Sunday, August 20, 2017

Dudhwa tusker Mohan kills mahout

Shahjahanpur: In a tragic incident, an elephant trampled his mahout to death in Dudhwa National Park on Thursday night. This is the second person that the 35-year-old elephant, Mohan, has killed in five months. At the time of the incident, no other person was in the vicinity. The body was found on Friday morning. The elephant has now been kept under observation, and forest staff have been advised to keep away from the animal.

Piecing together the evidence, forest officials believe that the incident happened when mahout Ranjeet Kumar (37) went inside the enclosure to apply medicine on another elephant, Sundar, on Thursday night. For some reason, he must have approached Mohan, which was in another part of the enclosure. Another elephant, called Gajraj, was near Mohan. It was raining heavily and Mohan may have become nervous, possibly due to the thunder and lightning, and attacked the mahout.
Dudhwa’s field director Sunil Choudhary is investigating the latest incident and monitoring the elephants. Mohan is being kept under isolation.

In February, Mohan had killed a caretaker who used to feed it. Foresters are not ruling out the possibility of Gajraj attacking the mahout. This elephant is known to be difficult to handle. It was recently sent to Pilibhit for a tiger search operation but was sent back after it attacked an official.
Veterinarian Brijendra Yadav, who works in Lucknow zoo, told TOI, “The elephant may have been in a ‘musth’ state and this could be a reason that it became aggressive and attacked the mahout.” Male elephants turn ‘musth’ from time to time and become highly aggressive. Mostly domestic elephants are kept isolated when they are in a ‘musth’ state because they can attack their keeper at this time. Such a practice is also followed in zoos.”

Choudhary said, “Ranjeet was our best mahout.” He recalled an incident of 2010 in Meerut where an elephant, Shera, created a ruckus during the wedding of then BSP MP Kadir Rana’s son with party’s Rajya Sabha MP Munquad Ali's daughter. Ranjeet had controlled this rogue elephant then. “We have lost a valuable asset and all of us are very upset. We believe that Mohan killed Ranjeet, but there is a probability that Gajraj might have attacked him because both these elephants were in the open enclosure. I am investigating this incident myself.”

According to Dudhwa officials, Ranjeet was deeply attached to all the elephants. He had gone to apply medicine on Sundar and did not return after that. Other staff members went looking for him but returned due to heavy rain. They noticed that Mohan was in an aggressive mood. The search began on Friday morning and Ranjeet’s body was found near the spot where Mohan was.

Choudhary inspected the spot along with deputy director Mahaveer Kaujalgi and a WWF team.
Kaujalgi told TOI, "Ranjeet was taking care of Mohan for the past seven months but he was mainly responsible for Sundar because it was skilled and had a very good bonding with all other elephants.”
Ranjeet’s family was given a compensation of Rs 10,000 by the WWF team. The family has been assured of some compensation by the government as well.

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Wild elephant damages estate shops

Plantation workers block road on Idukki estate seeking protection from elephant raids

A wild elephant damaged a ration shop, a grocery shop, and a few vehicles at Kannamaly estate in Chinnakanal village early on Friday.

The roof of the ration shop and its windowpanes were destroyed. The elephant arrived early in the morning and stayed there for long, posing threat to workers passing by.

The agitated workers later blocked the road and demanded protection from wildlife intrusion.

Reasons for intrusion


Wild elephants have attacked the area on many occasions recently, damaging crops and houses. The destruction of their natural habitat and the disruption of elephant corridor are said to be the reasons for the increased incidents of elephant intrusion into human habitations.

In 2001, the ‘301 colony’ was formed in the Chinnakanal village, by issuing land to the landless. The land was allotted despite the Forest Department’s objection.

More than 10 people have died in attacks by wild elephants here. Many residents abandoned their houses and only 20 families now remain in the colony.

The department has submitted a report seeking relocation of the remaining people at the colony. Two kumki elephants were deployed at Anayirangal dam, near Chinnakanal, to chase away wild elephants into the forest.

However, the effort was not successful. The kumki elephants returned after a few days.

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ELEPHANT HERD DESTROY CROPS IN LALPANIA

BOKARO: Elephants entered Chorgava village in Lalpania, on Wednesday and destroyed crops in several acres of farmland and demolished a villager’s boundary wall.

Almost 17 elephants entered the Maoist prone Gomia block from the neighbouring Ramgarh district. The elephants were last spotted in Luggu Hill’s foothills and are still present in the area. The presence of the herd during the ongoing paddy sowing time has created fear in the villagers.

The victims have asked the forest department for compensation against their losses from the elephant menace. “We are keeping a track notice on their movement and have also alerted the villagers,” P R Naidu, divisional forest, said. The residents said the elephants usually enter the village at night and damage houses and crops.

The DFO added that compensation will be provided to the victims. The villagers have decided to guard their farmland and prevent the elephants from entering the villages at night. “We are on alert and we will burst crackers, beat tin boxes and use torchlighst to keep them away,” Birbal Mahto, a villager, said.

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Elephant Stops And Eats Potatoes From Truck On Road

This is the moment a wild elephant stops a truck loaded with potatoes, removes the tarpaulin and begins munching on the goodies.

The astonishing video that currently has the internet amazed emerged from Garhbeta forest area in West Bengal in eastern India.

The 2-minute-long clip recorded on phones by other truck drivers shows the full grown elephant halting a truck on a national highway then smoothly removing the tarpaulin cover and taking potatoes from it.

The hungry animal's sudden snack break halted traffic and created panic among truck drivers who burst crackers to drive it away.

But the full grown elephant can clearly be seen undeterred by the screaming crowd creating a ruckus or bursting firecrackers near it as the determined jumbo keeps munching on its jackpot.

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

Elephant attacks 5 in Kolhapur district

KOLHAPUR: A group of five men who were passing through the forest were injured in an attack by a wild elephant near Sangshi village in Gaganbawada taluka of Kolhapur district on Tuesday evening. One of them has received grievous injuries.The forest department is considering the option to relocate the elephant in Karnataka.

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Two elephants electrocuted

UDHAGAMANDALAM: Two elephants died of electrocution in the Gudalur range forests in the Nilgiris on Friday. According to district forest officer PK Dilip, a herd of seven elephants were roaming in Kothadipudi area near Devarshola in Gudalur range early Friday. "While the elephants were trying to grab leaves from an areca nut tree, the tree fell on a live-wire and it snapped. One male elephant and a female elephant were electrocuted. It was an unfortunate accident," he said.

While the male elephant was about 12 years old, the female was about 15-20 years old, the official said. Forest staff rushed to the spot after the incident was reported by the public. "We found a herd of five elephants. Later, they were chased away into the forest," he added.

A post-mortem was conducted at the spot and samples were collected for lab test. The carcasses were left in the forest area for natural decay. Meanwhile, wildlife activists said trees close to electric posts on forest boundaries should be identified and removed to avoid such accidents.

"In places like Nilgiris, soil is of very soft and earth is mostly wet. Tall trees with thin trunk have shallow roots compared to indigenous trees here," said an activist. "If the forest department removes such trees growing close to electric posts, it will be in the interest of both humans and wild animals, especially elephants," he further said.

A forest department staff said the department was vigilant about high-voltage live-wire fencing erected illegally close to forest boundaries.

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13 thoroughfares across Indo-Bangla border for jumbos

India and Bangladesh have agreed to create 13 thoroughfares across the border fences in Assam and Meghalaya to let elephants make to-and-fro movements between the two countries, the officials said here today.

"Trans-border migration is a natural process and we have identified certain points (30 initially) but we have zeroed down to 13 points to allow to-and-fro migration of elephants in their natural habitats," India s Director General of Forests and Special Secretary to the Government of India Siddhanta Das told reporters.

At these identified thoroughfares for the jumbos, the fence would be broken and special gates would be built for their safe passage, he said.

Both the countries have also decided to constitute a Joint Working Group to draft protocols and Standard Operating Procedures for trans-boundary conservation and management of elephants and their movements between the two countries.

Das said 12 of these points are in Meghalaya and one in Assam and we do not want to create a barrier against the natural movement of the elephants.

The opening of the border fencing along the Indo- Bangladesh border for elephants is one of the 18 agreed points of action signed by top forests officials of both the countries at the 2nd Indo-Bangladesh dialogue for trans- boundary conservation of elephants here.

The other agreements included the one to discourage and regulate erection of electric fences for protection of agriculture and horticulture crops in the areas falling in the identified migratory corridors to prevent death of elephants from electrocution, he said.

District deputy commissioners of both the countries will also be empowered to permit trans-boundary movement of elephant rescue teams.

With both the countries having similar concerns for elephants, Das said, "Within 60 days, we will constitute a Joint Working Group to evolve and develop protocols and Standard Operating Procedures for trans-boundary conservation and management of elephants in India-Bangladesh landscape." He said the agreed action points should lead to signing of an official protocol between India and Bangladesh on trans-boundary conservation of elephants, Das said.

The third round of dialogue is expected to take place in Bangladesh by June next year.

