian elephant corridors.

The Elephant Family is back with a second rally this year, where 85 adventurers will embark on a 500km journey across Rajasthan in aid of the endangered Asian elephant.

To celebrate the second edition of the rally, Ruth Ganesh (Elephant Family), Ben Elliot (Quintessentially Foundation) and actor Waris Ahluwalia (Global Explorer for The Luxury Collection) hosted the send-off party in partnership with The Luxury Collection Hotels and Resorts for the racers and VIP supporters at One Horse Guards in London last night. During the evening, guests sampled limited-edition cocktails designed by The Luxury Collection London properties, using House of Waris teas.

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Farmer trampled by elephants

Fear gripped the hamlets abutting the Koundinya elephant sanctuary in Palamaner and Baireddipalle mandals on Thursday, when the body of a farmer who went missing a few days ago was found in the forests in a highly decomposed state, after he was reportedly trampled by elephants.

Palamaner Circle Inspector A. Surendra Reddy said Muneendra, 32, of Chettapenta village of Palamaner mandal, went inside the sanctuary along with cows four days ago. As he didn't return home, his family members and neighbours searched for him but in vain. Some cattlemen noticed the body on Thursday and informed Palamaner police after identifying him.

The officials suspect that as the badly mauled body was found in the forests of adjoining Baireddipalle mandal, the deceased might have run for life from the a wild herd.

Marks of trampling and the footprints and dung of elephants were noticed in the vicinity.

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Friday, October 06, 2017

Injured elephant calf at ICU of CWRC

An elephant calf, which suddenly fell down into a narrow drain at Mikirjan in a tea garden at Behora near Kaziranga National Park and rescued by its own mother, is now under the treatment of Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) under Wildlife Trust of India at Borjuri here. According to Dr Samsul Haque, attending veterinarian, even though the elephant calf was initially rescued by the mother elephant, but later in the evening it again fell down, only to be rescued by local people.

By that time, the calf visibly became very weak and the CWRC was accordingly informed about it.

The calf was then immediately brought to the CWRC and put under ICU treatment, said Dr Haque. But now the calf is showing a sign of slight improvement although it is not out of danger.

While talking about the problems being faced by elephant calves in tea gardens because of the existence of drainage system at the very corridors of wild animals, Dr Navin Pandey from Corbett Foundation felt that there is a need for meaningful talks between the officials of tea gardens and Forest Department to find out a solution to minimise the tragedy. Dr Pandey added that often the calves suffered more in many of the cases and, in some cases, the nature of the injuries remained fatal. He said that already the elephant corridors in the nation remained very fragmented, therefore the Government must initiate steps to keep the existing elephant corridors intact even if these corridors were inside the tea estates.

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Herd of elephants stray into Doon residential area

A family of three elephants strayed into the Ladpur residential area of the city early today, triggering fear among locals, officials and residents said. The elephants, however, did not hurt any passersby and fled into the surrounding forests after forest department officials fired in the air and set off firecrackers to scare them away, Dehradun District Forest Officer Prasanna Kumar Patro said.

"The elephants are still in the forests near the city and we are trying to chase them away to Rajaji National Park", he said.

The herd comprised a family of three elephants including a male, a female elephant and their calf, Patro said, adding the family was recently spotted roaming around in the Nakraunda area.

With construction work on the Dehradun-Haridwar National Highway picking up momentum, the elephants seem to have lost their way to Rajaji National Park and strayed into residential areas, Patro said.

Witnesses said the elephants had initially strayed into the Badrish colony adjacent to Dalanwala.

"We woke up to the sounds of firecrackers and gunshots this morning. As we looked out we saw three elephants running into the forests," Badrish colony resident Rajesh Painuli said.

It is the first time that elephants entered so deep into the city.

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Thursday, October 05, 2017

Elephant herd strays into Dehradun, triggers panic

A family of three elephants strayed into the Ladpur residential area of the city early today, triggering fear among locals, officials and residents said.

The elephants, however, did not hurt any passersby and fled into the surrounding forests after forest department officials fired in the air and set off firecrackers to scare them away, Dehradun District Forest Officer Prasanna Kumar Patro said.

"The elephants are still in the forests near the city and we are trying to chase them away to Rajaji National Park", he said.

The herd comprised a family of three elephants including a male, a female elephant and their calf, Patro said, adding the family was recently spotted roaming around in the Nakraunda area.

With construction work on the Dehradun-Haridwar National Highway picking up momentum,
the elephants seem to have lost their way to Rajaji National Park and strayed into residential areas, Patro said. Witnesses said the elephants had initially strayed into the Badrish colony adjacent to Dalanwala.