The forest officials from the states of Assam, Meghalaya, West Bengal and Tripura and an 11-member team from Bangladesh attended the 2nd Indo-Bangladesh dialogue for trans-boundary conservation of elephants here and discussed at length on how best to coordinate the free, to-and-fro movements of the pachyderms across the international border and prevent their poaching.

"It was agreed (in 2015) to develop an operational guideline to handle trans-boundary movement of elephants and as a follow up action of this, dialogue is on and the protocol or else a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the two countries is expected soon," Bangladesh Chief Conservator of Forest, Md Shafiul Alam Chowdhury said.

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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Wild elephants target far-off villages

Wild elephants from Mundur forest reached Mamkurissi, 25km away, creating more problems for the people and forest officials.

The forest officials said this was the first time the wild elephants have entered deep into the villages, creating scare among people.

In the early hours of Saturday, a herd of wild elephants with a calf moved from Mundur to Mamkurissi via Ayyarmala and attacked people and houses.

They damaged the compound wall of Sundari of Tharuvakode. The elephants camped in the house compound of Krishnakumar of Kurrat, creating scare in the area.

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Wild tusker tramples to death 58-year-old

A 58-year-old man was trampled to death by a tusker at Oupada Mahadia village in the Dhenkanal Sadar forest range early today, the police said.

The incident occurred when Prasanna Kumar Baral was on his way to a field for attending to nature s call.

Local people said Baral came in the way of a wild tusker, which crushed him to death. The tusker is part of a herd of 10 to 12 elephants that had strayed into the human settlement yesterday.

Angry over the death, local people blocked National Highway-55 and demanded adequate
compensation for the family members of the killed.

The agitation was withdrawn after the district administration and forest department assured them of ensure compensation for the family of the slain, said ACF Jitendra Nath Das.

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Sunday, August 13, 2017

Carcass of elephant calf recovered from Bhavani river

Forest department officials recovered the carcass of a one-month-old male elephant from Bhavani River at Poochamarathur beat in Kobanari reserve forest coming under Karamadai forest range on Thursday. The calf was swept away in flash flood while crossing the river, department officials said.

A team of field staff, who were on routine rounds, had noticed the carcass. They alerted Karamadai forest range officer R Muthukrishnan, who rushed to the spot along with a team of field staff. Deputy director of forest veterinary NS Manoharan also reached the spot. A post-mortem was conducted at the spot and the carcass was cremated in the reserve forest area.

"Due to the southwest monsoon that began a few days ago, heavy rain is lashing the Western Ghats. Many rivers have heavy flows and flash floods. The elephant calf could not withstand the heavy flow in the Bhavani," said ranger Muthukrishnan.

Only the catchment area of Siruvani has received heavy rains, S Ramasubramanian, conservator of forest, Coimbatore circle, told TOI. "Many reserve forests in Coimbatore forest division did not get sufficient rain. However, elephant deaths due to starvation will come down due to the rain," he said.
Forest ranger officer from Boluvampatti forest range C Dineshkumar, said the department had imposed a ban on bathing at Kovai Courtallam for three days due to flash floods.

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Nationwide drive to protect elephant corridors, habitats

A massive awareness-cum-action campaign titled ‘Gaja Yatra’ that focuses on securing degraded elephant corridors and improving elephant habitat will be launched across the country on World Elephant Day on August 12.

Initiated by the Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) in association with the Government of India’s Project Elephant and Partners, Gaja Yatra will be a 15-month awareness campaign on the shrinking space for India’s wild elephants and the importance of elephant corridors.

One of the biggest events planned around India’s wild elephants, it will take place across multiple cities in India.

Talking to The Assam Tribune, actor-turned conservationist Dia Mirza, who is a founder member of WTI’s Club Nature and working closely with Gaja Yatra, said that the campaign, apart from reaching out to multiple stakeholders including those who lived near elephant habitat, would also help develop a mechanism for implementation of the mission’s objectives.

“Protection and restoration of elephant corridors is a key component of the campaign and we have identified 101 corridors for the purpose. Restoration is easier said than done, but we want to effect a change with active involvement of local communities,” she said.

Referring to the successful relocation of a village in Karbi Anglong for restoring an important elephant corridor on the Kaziranga-Karbi Anglong landscape three years back, Mirza said that the campaign would strive to replicate the successful conservation model in areas needing similar intervention.

“We will engage with local communities and also assist them with livelihood options for freeing elephant corridors,” she said.

In Assam and other parts of the Northeast, elephant habitat and corridors are shrinking drastically in the face of growing encroachment, tree-felling and commercial and industrial activities. This has also led to a spurt in the man-elephant conflict that has been taking a large toll on both elephant and human lives.

“Corridors apart, the need to save elephant habitat has never been as urgent as it is today. The problem is worsened by the fact that many elephant habitats fall outside protected forests like national parks and wildlife sanctuaries, rendering those more vulnerable to encroachment and deforestation. We are for a better mechanism that can ensure protection to reserved forests as well,” Mirza, who starred in several Bollywood blockbusters and was also a winner of Miss Asia Pacific Pageant, said.

Pointing out that the elephant had been a part of Indian folklore and culture, Mirza said that empowerment of communities living near elephant habitats could help mitigate the man-elephant conflict and protect elephant habitat.

“WTI has been working towards this for over a decade-and-a-half through ‘Right of Passage – National Elephant Corridors Project’, and we want to take it to the next level with Gaja Yatra,” she said.

Another crucial aspect, she added, is that Gaja Yatra would be in the form of a national movement and also encompass people who were not necessarily into conservation.

“We want to bring every person into the fold of this campaign. The message that elephant habitat needs protection must spread into every nook and corner for effective action to follow,” she said.

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Jharkhand forest authorities give order to kill elephant that killed 15 people

The forest authorities in Ranchi have given orders of shoot to kill for an elephant, that killed 15 persons in Bihar and Jharkhand since March this year. Currently, the elephant, a young adult aged around 25, has been spotted in Sahibganj district of Jharkhand. A hunter from Hyderabad has already arrived and is camping in the area for the purpose. The elephant had last killed two persons over two days on Monday and Tuesday.

Most of its victims have been members of the Paharia tribal – a primitive tribal group with a thin population of over 25,000 in the state, who live in the densely forested hills of Sahibganj district. According to the officials, the elephant entered Jharkhand from Bihar late in March. In between, it again crossed into Bihar and then returned to Jharkhand. Efforts made to tranquilise the elephants have not yielded results, even as casualties have occurred.

Jharkhand’s Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife) L R Singh said: “We have been trying to tranquilise and capture the elephant for nearly a fortnight. But it has not yielded results. On the other hand, casualties have taken place. Therefore, finally, we gave orders to shoot to kill the elephant.”

In order to get the task executed, the forest authorities have called Nawab Shafath Ali Khan of Hyderabad. He has already arrived in Jharkhand and camping with the team in Sahibganj. “He is among the most experienced names and is credited with culling neel gais in Bihar and killing a rogue elephant last year in the same state. He has been with us for the past few days. In fact, he has been trying to tranquilise and capture the elephant. But the terrain is proving to be the main difficulty,” said Singh. The effort would ensure least painful death.

The elephant is roaming in the Raj Mahal Hills in Taljhari, Borio and Sahibganj Blocks. “The visibility becomes less than 15 feet and the forest is so dense that entering it has not been possible. That is why we were forced to finally issue the orders for killing,” said Singh. The last sighting of the elephant was in a dense area in Taljhari Block, he said.

Recalling the elephant’s venture into Jharkhand, Singh said that, on March 24, the elephant entered Jharkhand from Bihar. “It had already killed three in Bihar and began killing people in Jharkhand. Then, in between, for a brief period, it re-entered Bihar and killed one more person. Later, it again returned to Jharkhand and has, so far, killed 11 persons in all,” he said. The last two killings took place on August 7 and 8.

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Wild elephants camp near railway track

With the three wild elephants, which had strayed into human settlements in Thrissur-Palakkad districts, being sighted near railway tracks in this village in Palakkad district, railways were excercising caution while running the trains.

“Orally instructions have been given to run the trains cautiously”, a railway official said.
Today two trains were delayed at Mankara station after the elephants were sighted near the tracks.
The forest department has been asked to inform the railways as and when the animals are sighted near the tracks following which the speed of the trains would be regulated, he said.

“We will also stop the trains to help the elephants pass the area “, he said.

The elephants are giving sleepless nights to the people, forest and police officials were trying to chase them back into the forest.

The elephants had strayed into the densely populated areas after crossing the national highway, Bharathapuzha river and railway lines in many parts.

Wildlife officials and police have been deployed in large numbers in the areas where the animals had been spotted.

Alerts have been issued to the public to confine themselves in their homes and not to assemble in large numbers near the elephants and provoke them.

The forest department also sought the help of trained persons to drive the pachyderms back to the forest.

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Bid to send back strayed wild elephants

Forests Minister K. Raju has said efforts are on to send back to the forest the three wild elephants roaming in the Thiruvilwamala in Thrissur and the nearby Palakkad borders in the last three days, with the help of two Kumki elephants from Tamil Nadu.