"We woke up to the sounds of firecrackers and gunshots this morning. As we looked out we saw three elephants running into the forests," Badrish colony resident Rajesh Painuli said. It is the first time that elephants entered so deep into the city.

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4 injured, one critical, after elephant attack

Four people have been injured in elephant attacks near BHEL, Ranipur, in Haridwar Forest Division (HFD) in just two days.

Ashvini Kumar and Hari Singh were attacked by the pachyderm when they went to relieve themselves near a dried-up river that passes through the forest division on Monday. While Hari managed to flee, Ashvini sustained serious injuries on his ribs and jaw and was admitted to Himalayan Hospital at Jolly Grant where his condition is said to be critical. Both are residents of Labour Colony near the BHEL township.

On Tuesday, two more residents of the colony had a narrow escape when they were attacked by an elephant. Sunil Kumar and Chhote Lal sustained minor injuries while running from the elephant.
According to range officer, Dinesh Nautiyal, “The doctor’s report will shed light on the nature of the attack. There is a possibility that the elephant injured Ashvini with its trunk.” Nautiyal said that a team of forest guards was patrolling the area.

The officer added that the compensation would be decided based on the doctor’s report. A person injured critically by a wild animal inside the forest receives Rs 50,000 while a victim with light injuries gets Rs 15,000.

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No elephant ride at Amber during Navratri festival

Elephant rides will remain suspended at Amber Fort during the upcoming festival of Navratri.

The rides at the massive courtyard of Jaleb Chowk and the popular Shila Mata Temple have been halted from today till the end of the month.

However, the light and sound show in English at 8.30 pm will go as usual during the auspicious Navratri festival.

Also, on the World Tourism Day (September 27) the entry to Amber Palace will be free for all.

The rides will resume from October 1 and continue till March 2018, a government release said.

Elephant ride at Amber, is one of the highlights of a visit to the stunning Amer Fort. Elephants will be decorated with traditional painted patterns and effortlessly transport visitors up the steep slope to the fort.

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Elephant injured in landmine blast dies

The 20-year-old elephant was injured when a landmine planted under the ground went when the animal's front right leg fell on top of it two days ago near village Latu under Palamau Tiger Reserve buffer area.

The leg was severely damaged in the explosion and the elephant succumbed on Wednesday night, Palamau Tiger Reserve director M P Singh said. The forest department tried its best to provide adequate treatment to the injured pachyderm but in vain, he said.

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Farmer trampled by elephants

Fear gripped the hamlets abutting the Koundinya elephant sanctuary in Palamaner and Baireddipalle mandals on Thursday, when the body of a farmer who went missing a few days ago was found in the forests in a highly decomposed state, after he was reportedly trampled by elephants.

Palamaner Circle Inspector A. Surendra Reddy said Muneendra, 32, of Chettapenta village of Palamaner mandal, went inside the sanctuary along with cows four days ago. As he didn't return home, his family members and neighbours searched for him but in vain. Some cattlemen noticed the body on Thursday and informed Palamaner police after identifying him.

The officials suspect that as the badly mauled body was found in the forests of adjoining Baireddipalle mandal, the deceased might have run for life from the a wild herd.

Marks of trampling and the footprints and dung of elephants were noticed in the vicinity.

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Wednesday, October 04, 2017

Wildlife product seizures go up 90 per cent

The seizures of wildlife products by the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) have gone up by 90 per cent till August in comparison to the seizures in 2014.

The SSB has seized products worth Rs 187.89 crore this year against Rs 2.21 crore three years ago. The SSB is tasked with guarding India’s borders with Nepal and Bhutan.

These products were seized from 93 smugglers against those caught in 2014. A major reason behind the SSB’s success in its drive against wildlife crimes was a constant watch on the smuggling of endangered species like Tokey Gecko Lizards and prohibited items like snake venom, bones and skin of tigers and leopards, elephant tusks/ivory, rhino horn and deer skin and deer meat, etc.

In the recent past, the SSB apprehended snake venom worth Rs 100 crore in West Bengal, which happens to the be the most wildlife-crime prone state with 125 cases followed by UP with 54 cases. Sources said Alipurduar in West Bengal is the main hub of the wildlife smuggling from where 98 cases had been reported followed by Bahraich (15 cases) and Balrampur (15) in UP, Udalguri (14) in Assam, Jailpaiguri (12) and Darjeeling (10) in West Bengal. The illegal trade also includes the body parts of dead animals like rhino horns, leopard skin and paw, deer horn and skull and elephant trunk.