Replying to questions in the Assembly on Wednesday, the Minister said, “Giving tranquillizer shot to the elephants is not advisable as they may resort to rampant violence in human settlements. We will wait for a day and take further steps.”

The Minister said the department had decided to train eight more Kumki elephants to avoid hiring them from Tamil Nadu. The number of Rapid Response Team (RRT) had been increased from six to 13 and was still inadequate to handle emergencies. More vehicles and equipment would be given to the RRT and additional RRTs would be formed.

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15 people killed by a wild elephant in India

NEW DELHI: An elephant that has killed 15 individuals in eastern India over a months-in length frenzy could be shot inside days in the event that it is not brought under control, an authority said Wednesday.

Wildlife officers and hunters amassed in Jharkhand after another casualty was trampled to death Tuesday evening, the state’s main backwoods and untamed life conservator L.R. Singh told AFP.

The rebel elephant smashed four casualties in Bihar state in March before intersection into neighboring Jharkhand and slaughtering 11 more.

“Villagers are living in fear, particularly the Paharia tribe that lives on the upper hillier locales where the elephant wanders. Something must be done,” Singh stated, alluding to one of the poorest indigenous tribal groups in eastern India.

“We have a group of specialists and hunters here with us. We are conceptualizing an answer… one of them is to shoot the creature. In any case, that is the final resort and we will accept a bring in a day or two.”

The raiding elephant likely meandered from its crowd and ended up plainly lost, straying into towns where the killings occurred.

Elephants kill around 60 individuals consistently in forested Jharkhand, Singh stated, only a small amount of the evaluated 1,100 who passed on across the nation from elephant or tiger assaults in the three years to May.

The Environment ministry estimates an individual dies each day in India in conflicts with these jeopardized, wilderness abiding animals – by far most pulverized by elephants.

Rough encounters amongst elephants and people were increasing, said Singh, as immense swathes of timberland are cleared for human settlements or industry.

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Friday, August 11, 2017

Elephants' day out creates panic

 Specially trained Kumki elephants would be used for directing  the three wild tuskers, including a  tusker calf,  back to their abode in Malampuzha forest in Palakkad. The wild tuskers had been creating panic since Monday morning at Mankurissi and Peringottukurisi regions.  On the same night,  they travelled nearly 20 km  through hillocks and crossed small streams flowing to Bharathapuzha river and reached Pambady, Thiruvilwamala and Kuthampully regions in Thrisur near the river on Tuesday morning.

Chelakkara MLA U.R. Pradeep told DC that Forest Minister K. Raju had intervened in the matter and ordered the  DFOs concerned to bring in Kumki elephants which could direct the tuskers back to the forests through the same path they reached Bharathapuzha. “Most probably, the Kumki elephants will reach the Kuthampully area on Tuesday night and to avoid the issue of crowd coming in the way of operations, IPC 144 will be declared,”  he added.

Meanwhile, animal lover and Heritage Animal Task Force secretary V.K. Venkitachalam told DC that the forest department officials were inefficient in turning  the elephants through their passages back to Malampuzha forest as soon as they entered the residential areas like Kalladikodu near the forest.

“Instead of directing them back to the forest in the northern direction, the officials allowed the tuskers  to cross the Kozhikode-Palakkad highway on the southern side and they began their journey towards Bharatahapuzha. The police were  also inefficient in controlling the crowd that lit fire torches, blasted crackers and pelted stones at  the wild pachyderms by fully distracting the animals which prevented them from tracing back their passage back to the forest,” he added.

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3 wild jumbos stray into human settlements

Three wild elephants, which strayed into human settlements on the border villages of Thrissur-Palakkad districts since the past two days are giving sleepless nights to the people, even as forest and police officials are trying to chase them back into the forest.

The jumbos, including a tusker and a calf, were spotted in various areas in Thrissur-Palakkad districts.

According to local people, the animals were first spotted in Mundur and Parali areas of Palakkad yesterday and later found in Thiruvilwamala and adjacent places in Thrissur.

The elephants strayed into the densely populated areas after crossing the National Highway, Bharathapuzha river and railway lines in many parts, they said.

Wildlife officials have been deployed in large numbers in the areas where the animals had been spotted.

Alerts have been issued to the public to confine themselves in their homes and not to assemble in large numbers near the elephants and provoke them.

The forest department also sought the help of trained persons to drive the pachyderms back to the forest.

Animal rights campaigner V K Venkatachalam said the forest officials should have driven the elephants back to the same forest where they came from.

“The elephants might have come out of forest in search of food and water and they might have lost their way back to forest. Though three elephants were spotted earlier, the calf among them is said to be missing now,” he told PTI.

He also said the increasing presence of settlers in forest fringe areas act as a blockade for wild elephants to go back to forest.

“This incident highlights the urgent need to educate the forest department officials to use proper and scientific means of redirecting the path of movement of wild elephants, entering into human inhabited areas to their original path towards forest elephant corridors,” he added.

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Sunday, July 30, 2017

Trapped baby elephant desperately tries to pull itself out of a well using its TRUNK before villagers step in to help

Footage has emerged of an elephant desperately trying to pull itself out of a well after becoming trapped in the water.

The animal was spotted in the cemented well in a tea garden in Alipurduar, in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, after locals heard its terrified cries.

It is believed the elephant had been trying to drink the water before falling in and getting stuck.

The villagers raised the alarm and a rescue team from the forest and wildlife department was called to the scene.

Senior forest officer Kalayan Rai said: 'Elephants venture into the area to drink water from the wells built for irrigation purpose.

'We believe the calf was part of a herd which had come to drink water from the well.

'The animal might have fallen into the well as the water level was down and beyond its reach.'

In the video, the hapless elephant can be seen struggling in the muddy waters, trying to get out.

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Thursday, July 27, 2017

Carcass of elephant calf recovered from Bhavani river

COIMBATORE: Forest department officials recovered the carcass of a one-month-old male elephant from Bhavani River at Poochamarathur beat in Kobanari reserve forest coming under Karamadai forest range on Thursday. The calf was swept away in flash flood while crossing the river, department officials said.

A team of field staff, who were on routine rounds, had noticed the carcass. They alerted Karamadai forest range officer R Muthukrishnan, who rushed to the spot along with a team of field staff. Deputy director of forest veterinary NS Manoharan also reached the spot. A post-mortem was conducted at the spot and the carcass was cremated in the reserve forest area.

"Due to the southwest monsoon that began a few days ago, heavy rain is lashing the Western Ghats. Many rivers have heavy flows and flash floods. The elephant calf could not withstand the heavy flow in the Bhavani," said ranger Muthukrishnan.

Only the catchment area of Siruvani has received heavy rains, S Ramasubramanian, conservator of forest, Coimbatore circle, told TOI. "Many reserve forests in Coimbatore forest division did not get sufficient rain. However, elephant deaths due to starvation will come down due to the rain," he said.
Forest ranger officer from Boluvampatti forest range C Dineshkumar, said the department had imposed a ban on bathing at Kovai Courtallam for three days due to flash floods.

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Elephant dies in M'bazar

A pet elephant, who suffered injuries in her waist seven days back, died at Bridge No. 5 of Moulvi-bazar Road in Sreemangal upazila on Friday morning.

Sirajul Islam, owner of the elephant, said a resident of Brahmanbaria district rented 'Rajlaxmi' several months back. On July 14, Sirajul brought Rajlaxmi back to Sreemangal. However, she received injuries in her waist while getting off a truck adjacent to Bridge  No. 5 of Moulvibazar Road.

Later, veterinary doctors  of Sreemangal Livestock Services Department gave treatment to Rajlaxmi in consultation with the doctors of Bangladesh National Zoo and Duluhazar Safari Park surgeon Dr Arifur Rahman.

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PETA up in arms against jumbo rides

Raising their voice against ill-treatment of elephants during jumbo rides at Rajasthans famous Amber Fort, animal rights body PETA has filed a complaint with Jaipur police against unidentified men in this regard.

The intervention comes after a group of tourists wrote to the animal rights body regarding one such incident at the fort.

The People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has also urged the Rajasthan government to end elephant rides in Amber Fort.

Based on the complaint by the body, an FIR was registered against unidentified men under IPC sections 429 and 289 (mischief by killing or maiming an animal).

In the FIR, PETA stated that approximately eight men ran out with sticks and an iron ankus, and encircled the elephant and kicked the animal for more than 10 minutes. The pachyderm was trying to escape from giving forced rides in extreme heat.

"Forcing an elephant to give rides through the use of weapons and in the searing heat is cruel but common at Amber Fort," says PETA Chief Executive Officer, Manilal Valliyate.

PETAs complaint also included violation of sections under major animal protection laws namely, Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960 and Performing Animals (Registration) Rules (PARR), 2001.

The animal rights body also urged Rajasthan Tourism Development Corporation (RTDC), which permits and promotes elephant rides, to put an end to these rides, saying they were "illegal".

"PETA is calling for the perpetrators to be punished and the Rajasthan government to end elephant rides in Amber Fort and elsewhere in the state. Mechanised and eco-friendly safari vehicles can be used instead," said Valliyate.

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Minister assures steps to prevent jumbos from straying into villages

Government will not spare any efforts to put an end to the elephants attacking the villages to prevent loss of life and crops, said  Industries Minister N Amaranatha Reddy.

As part of the measures to check elephants straying into villages, trenches will be dug around the forest in Palamaner, Baireddypali and Bangarupalem mandals which are facing the elephant menace, the Minister said.

Trenches will be dug around the forests to keep the elephants away from villages and to protect crops  
 Initially the work will be taken up in 18-km stretch and the trenches will be of 10 feet depth
 Speaking to the media after inaugurating the trench work near Kaluvapalli on the forest fringe in Palamaner mandal on Sunday, the Minister said to begin with 18-km stretch trench which will be 10-feet deep and wide will be dug in the strategic forest area bordering the three mandals where the elephant menace is more.

This apart, the forest department will take up tree plantation and construction of water harvesting structures in a big way under `Vanam-Manam’ programme in the forests so as to improve fodder position and also water availability inside the forests. This is to prevent the elephants straying into human habitation in search of food and water, he explained.

On the recent elephant attack on villages in Chinnagottigallu and Yerravaripalem mandals, he said the forest authorities visited the villages and initiated measures to drive the elephants back into deep forests.

The Minister who earlier participated in series of development initiatives at various places in the mandal claimed that under the TDP government, the rural area in the State is witnessing a massive development works going on which was never so after independence.

He said all the villages in Chittoor district will be covered under LED streetlights by 2019 and added that the much awaited Handri-Niva waters will reach the district after completion of the project by this year end.

Reddy called on the farmers to adopt technology to improve their agriculture income and went on explaining the efforts being taken by the government to promote latest technology in the farm sector TDP MLC G Srinivasulu and others were present.

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Man trampled to death by elephant in Chhattisgarh

Korba: A 40-year-old man was today trampled to death by an elephant in Chhattisgarh’s Korba district, a forest official said.

The victim, Ramcharan, came face-to-face with the tusker early this morning near his native Botli village when he had gone to pick mahua fruits in the Kartala forest range, he said. The man tried to escape from the spot but the pachyderm chased him and smashed him to the ground with its trunk before trampling him to death, the official said.

Upon getting information about the incident, the villagers rushed Ramcharan to Kartala community health centre where he succumbed during treatment, he said.

The kin of the deceased have been given an instant relief amount of Rs 25,000, the official said adding that the remaining compensation will be disbursed soon after completion of the necessary formalities. Several incidents of human-elephant conflict have been reported in the past from the thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, consisting of Surguja, Surajpur, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur, Balrampur and Korea districts.

The region has witnessed several killings of tribals and widespread damage to houses and crops by rogue elephants.

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Cruelty to elephant cops file fir against unidentified persons

Jaipur: Following a complaint filed by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) against handlers ill-treating an elephant during rides at the Amber Fort, Jaipur police registered a First Information Report (FIR) against unidentified men.

FIR has been registered under sections 429 and 289 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) for ill-treating an elephant and putting public safety at risk. In its complaint, PETA stated that on June 25, about eight men ran out with sticks and an iron ‘ankush’ – a torture device, which is restricted from use by Rajasthan High Court – and encircled the elephant, who had tried to escape from being forced to give rides in the extreme heat.

The men reportedly beat up the helpless animal for more than 10 minutes and continued doing so even after the elephant had stopped trying to escape. A group of American tourists, who were a witness to this, wrote to PETA, asking the group to take action against this cruelty. TOI had reported the incident on June 26, 2017.

In its complaint to Rajasthan Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (RTDC), which permits and promotes elephant rides, PETA urged to put an end to the rides, as they are apparently illegal. The PETA complaint referred to the orders dated December 9, 2014 and September 28, 2015 of the High Court of Kerala, which mandated that, elephants used for rides where public is admitted by sale of tickets must be registered under PARR, 2001 and that, the elephants used for rides in Amber Fort and elsewhere in Rajasthan are not registered as per the mandate of these court orders.

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Monday, July 24, 2017

Carcass of 10-year old elephant found in forests

A highly decomposed carcass of a male elephant was found in the forests of Sirumugal in the ditrict today.

The body of the elephant, aged about 12 years, was noticed by the forest department staff.
Non-availability of food and water was suspected to be the rason for the death, forest department sources said.

After postmortem, the elephant was buried in the forests, they said.

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Elephant with badly broken leg limps across road on three legs without any pain relief

Witnesses who spotted the animal wincing in pain are calling on officials to track down the wild animal so it can be taken for treatment.

This is the heartbreaking moment a young elephant was spotted dragging its badly broken leg around as it suffers without any pain relief.

The 'baby Dumbo' has reportedly been spotted numerous times, clearly in agony, as he limps on his three good legs - but nobody seems to be in a rush to help him.

In the last sighting, the elephant was filmed trying to cross a road with his broken front left leg, wincing as he places any weight on it before scurrying back into the woods.

The enormous creature had been spotted a number of times carrying the injury near forests in Karnataka, India.

Residents are now appealing for the local forestry officials to find the elephant and send it to vets for treatment.

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Indian train kills 3 elephants

Three elephants have been killed after being hit by a passenger train in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, a senior railway official said on Saturday.

The incident took place when the three—two female adults and a calf—were crossing railway tracks near Bishnupur in the state’ s Bankura district Friday night, the official said. Train movement in the area was affected for hours before being finally restored this morning, he said, adding a probe has been ordered into the incident.

Elephants often die of accidental electrocutions, poaching, poisoning by farmers to prevent them from damaging crops and after being run over by trains across India.

While elephants are worshipped by many in India, shrinking habitat has led to increased conflict with people and the deaths of many of the protected animals.

There are around 26,000 wild elephants in India, where it is a heritage animal.

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Sunday, July 23, 2017

Jumbos sighted at 4,000 feet in Uttarakhand hills, residents on alert

NAINITAL: The unprecedented sighting of elephants in Jeolikot, 18 km from Nainital town, at an altitude of 1,219 metres (nearly 4,000 feet) has left residents worried. The forest department is patrolling the area and has cautioned residents to avoid confrontation with the pachyderms. Last year, camera trap images had shown a tiger prowling in Askot, in the upper reaches of Pithoragarh, at altitudes of over 12,000 feet, which is unusual for tigers and is the normal habitat of snow leopards.
Anil Kumar Singh, a specialist in man-elephant conflict who is currently working with World Wildlife Federation India in the Terai Arc Landscape which comprises several protected eco-systems in India and Nepal, told TOI, "The elephant is a long-range animal and tends to explore new habitats if any sort of disturbance is caused in its current habitat. In this case, the reason might be the disturbances in the Gaula elephant corridor."

Experts confirmed that in Uttarakhand it is for the first time that elephants have been seen at such altitudes. The animals, they said, can climb to high altitudes, but cannot manage steep slopes. In the hills, they prefer areas with gentle inclines and abundant food.

AG Ansari, a conservationist from Uttarakhand, said, "Various factors such as laying of railway tracks and road networks disturb elephants' habitat and they tend to move to other areas. But in this case the main reason is disturbance in the Gaula elephant corridor. An average elephant eats 70-80 kg of vegetation in 18-20 hours, which explains its need for food. And when a corridor is disturbed the animal has no option other than looking for food somewhere else."

The Gaula elephant corridor stretches around 20 km from Haldwani forest division to Terai central forest division. Uttarakhand has 11 elephant corridors at present, of which many are under pressure due to urbanization, encroachment and human interventions in the natural habitat of animals. According to the last census in 2015, Uttarakhand has a total elephant population of 1,797.

Parag Madhukar Dhakate, conservator of forests, western circle, said, "Migration of elephants to such altitudes is new to us in the state. There may be several reasons for this, including exploration for food and habitat. We are maintaining vigil and patrolling the area and have cautioned residents to avoid any sort of conflict."

In 2015, the Union environment ministry set up a panel to study elephant migration, aimed at preventing human-elephant conflict, which results in around 400 human deaths every year. India started Project Elephant in 1992 to protect Asian elephants, their habitat and corridors and address man-elephant conflict.

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Saturday, July 22, 2017

Bihar worried as wild elephants obstruct flood protection measures in Kusaha, Nepal

Wild elephants are seriously obstructing the Bihar government’s flood protection measures in the Kusaha area of Nepal, about 12 km north of Birpur, a border town in Supaul district, which are crucial for the well being of vast areas of north Bihar.

For, it was in Kusaha that the eastern afflux bund (embankment) on the Kosi river had been breached in August 2008, causing widespread devastation in five districts of north Bihar as well as in some parts of the Himalayan country. The catastrophe had claimed almost 500 lives and affected over three million people.

Officials engaged in flood protection measures said elephants inhabiting the nearby protected forest zone frequently came out of their abode and blocked the mobility of men and machinery deployed by the Bihar water resources department (WRD), alongside the afflux bund.

“These elephants cause damage to anti-flood structures like spurs, which have been built to deflect strong current of water and minimise the river’s impact on the embankment,” said a source overseeing the flood protection measures.