The data assessed by this newspaper suggests that the price of the seized products has shown a massive increase to the tune of Rs 11.16 crore and Rs 46.62 crore with the arrest of 43 and 70 smugglers in 2015 and 2016, respectively. In 2017, the SSB team seized wild life products worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers in 82 cases.

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Sunday, October 01, 2017

Sashastra Seema Bal now a nemesis for wildlife smugglers

The Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) has had a good run in nabbing the smugglers involved in carrying out wildlife crime. This year, SSB has seized things worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers. These smugglers were involved in smuggling endangered species like Tokey Gecko lizards and prohibited items like snake venom, tiger and leopard skins and bones, elephant tusks/ivory, rhino horn, snake sand boa, tortoise, turtle and deer, deer skin and deer meat.

Recently, the SSB apprehended snake venom worth Rs 100 crore in West Bengal, which happens to the be the most wildlife-crime prone state with 125 cases followed by Uttar Pradesh with 54 cases.

Sources said Alipurduar in West Bengal is the main hub of wildlife smuggling from where 98 cases had been reported followed by Bahraich (15 cases) and Balrampur (15cases) in UP, Udalguri (14cases) in Assam, Jailpaiguri (12) and Darjeeling (10) in West Bengal.

Other areas of wildlife smuggling are Lakhimpur Kheri in UP and Kishanganj and West Champaran in Bihar. The illegal trade also includes body parts of dead animals like rhino horns, leopard skin and paw, deer horn and skull, rein deer skin, barking deer skin and elephant trunk.

The data shows that the price of seized products showed a massive increase to Rs11.16 crore and Rs 46.62 crore with the arrest of 43 and 70 smugglers in 2015 and 2016 respectively. In 2017, the SSB team has seized wild life products worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers in 82 cases.

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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Elephants and tigers kill 3 humans every month in Karnataka

As many as 146 people have been killed by wild elephants and tigers in the past four years in Karnataka, which translates into three deaths per month. The figure raises concerns over the increasing incidence of man-animal conflict.

According to data from the Union ministry of environment, forest and climate change, the number is less in comparison to states like West Bengal and Assam — which witnessed 367 and 241 human deaths respectively in the same period — but experts say the fact that deaths are increasing every year in Karnataka is a cause for worry. Karnataka boasts of the highest number of tigers and elephants in the country.

Data accessed by TOI from the Union ministry and the state forest department shows elephants are more in conflict with human than tigers — 135 of the 146 deaths were caused by jumbos and only 11 by tigers.

"Every year, at least 36 people are being killed by elephants and tigers in Karnataka. Though the number marginally dipped in 2015-16, the last financial year saw it go up to 38," said a senior official from the state forest department.

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Man trampled to death by elephant in Coimbatore district

A 25-year-old man was trampled to death by an elephant near Mullangadu check post on the city outskirts, police said today.

The incident occurred last night when the victim Manishkumar, from Rajasthan, was walking along the road, browsing his cell phone and failed to notice the elephant that suddenly appeared before him, they said.

The pachyderm immediately attacked Manish, an engineer, resulting in his death, they added.
On receiving information, police and forest officials rushed to the spot and recovered the body, police said.

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Elephant drowns in Panna tiger reserve

A female elephant has drowned in Ken river in Panna National Park, leaving behind a mammoth puzzle for the park management because elephants are known to be strong, untiring swimmers.

Named Vindhya, the elephant was born in Panna Tiger Reserve in 2002. Its carcass was seen floating in Ken river on Saturday. It was brought to the shore, and foresters began one of their most interesting investigations ever.

"Prima facie, the cause of death appears to be drowning. After the carcass was fished out, an autopsy was conducted on the spot. We are awaiting the final report to ascertain exact cause of the death," director of Panna National Park, Vivek Jain, said.

Vindhya was one of three elephants used for patrolling the jungle. All three were kept at Peepertola, a jungle camp inside the park. They were fed and were freed to move around on September 9, Jain said. Around 3pm, two elephants were seen near the river but Vindhya was missing. Later in the evening, its carcass was found in the river.

The drowning is very mysterious because elephants are said to be good in water. Their big body provides flotation while the trunk acts like a snorkel. By moving all four legs like paddles, they swim quite fast. In July this year, an elephant was rescued by Sri Lankan Navy 15km into the deep ocean.

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Monday, September 25, 2017

ROGUE WILD ELEPHANT DISRUPTS FUNERAL, STOMPS MAN TO DEATH

A 65-year-old man was trampled to death by a rogue female elephant while performing the last rites of his cousin at a burial ground located at Karumalai tea estate in Valparai here on Saturday evening.

The deceased was identified as S Velusamy, a retired tea estate employee. His cousin Rajendran, 67, of the same locality, had died of some ailment on Friday evening. Velusamy, along with other kin and neighbours of the deceased, took the body to a burial ground located at Karumalai estate in a tractor on Saturday evening. While they were performing last rites, a wild elephant charged towards them and the people ran for their life, abandoning the body at the burial ground.

Velusamy was, however, not able to run and the elephant trampled him to death. When alerted, forest officials reached the spot but the grieving relatives of Velusamy didn’t allow them to take the body to the Valparai government hospital for postmortem. They also staged a protest, urging the forest department to protect them from wild elephant attacks and also to chase the rogue elephant away into the reserve forest area.

Valparai police also reached the spot and held talks with the kin of the elephant attack victim. The kin finally agreed to take the body to the government hospital and the body was handed over to them on Sunday after the postmortem.

The forest department, meanwhile, brought kumki Kaleem from Topslip elephant camp to Valparai to chase the rogue elephant away into the reserve forest area from the tea estate. “We have deployed additional forest department field staff at the Karumalai tea estate to protect the labourers residing in the quarters. We have already initiated steps to chase away the elephant to the reserve forest and are likely to bring another kumki from Topslip elephant camp to assist us in the mission,” said V Subbaiah, district forest officer, Pollachi forest division.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Woman, her minor son killed in elephant attack

A 35-year-old woman and her minor son were killed and houses were damaged by a herd of wild elephants in a village of Chhattisgarh?s Surguja district, police said today.

The incident took place last night in Pidiya village under Sitapur police station area, Station House Officer (SHO) Sitapur Dinesh Singh Baghel said.

A herd of wild elephants entered the village, which lies in the Mainpat forest range. A woman, Ratni Bai, and her son Sukhsai (5) were trampled to death by the elephants after they came in front of the herd, he said.

The pachyderms also damaged at least 20 houses in the village and killed a livestock before going back inside the forest, the SHO added.

The kin of the deceased have been given an instant relief amount of Rs 50,000, a local forest official said.

The thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, comprising Surguja, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur and Korea districts, are known for human-elephant conflict.

The region has witnessed several killings of tribals and widespread damages to houses and crops by rogue elephant in the past

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Wild elephant collapses, dies

A female elephant, which reportedly went on the rampage at Valparai, today collapsed and died, while being chased away by tamed elephants (Kumki), police said.

The wild elephant's intrusion in the estate area triggered panic over the last few days and a 62-year-old man was found trampled to death on Saturday last.

Following an agitation by the villagers, the forest department deployed two 'kumkis' to either capture or chase the elephant into the jungle.

Amid operations, the wild elephant suddenly collapsed while being chased and died, police said.

The forest officials were contemplating to tranquilise and catch it.

Investigations are on to find the reason for the death, they said.

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Injured elephant given treatment

A 40-year-old female elephant, ailing from injuries to its vulva and face, was treated for its injuries by the forest department staff in the Sigur River in the Singara Range of the Nilgiris North Division on Thursday.

Forest department officials said that the animal was found wandering in the Sigur River since Thursday and that treatment had been given for the last two days. Forest veterinarian E. Vijayaraghavan said that the animal had injuries to its face, eyes and vaginal regions, and maggots had also infested the injured animal.

Acting quickly, the forest department used darts to treat the animal with painkillers and antibiotics. “The animal is standing on its legs, but is refusing to take food. It is also cooperating with our efforts to treat it, so we have also given energy shots,” said Mr. Vijayaraghavan.

Forest department officials in the Nilgiris North Division said that a call would be taken whether to continue treatment to the animal on Friday.

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Wild elephants trample two tribal women to death

Two tribal women were on Thursday trampled to death by wild elephants in Chhattisgarh's Raigarh district, police said. The incident took place at around 1:30 am when a herd of elephants entered in Gerupani village under Kapu forest range, a local police official said.

The victims Budhwaro Bai (50) and Bindi Bai (52) were sleeping in their huts when they were attacked by the pachyderms leaving them dead on the spot, he said, adding other family members managed to escape and saved themselves.

The kin of the deceased have been given an initial relief amount of Rs 25,000 each, the official said adding the remaining compensation will be disbursed soon after completing the necessary process.

The villagers have been advised to take precautions and stay alerted after the movement of pachyderms reported in the area, he added.

The thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, comprising Surguja, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur and Korea districts, are notorious for human elephant conflict incidents.