The wild elephants have also been demolishing camp offices set up by the department to protect the 32 km long eastern afflux bund, constructed on the upstream of the Kosi. The structure has been built to check the increased level of water caused by the construction of Birpur barrage on the river.

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Friday, July 21, 2017

Census reveals presence of 1976 wild elephants in Odisha: Routray

A latest elephant census report has revealed the presence of 1976 wild elephants in Odisha, State Forest and Environment Minister Bijayshree Routray said here today. Mr Routray told newspersons here that the number of elephants has increased by 22 in comparison to census conducted in 2015 last.He said the number of wild elephants in 2017 included 344 male, 1092 female and 502 young elephants .The sex of 38 elephants,however, could not be identified. He said out of the total 43 divisions covered in the census, 37 divisions recorded elephants during the census period. Mr

Routray said 1949 census units were formed and 5847 persons were engaged in the census work. In addition to the regular staff wildlife enthusiasts, NGOs, Research Scholars, Academicians also participated in the elephant census conducted from May 9 to 12 last. The Minister said 1536 elephants comprising of 77.73 per cent of the total 1976 elephants were found in three elephant reserves Mayurbhanj (635), Mahanadi ( 694) and Sambalpur ( 207) which have altogether seven sanctuaries. Five other sanctuaries have 79 elephants which constitutes 3.99 per cent of the total elephant populations.

During the census 27 elephants were found in Parlakhemundi division including Lakhari sanctuary, 30 in Baliguda Division including Kotagarh sanctuary, two in Kalahandi South Division including Karlapat sanctuary, one Chandka Wildlife Division including Chandka sanctuary and 19 in Hirakud Wildlife Division including Debrigarh sanctuary. As many as 361 elephants comprising of 18.26 per cent were found outside the elephant reserves and outside the sanctuaries, the Minister said adding that highest number of 330 elephants were found in Similipal core area followed by 169 in Dhenkanal.

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Monday, July 17, 2017

Villagers save baby elephant after it fell into water tank

The elephant had fallen into the water tank in southern India.
A drowning baby elephant was pulled to safety by villagers after it fell into a water tank.

The dramatic rescue of the five-month-old calf was captured on video in Tamil Nadu, southern India, earlier this month.

The male calf is believed to have fallen into the tank while trying to drink some water, or run in while scared, and then been unable to free himself.

He had made it to the outskirts of Naickenpalayam from nearby Nilgiris Biosphere Reserve in Periyanaickenpalayam with a herd of eight elephants, according to the Mail Online.

Forest ranger Palaniraja said: ‘On June 11, we received information from the villagers that three wild elephants were raiding fields at Rayaruthupathi near Naickenpalayam on the outskirts of the city in the early hours of June 11.

It was reunited with its herd after the dramatic rescue.

Six villagers were involved in pulling it to safety. ‘We rushed to the spot along with a team of anti-poaching watchers.’

Video footage shows six villagers tugging the elephant calf out of the water by its legs and trunk.

It was later reunited with the herd that had remained nearby.

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Elephant stops traffic in town in India

One large, unexpected visitor accidentally wandered its way into a town in India.

This elephant caused quite the scare as it made its way through some fields before stopping traffic when it crossed a highway.

The elephant eventually made its way back to the forest with help from police and forest officials.

Increasing human population has depleted the wild animals’ habitat and forced them to stray into populated areas in search of food and water.

In some instances, the elephants have attacked people and often been killed in return.

Luckily, in this case, there was no property damage and no one was hurt during the incident.

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Saturday, July 15, 2017

Gajraj was brought to the royal family of Aundh, Satara, at the age of 12 from the wild in 1965

After five decades as a slave as a temple elephant with a royal family in Maharashtra, a 70-year-old male elephant, Gajraj, was rescued by the state forest department and NGOs on Wednesday. He will be sent to an elephant rehabilitation centre in Mathura. Gajraj reached Madhya Pradesh on Thursday, and will reach Mathura on Saturday.

Gajraj was brought to the royal family of Aundh, Satara, at the age of 12 from the wild in 1965, as a gift to the queen at her wedding. He was made to travel 800-kilometres from Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, to Satara, Maharashtra, which took almost a-month-and-a-half.

The rescue operation on Wednesday, led by NGO Wildlife SOS, was marred by locals from the village as they pelted stones at the rescue team since the elephant was an icon of worship, and was made to perform duties at the temple and during various festivals. “Our entire team was in a lot of danger as we were attacked by stones, but police presence helped us move the elephant and our team to safety,” said Wasim Akram, Wildlife SOS coordinator.

According to the elephant’s current medical examination, Gajraj developed partial blindness and a toenail abscess which could spread to the bone. He also has abscesses in the hip and his foot pads suffered severe degeneration. “Being chained for most of his life has had a detrimental effect on Gajraj’s health. He has lost weight and has nutritional deficiencies,” said Dr Yaduraj Khadpekar, senior veterinarian, Wildlife SOS.

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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Kerala turns ‘unsafe’ for captive elephants

Ailments, torture, lack of care, and medical negligence are taking a toll on captive elephants, claim animal rights activists. The death of four animals in the past three weeks has taken the death toll of captive elephants to 14 this year.

The latest being Thripunithura Poornathrayeesan Narayanan, which died on Tuesday at Kokkarni Parambu, Thrissur, where elephants of the Cochin Devaswam Board (CDB) are tethered.

“It had no teeth and had been starving for the past 60 days. The elephant was tethered in dirty surroundings without veterinary care,” alleged V.K. Venkitachalam, secretary, Heritage Animal Task Force.

Another elephant, Periyanampetta Parameswaran, 38, died inside the Periyanampetta temple complex, near Ottappalam, two days ago. Though the elephant had injuries in its hind legs, it was forced to stand on granite floor, the task force complained in a letter to the Director of Project Elephant, Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF).

Elephant Junior Achuthan, 28, of the Guruvayur Devaswom died on June 7 and Aranmula Parthasarathy, 48, of the Travancore Devaswom, died on June 22.

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Cruelty to elephant: PETA writes to forest dept for action

Jaipur: After Sunday's incident at Amber Fort where an American tourist, Nayiri Miller, witnessed eight persons ill-treating an elephant, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), India has written to Rajasthan Forest Department. In the letter, PETA has urged the chief wildlife warden (CWLW) to register an FIR against the abusers urgently and take the tusker for immediate veterinary care and rehabilitation.

"Reports on Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) authorised inspections carried out in Goa, Jaipur, and Rajasthan have unquestionably proved that captive elephants suffer mentally and physically when used in such exhibits. In 2014, an inspection report submitted by a team of experienced veterinarians and honorary animal welfare officers authorized by AWBI revealed that invalid ownership certificates, partially and nearly blind elephants who had been forced to work and the use of iron ankuses (rods with a sharp metal hook on one end) to control the animal," said Dr Manilal Valliyate, Director of Veterinary Affairs, PETA India.

The report further says, Elephant Village or Hathigaon, where many elephants are kept like zoo, doesn't have authorization from Central Zoo Authority.

"In the case of The Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) vs State of Kerala & ors (WP(C) No 10424 of 2014), the High Court of Kerala, in its order dated December 9, 2014, mandated that elephants used for rides must be registered under the Performing Animals (Registration) Rules, 2001," wrote Dr Manilal.

Besides, in violation of the directives of Rajasthan High Court, ankus wounds on elephants, severe foot problems caused by forcing the animals to stand and work on concrete are seen on elephants who were kept chained or tightly tethered and are made to live alone in barren concrete cells.


"Given the cruelty to elephants inherent in these rides, the compassionate stance taken by travellers and renowned travel agencies along with apparent violations of rules relating to registration and permitted weight limits, we request that you end elephant rides in Amber Fort and elsewhere in Rajasthan and instead promote the use of mechanized, eco-friendly safari vehicles," said Dr Manilal.


"We also ask that you call for these captive elephants to be transferred immediately to a sanctuary, where they can get necessary veterinary treatments, move freely, can stretch, exercise and enjoy the company of other elephants," he said.


Now, Amber Management & Development Authority (AD&MA) has de-rostered the elephant from rides at Amber Fort till DCF, Amber submits his report.

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Ageing temple elephant sent to care home in Mathura

Seventy-year-old Gajraj is finally free after being rescued by animal rights activists, and is being transferred to the lifetime care of Wildlife SOS at their Elephant Care and Conservation Center (ECCC) in Mathura.

Wildlife SOS rescued the elephant from Aundh in Satara district amidst heavy police protection with cooperation from the Forest Department.

The elephant, belonging to the Queen of Aundh, was used in temple processions for over 51 years.

With advancing age, the elephant was found to be suffering from several medical issues like foot abscess, partial blindness etc.

Gajraj performed his duties for over five decades as a temple elephant where local devotees saw him as an icon of worship, as he played an important role in festivities and temple processions.

His long journey as a temple elephant came to an abrupt end on Thursday, as he finally retired and was moved in an ambulance from Satara to Mathura for his long-term medical treatment and lifetime care.

A PETA campaign brought attention to Gajraj’s plight.

A medical examination had revealed that Gajraj required medical attention for his toenail abscess, which could spread to the bone in addition to the hip abscesses, while his foot pads suffered severe degeneration. This made him a candidate for geriatric life time care at the Wildlife SOS Elephant Center.

The royal family of Aundh gave him a warm farewell. The local villagers, however, became very emotional and hostile.

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55-yr-old man suffers multiple fractures in elephant attack

A 55-year-old man suffered multiple fractures after being flung by an elephant at Karaiyur near pargur hill area in this district late last night.

Police said Mathan was fast sleep on a raised platform in front of his house when a lone elephant picked him up and flung him away

He suffered fracture in his hands, legs and wrists and has been admitted to Anthiyur government hospital for treatment, they said.

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A herd of Elephant ransack the Maniram Jote Village, Naxalbari

Siliguri: A herd of elephants were seen at Maniram Jote, Naxalbari, today morning.
A herd of elephants is called a parade. Elephants naturally live in herds with linear and established social orders. They require large areas in which to raise families, breed, travel, forage and live.

The Herd of elephants has been raiding and ransacking the ripe crops at Maniram Jote, Naxalbari since couple days back.The herds of elephant destroyed paddy, sugarcane, pineapple crops along the Maniram Jote fields and adjacent areas.

Farmers have been complaining of the very encroachment before the forest department in multiple occasions. Authorities were present on the spot and the herd of elephants have been diverted.

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Sunday, July 09, 2017

Elephant electrocuted

A wild adult elephant has died after coming in contact with a high voltage wire dangling low above the ground in a forest area under Sonapur range.

According to sources, a group of elephants were seen moving around in residential areas at Bejni in search of food during the last few days. Local people found the dead jumbo this morning and informed to the forest department. After the post-mortem examinations, the pachyderm was buried on the spot.

The local people have alleged that the elephant’s death was a result of the negligence of authorities of the forest and electricity departments.

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Two labourers injured in wild elephant attack

Madikeri: Two labourers were injured when a wild elephant attacked them while working in a coffee estate in Chennayyanakote near Siddapura on Wednesday.

It is said that when a group of four women were working in the coffee estate, a tusker abruptly attacked them. The injured Nabisa (45) and Nasima (40) have been shifted to Madikeri district hospital after providing first aid in Siddapura PHC. Forest officers visited the spot and promised to give all the expenses of medical treatment.

It may be recalled here that just a month ago, a labourer was killed by wild elephants in Badaga Banangala near Siddapura. According to forest department sources, a total of 5 persons have died due to elephant attacks so far during the last six months.

The villagers have been frequently protesting demanding the translocation of elephants in Virajpet taluk. The department also sent a proposal of Rs 650 Crore to the state government to erect solar and railway gate fence to prevent wild elephants' trespass into human habitats.

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Man trampled to death by wild elephant in Odisha

A man was trampled to death by a wild elephant near a forest area in Odisha’s Dhenkanal district, officials said today.

The tusker attacked Shyamsundar Patra (55) near his house at village Atinda late last night killing him on the spot, Ranger of Sadangi forest range, Ashok Kumar Bhanja said.

A total of Rs 10,000 was given to the family of the deceased as immediate assistance, while the body was sent for post-mortem, the forest officer said.

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50-yr-old elephant foud dead on banks of Bhavani river

A 50-year-old female elephant was found dead today on the banks of the Bhavani River in Mettupalayam in the district, two days after it was treated for fatigue.

Forest department officials found the female elephant lying in a fatigued condition in Koothamandi beat of Sirumugai forest near Mettupalayam two days ago.

As it was lying still, forest veterinarian Dr Manoharan provided treatment and administered iron tonic, glucose and other supplementary drugs,department sources said.

The elephant returned to near normalty, following which it was made to stand with the help of a crane and given fruits and medicines, they said.

After a few hours, it went to the jungle on its own and joined its herd yesterday evening.
However, the pachyderm was found dead near the river this morning, they said.
Veterinary doctors did a post-mortem and buried the carcass there, they said.

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Woman killed by elephant

In two wildlife related incidents in Uttarakhand, a woman was trampled by an elephant in Haridwar whereas two poachers were nabbed from Tehri district of the state.

Victim Savitri Devi, 55, a resident of Uttam Basti in Haridwar had gone to collect fire wood on Wednesday inside adjoining Rajaji Tiger reserve when an elephant attacked her on the Kharkari compartment of the reserve killing her on the spot. When she did not return home, Savitri’s husband Brijendra went for a search but could not find her. Today forest guards recovered the body of Savitri from the reserve.

In another incident, two poachers were arrested from Tehri district of the state and two tusks were seized from them. The two were identified as Saeed  and Bhundu,  hailing from Bijnor district. The two tusks weighed around 10 kg.

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Two killed in elephant attack in Cooch Behar

TWO PERSONS died and one sustained injuries when a wild elephant went on a rampage at Konamali village in Cooch Behar on Monday morning. “Two people were attacked by a wild elephant. They both died,” said Cooch Behar SP Anup Jaiswal. The deceased have been identified as Upen Burman (66) and Mahindranath Rai (73).

Sources in the police said both were on way to their fields when they were attacked by the elephant. “Burman was the first one to be attacked, when he tried to chase the elephant. He died on the spot. Then the elephant attacked Rai. Like Burman, he too was flung in the air and died at the spot,” said a source.

Another person, Sanjay Rai, who was present nearby, had a narrow escape as the elephant got distracted by the sound of another animal and moved away, he added. “Soon after, villagers, police personnel and forest officials rushed to the spot. The injured person was taken to Cooch Behar MJN Hospital. He is stated to be stable.” The elephant was heading towards the jungles of Alipurduar, said eyewitnesses.

Additional District Forest Official Raju Roy told mediapersons: “We received a call around 5 am about an elephant entering Konamoli area and then rushed to the spot. First, it attacked Upen Burman. Then, the wild elephant, who was heading towards Maheshbari, attacked Mahendra Nath Rai. Police have recovered both the bodies. The elephant had also damaged a house.”

“We are strengthening vigilance to ensure that no such man-animal conflicts occur again,” he added. According to government data, last year, 108 people had died due to human-elephant conflict in the state.

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Ailing elephant dies at Kaziranga

 The ailing elephant, Rajdhan, which was lifted yesterday with the help of an excavator by a team of veterinary doctors from CWRC, Kaziranga, died at around 10:30 last night, informed one of the veterinary doctors, who was giving treatment to the ailing elephant since the last few days. He added that the elephant died of suspected food poisoning, which might have led to severe toxicity inside his body.

It is worth mentioning here that the elephant could be lifted yesterday from the spot in Panbari village after more than 12 days with the help of an excavator. Since there was no visible symptom of any kind of disease, veterinary experts believed that the elephant would soon be able to walk without any support and become normal. But unfortunately, it died yesterday due to severe toxicity. A final report will be available after the post-mortem is completed, said one of the veterinary doctors.

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Friday, July 07, 2017

Elephants enter mango orchard at Garh Salboni

 A group of six elephants have entered a mango orchard at Garh Salboni about 11-km from here, Forest department officials said today.
The elephants are eating the mangoes and jackfruit of the orchard. The local people tried to drive them away from the mango orchard but the elephants are refusing to leave the orchard, the officials said.
Divisional Forest Officer (Jhargram) Basab Raj Holichhi said the elephants are staying in the mango orchard at Garh Salboni as it has adequate water and food.
The DFO said the Forest officials are tying to drive away the elephants from the mango orchard to the forest.
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Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Elephant tramples family to death during rampage

An elephant went on a wild rampage in India on Friday, trampling four people to death — including a 12-year-old girl as she slept inside her home, according to reports.

The girl was sleeping in the veranda of her house in Ganeshapuram, Coimbatore, when the massive male pachyderm — which had recently strayed into encroaching human habitation from nearby Madukkarai forests — barged inside around 3:30 a.m., killing her, The Hindu reported.

“The elephant first entered a house and attacked a family that was asleep. It lifted a 12-year girl with its trunk and flung her to the ground, causing her to die on the spot,” district official S Madhuranthangi told the Australian Associated Press.

The girl’s father, Vijayakumar, also suffered a hand fracture, the Hindu reported.

The mammal then strayed into a residential area on the outskirts of the city of Coimbatore, where it claimed three more victims, according to the Australian Associated Press.

“It trampled two women and a 70-year-old man to death in separate attacks later,” a witness said.

The women had been relieving themselves in an open field before the fatal stampede, NDTV reported.

Two other people were injured during the attack and have been hospitalized, The Hindustan reported.

Forest department officials told the news site that they are attempting to drive the elephant back into the forest by bringing in kumkis — or tamed elephants — and trying to tranquilize it.

Data from India’s environment ministry reveals that 391 people and 39 elephants died across the country from 2014-15, as a result of conflicts between humans and the animals, the site reported.

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Monday, July 03, 2017

Hundreds Of Villagers Jump Into Action To Save An Elephant Swept Away By Flood

An elephant lost her family and nearly lost her life, before being saved in a daring rescue. The elephant had an entire village of people dedicated to seeing her rescue through.