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Woman Maoist trampled to death by wild elephant in Malappuram

There are reports that a woman Maoist was trampled to death by a wild elephant in Malappuram. A notice brought out by the CPI (Maoist) Western Ghats special regional committee states that a native of Malampuzha, Kattekad of Palakkad Latha was trampled to death by a wild elephant.
Latha, who works for the Bhavani group of Maoist's Western Ghats committee, has been in hiding for the past 15 years.

The incident seems to have took place on August 6, when a wild elephant attacked Latha in the Naadukani jungle of Malappuram. The organisation has expressed their regret at cremating the body without showing it to her relatives or other Maoist activists. The notice also says that the body has been cremated within the jungle.

Meanwhile, the police have started an investigation on the Maoist notice.
Reports say that neither the police nor the forest guards were aware of such an accident and death.

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Two elephants found dead in Kumaon

Two elephants were found dead by patrolling teams in Terai-Central division and Haldwani divisions. The cause of the death of the pachyderms is yet to be determined. While a female elephant was found dead in Terai-Central division, a male pachyderm was found dead in Haldwani forest division. No signs of struggle with another animal were found.

“We are investigating the deaths of the animals. Post-mortem is underway to determine the cause of death,” said Parag Madhukar Dhakate, conservator of forests, Western Circle, Kumaon.

Last month, in the countrywide census of elephants, Uttarakhand ranked sixth with a population of 1,839 elephants. In Uttarakhand, elephants are found in Rajaji Tiger Reserve, Corbett Tiger Reserve, Western Circle and Lansdowne forest division.

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Friday, September 22, 2017

12 jumbos from K’taka to patrol UP’s tiger reserves

Pilibhit: The Uttar Pradesh government is set to procure 12 elephants from Karnataka which will be deployed in Pilibhit Tiger Reserve (PTR), Dudhva Tiger Reserve (DTR) and the Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS) to keep a tight vigil on the movement of poachers.

Confirming the development, SK Upadhyay, UP principal chief conservator of forest (wildlife), said: “The central government has approved the plan and a high-level team of senior forest officials, wildlife experts and veterinarians will now be visiting Karnataka soon to give the final shape to the plan.”

“Of the 12 elephants, four will be given to PTR and the remaining eight will go to DTR. We have made the preliminary identification of elephants matching to our needs. The elephants will now go through a medical test,” said Upadhyay.

“After they are brought from Karnataka, the elephants will be kept separately for at least four-six months to make them adapt local environmental and geographical conditions. The elephants will also be tested for effects of local conditions on them during their period. The quarantine will be developed in surroundings of DTR in Kheri district.”

The prime function of these elephants would be field patrolling; besides, they would also play a crucial role in combing agricultural fields for tigers, he said.

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Centre seeks State plans on jumbo corridors

The Ministry of Environment and Forests has asked the Forest Department to furnish measures being undertaken to secure three elephant corridors in the State as per the direction of the Supreme Court.Earlier this month, hearing on a writ petition by Vidya Athreya, the apex court had asked the Centre to consider measures to make 27 elephant corridors inviolate since these were accorded high priority status in ‘Gajah’ report submitted by the Project Elephant in 2013.

These 27 elephant corridors are located in nine States. The three corridors in Odisha include the Similipal-Satkosia, Baula-Kuldiha and Kotagarh-Chandrapur routes used by the elephants.
Sources in the Wildlife Wing said the MoEF has sought to know if land acquisition would be required to secure the three corridors.In a letter to the State, IG (Forests) and Director, Project Elephant RK Srivastava asked to assess the feasibility of protecting the corridors through land acquisition and stated that MoEF would consider funding assistance for the purpose.

The State Government has been asked to furnish the action taken report within 60 days. Accordingly, the Wildlife Wing has asked the DFOs of Keonjhar, Balasore, Baripada, Rayagada and Baliguda to submit details of the corridors.Sources said, the DFOs would have to indicate the land pattern of the corridors and if there is existence of private land which may necessitate acquisition in various forms to make the corridors secure.

However, of the three corridors, the Similipal-Satkosia and Baula-Kuldiha stretches are part of one composite route used by the elephants as identified by the Wildlife Wing, while the Kotagarh-Chandrapur is a separate one.The State Government has, so far, identified 14 elephant corridors in the State. In 2012-13, it started the Elephant Corridor Management Plan with an annual budget of `5 crore. In 2015, a separate Elephant Management Plan was launched. To converge the initiatives, it clubbed the two schemes under Management of Elephant and Corridors beginning 2016-17.

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