The elephant became the victim of an extremely unlucky situation when she was swept away from her herd in the midst of historic monsoon flooding in Assam, an Indian state located in the northeast region of the country.

The flooding was so strong, it was impossible for the elephant to swim against the currents. Conservationists believe the elephant was swept through the river for more than 600 miles. From Assam to the neighboring country of Bangladesh.

Wildlife officials from both India and Bangladesh spent weeks trying to secure the elephant. She washed ashore in Bangladesh, and was stranded in a secluded, flood area.

Thankfully, the stressed elephant had access to rice crops, sugar cane and some banana plants to survive on while waiting to be saved.

Officials from India’s forestry department were finally able to safely make the journey to Bangladesh in order rescue the elephant in need. But the effort was easier said than done.

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Friday, June 30, 2017

Elephant tramples family to death during rampage

An elephant went on a wild rampage in India on Friday, trampling four people to death — including a 12-year-old girl as she slept inside her home, according to reports.

The girl was sleeping in the veranda of her house in Ganeshapuram, Coimbatore, when the massive male pachyderm — which had recently strayed into encroaching human habitation from nearby Madukkarai forests — barged inside around 3:30 a.m., killing her, The Hindu reported.

“The elephant first entered a house and attacked a family that was asleep. It lifted a 12-year girl with its trunk and flung her to the ground, causing her to die on the spot,” district official S Madhuranthangi told the Australian Associated Press.

The girl’s father, Vijayakumar, also suffered a hand fracture, the Hindu reported.

The mammal then strayed into a residential area on the outskirts of the city of Coimbatore, where it claimed three more victims, according to the Australian Associated Press.

“It trampled two women and a 70-year-old man to death in separate attacks later,” a witness said.
The women had been relieving themselves in an open field before the fatal stampede, NDTV reported.

Two other people were injured during the attack and have been hospitalized, The Hindustan reported.
Forest department officials told the news site that they are attempting to drive the elephant back into the forest by bringing in kumkis — or tamed elephants — and trying to tranquilize it.

Data from India’s environment ministry reveals that 391 people and 39 elephants died across the country from 2014-15, as a result of conflicts between humans and the animals, the site reported.

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Elephant calf found dead inside army camp

A female elephant calf was found dead in a drain at Narangi Military Station here today. A Defence spokesperson said the calf was spotted stuck in a drain inside the military premise this morning. As no movement was observed in the pachyderm, forest department was promptly informed.

A team of forest officials on arrival at the site of the incident declared the animal dead, most likely due to suffocation on being stuck in the drain. Exact veterinary cause of death will be ascertained after the finalisation of the Post-Mortem report, the spokesperson added.

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Rogue elephant released into the wild, alert on

Coimbatore: The 18-year-old rogue elephants that rampaged through the outskirts of the city early on Friday killing four people, injuring an equal number and spreading terror was released into the reserve forest at Anaikundhi near Varagaliyar elephant camp the same night. It had been captured by the forest department in a nine-hour operation. The forest department has deployed more than 20 anti-poaching watchers (APWs) led by a forest ranger at the Anaikundhi area to monitor the tusker.

Initially the department planned to keep the animal in a krawl (a wooden enclosure where captured wild elephants are confined for training) in the Varagaliyar elephant camp. However, after forest department officials discussed the matter with forest department minister Dindigul C Srinivasan, it was decided to release the animal into the reserve forest.

The captured male elephant was transported to the Varagaliyar elephant camp from Vellalapalayam near Vellalore in Coimbatore and later taken 5 km away in a truck and released around 11.30 pm on Friday.

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Elephant found dead in Tanda forest

The body of an elephant was recovered from the Tanda forest area of Kitcha in Udham Singh Nagar district of the state.

Sources in the Forest Department said the elephant was killed after it came in contact with a live electricity wire. Sub-Divisional Forest Officer Umesh Tiwari said the elephant died of electrocution. He said the elephant came in contact with the electricity wire that had been put as fencing across an agriculture field in Tanda resulting in the pachyderm’s death.

Only a fortnight ago, an injured elephant was recovered from Rajaji Tiger Reserve. It was recovered from Dhaulkhand range of Rajaji. The forest authorities administered treatment to the injured elephant.

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India’s fierce elephant kills 9 people in two years and is sent to the training center

According to the British “Daily Mail” reported on June 1st, India Kerala Attappadi forest reserve a 40 year old elephant within two years caused 9 deaths. In May 29th, it was finally sedated and sent to a nearby wildlife training center. On the same day, the elephant was eating grass near the river and the workers were lurking near it ready to start the hunt.

 First, a vet gave it a tranquilizer. Then, 4 specially trained elephants crowded round it without letting it wander about. However, the potion didn’t work properly, and it started attacking the 4 elephants. The vet quickly injected him with a tranquilizer. After the elephant completely lost consciousness, people tied it with ropes and carried it to the wildlife training center.

According to reports, the tension process of arrest for 6 hours, the relevant personnel to labor, but the elephant has been sent to the safety training center, will not be around.

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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Killer jumbo captured, released into forest

COIMBATORE: The 18-year-old rogue elephant that rampaged through the outskirts of the city early on Friday killing four people, injuring an equal number and spreading terror was released into the reserve forest at Anaikundhi near Varagaliyar elephant camp the same night. It had been captured by the forest department in a nine-hour operation. The forest department has deployed more than 20 anti-poaching watchers (APWs) led by a forest ranger at the Anaikundhi area to monitor the tusker.

Initially the department planned to keep the animal in a krawl (a wooden enclosure where captured wild elephants are confined for training) in the Varagaliyar elephant camp. However, after discussions the forest department officials in Chennai discussed with the forest department minister Dindigul C Srinivasan and changed their decisions. They decided to release the animal into the reserve forest side.

The captured male elephant was transported to Varagaliyar elephant camp from Vellalapalayam near Vellalore in Coimbatore and later the elephant was taken five km away in a truck where it was released at around 11.30 pm on Friday.

In June 22, 2016, a wild elephant from Madukkarai was captured and was kept inside the krawl at Varagaliyar where the elephant died after hitting its head in the wooden krawl. Forest department sources said that after the death of Madukkarai Maharaj, the officials decided to release the captured elephant into the reserve forest.

V Ganeshan, Field Director of Anaimalai Tiger Reserve (ATR) told media persons that the department used to provide training to the captured elephant which is below 10 years old. But the captured elephant aged about more than 16-20 year-old and it would very difficult to train the animal. It would not obey the instructions given by mahouts.

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Elephant creates panic in Kovaipudur

Tension prevailed in some of the residential areas near Kovaipudur when an elephant strayed into the locality late on Sunday.

The movement of the elephant was captured in a surveillance camera of a house at 9.10 p.m. Most of the residents knew the presence of the elephant in the locality very late as they were glued to television watching the India-Pakistan cricket match. The elephant damaged the gate of a house and a few trees. Forest staff who reached the spot burst crackers to scare the elephant back into the forest around 1.30 a.m. on Monday.

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Elephant raids residential area in Coimbatore city

COIMBATORE: Forest department officials, with the help of local residents struggled for hours to scare away a wild elephant, that turned up at the Press Enclave in Kovaipudur in the wee hours of Monday. The tusker damaged compound walls of some houses and destroyed several trees, department sources said.

Panicked residents had contacted the department officials after finding the lone elephant at the colony around 12am. "We requested Kuniyamuthur police officers to warn the public not to come out of their residences for early morning walk. The residents co-operated with us," said M Senthilkumar, ranger, Madukkarai forest range anti-poaching watchers (APWs). "We deployed two teams of APWs to chase away the tusker. It did not attack anyone and was searching for food in the residential area," he said.

After seven hours of struggle, APW teams managed to send back the elephant to the reserve forest.

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2 policemen among 5 who got injured in elephant attacks

Coimbatore: Five men, including two policemen engaged in combing operation to curtail the movement of Maoists in the Tamil Nadu-Kerala border, had a narrow escape after wild elephants attacked them at various places on Wednesday night.

In the first incident, a tusker attacked two anti-poaching watchers from Madukkarai, who were trying to chase it away from BK Pudur, a residential area. An anti-poaching watcher, who was injured in the attack, is undergoing treatment at a private hospital.

The tusker, in its 20s, had come out of the reserve forest in Madukkarai forest range on Wednesday night, forest department officials said. “The elephant crossed the busy Palakkad-Coimbatore road near BK Pudur and entered a residential area. Anti-poaching watcher M Karthikeyan from Madukkarai, who tried to chase it away, was attacked by the elephant, which pierced his lungs with its tusks. It then targeted Karthikeyan’s colleague R Vijayakumar, also from Madukkarai. Forest department staff managed to rescue the duo and rushed them to a hospital.

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Elephant corridor in Hassan gets a push

BENGALURU: The state government has decided to restore an elephant corridor cutting through Sakaleshpur and Alur taluks in Hassan district, in a project expected to cost more than Rs 230 crore. The corridor, which has become fragmented over the years, has emerged as a human-elephant conflict zone.

The project, known as Elephant Reserve or Park, has been in the pipeline for long.TOI has learned that forest minister B Ramanath Rai has now directed department officials to explore funding options for the project as it involves land acquisition in a few villages in the two taluks. A team from the Union forests ministry is expected to visit the proposed corridor area soon.

“The forest department is set to develop an elephant corridor spread over 22,000 hectares, including parcels of government land and private land close to a village called Hettur in Sakaleshpur taluk,” said Anur Reddy P, chief conservator of forests (wildlife).

Elephants in this part of the state, he said, were struggling to find forest space due to fragmentation of their habitat and therefore, frequently ended up in conflict situations with people.

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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Forest officials step up efforts to capture tusker

With an elephant having trampled four persons to death less than a week ago on the citys outskirts, Forest department officials are taking efforts to capture a tusker said to be moving around in human habitations at Madukkarai near here in the last two days.

The pachyderm, which appeared to be sick was spotted at Press Enclave in Kovaipudur two days ago and damaged the gate of a house and fencing and brought down branches of a mango tree, Forest officials said.

Even as the Forest department and police officials reached the spot, the elephant had made its way to another area, where it damaged some trees and pulled down a thatched shed. The animal left the place after residents burst crackers to scare it away.

Residents of Theethipalayam and Thondamuthur today complained to Forest department officials that the elephant was entering their farms and destroying crops, police said.

The department has formed a team, including anti-poaching watchers, to monitor the elephants movements and capture it.

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Three jumbos electrocuted in Dhenkanal forest division

BHUBANESWAR: Three female elephants, including a six-month-old calf, were electrocuted at Borapada forest in Dhenkanal forest division on Saturday morning. Their carcasses were found about 12km from Dhenkanal town.

Forest officials said the two other dead elephants include a six-year old sub-adult and a 22-year old adult one. The pachyderms reportedly came in contact with a hanging electric cable near a defunct iron grill- making unit resulting in their instant death.

This is the second incident of electrocution in three days.

"Two days ago, an elephant was electrocuted at Betonati range in Baripada forest division. The carcasses were found very close to hanging cables. There were clear signs of the elephant dying of electrocution. We had intimated the power department asking them to fix the sagging wires," said Sudarshan Panda, the regional chief conservator of forests (Angul). The carcasses will be buried after their visceral samples are taken by a veterinary doctor, he added.

It must be noted that Dhenkanal boasts of 164 resident elephants, the second highest among the 50 forest divisions in the state. Mayurbhanj district has the highest number of resident elephants.
But 41 elephants have died in different forest divisions of the state in the past six months, said officials of the forest department.

"The three dead elephants belonged to a herd of 32 jumbos in the district. They were seen frequenting the area for fodder over the past one month," said a senior wildlife officer.

Biswajit Mohanty, the secretary of the Wildlife Society of Odisha (WSO), said, "The electric wire was only four feet from the ground. It is a dangerous trend. Human lives could have been lost" said Mohanty.

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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Elephant deaths: Two forest officials placed under suspension

Two officials of the Forest department were placed under suspension on charge of dereliction in duty leading to death of three elephants due to electrocution at Borapada forest in Dhenkanal Forest Division.

Dhenkanal Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) Rinku Kumar issued order of suspension of forester Punyabikash Bhoi and forest guard Srikant Guru.

"As per the post mortem report, the elephants had died 24 hours earlier. The forester and forest guard were suspended as they took 24 hours for detection of the deaths," the DFO said.

This apart, the DFO said show cause notices have also been issued to the Dhenkanal Sadar forest ranger Bibhuti Bhusan Patnaik and Central Electricity Supply Utility (CESU).

Meanwhile, the Forest department has also registered a case under sections of Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 against a private company engaged by CESU to provide electricity-related services to consumers in Dhenkanal and Angul districts.

Some officials of the private company have also been named in the FIR, the DFO added. PTI COR AAM RG

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Jacqueline happy with the rescue of an old elephant

Actress Jacqueline Fernandez is known to be an Animal lover. The actress is extremely sensitive towards animals, and is often seen being vocal of her thoughts on various topics pertaining to them.

The actress took to Twitter to express her gratitude to Sudhir Mungantiwar, from the Forest ministry and Peta India for having taken measures to ensure the well meaning of the wild animal.

Gajraj is a 63 years old elephant who was held in chains for tourist attraction at a temple in Satara, India, was rescued by officials.

The animal was held in captivity for 50 years is dying in agony and has had its tusks chopped off.

The captivity resulted in painful abscesses on his hind quarters and elbows with mental distress caused by social isolation and continuous abuse in captivity.

On hearing about the plight of the old elephant, Jacqueline Fernandez was deeply moved. The news of Gajraj came as a sigh of relief for the actress, who took to Twitter to express her happiness.

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Elephant tramples man to death in Tamil Nadu

An elephant has trampled a 50-year-old man to death in Burgur hill area, police said on Tuesday.

The man had gone out for a function and was stated to be missing since Sunday morning.

Police said his relatives found his body near Guddiyur village on Monday evening with signs of him being trampled to death by an elephant.

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Elephant ransacks security camp

AGARTALA: A civil village defence volunteer was injured and a security camp destroyed in a violent attack by a wild elephant in north Maharanipur village under the Kalyanpur police station under Khowai district in West Tripura.

The attack, which took place on Sunday night, was the third such attack in Kalyanpur in the last 10 days.

According to reports, two volunteers of a 13-member team were on sentry duty at the civil village defence camp at midnight when an elephant attacked the camp. When they tried to run away, one of them - Nibas Sarkar - was hit by the elephant and rolled down to a ditch. He managed to escape along with the others.

The angry elephant went on a rampage for about an hour and completely destroyed the camp.
Wildlife officials went to the spot later but could not locate the elephant. They did, however, say that the Kalyanpur area has now become a corridor of wild elephants living in the Athuramura hill range that is connected to the eastern fringe of the Chittagong Hills Tract of Bangladesh. In recent years, after the end of insurgecy in the state, human activity in the hill range has increased exponentially - affecting the food-chain and movement of elephants.

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Sunday, June 25, 2017

Elephant `Gajraj' rescued

Mumbai: `Gajraj', a 63-year old elephant, has been rescued after living in chains at Aundh in Satara district of Maharashtra for more than 50 years, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) said in Mumbai on Wednesday.

He has been sent to Elephant Conservation and Care Centre (ECCC) at Mathura in Uttar Pradesh, it said.

PETA had launched a campaign for rescue of Gajraj, who was kept chained near a popular temple in Aundh.

In April, Maharashtra government appointed veterinarians confirmed that the elephant was suffering from untreated abscesses on his hindquarters and elbows, as well as a painful foot condition, PETA said.

According to PETA's director of veterinary affairs Dr Manilal Valliyate, Gajraj is thought to be captured from the wild in 1965, and then forced to make an 800-kilometre journey from Ujjain in Madhya Pradesh to Satara.

Several celebrities, including Jacqueline Fernandez, Suniel Shetty, Sunny Leone, Sidharth Malhotra and Sonakshi Sinha had supported PETA's campaign for the animal's rescue.

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Wildlife Trust to purchase 38 acres for jumbo corridor

MYSURU: As part of its long-term goal to secure elephant corridors across India and check man-animal conflicts, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), along with the Karnataka Forest Department, has planned to purchase 38 acres on the fringes of Chamarajanagar-Talamalai forest at Mudahalli to widen the elephant corridor.

With the proposed land acquisition, the corridor will be widened by 200-300 metres along along 1.5 km to facilitate free movement of elephants. The plan has a potential to provide unhindered habitat connectivity for more than 2,000 elephants directly.

The authorities have studied the link for wild animals’ movement between Biligiri Ranganathaswamy Tiger Reserve and Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve.

The move will benefit around 2,000 elephants. The Forest Department felt the widening of the elephant corridor not only provides free passage to elephants but also bails out around 5 lakh families affected by man-animal conflict. Keen on protecting wildlife habitats, the WTI had, in 2005, identified 88 elephant corridors across India’s elephant range states, working in collaboration with a team of experienced researchers, forest officials and NGOs.

Though five corridors like Edayarhalli-Doddasampige (Karnataka), Siju-Rewak (Meghalaya), Rewak-Emangre (Meghalaya), Thirunelli-Kudrakote (Kerala) and Chilla-Motichur (Uttarakhand) have already been secured with the support of stakeholders, the WTI that purchased 25.5 acres in Doddasampige in 2003 had transferred the land in 2009.

The WTI has plans to involve schools and community organisations in conducting awareness programmes to educate villagers about the need of corridors. It will also educate the local communities towards minimising their dependency on forests.

“The Mudahalli Corridor, with its small but vital piece of land, is all the elephants have to pass between two key tiger reserves— BRT and Sathyamangalam,” said Sandeep Tiwari of the IUCN-Asian Elephant Specialist Group, India.

“The other corridor between these protected areas, Punjur, is almost completely blocked leaving Mudahalli as the critical connection with the movement already restricted for both
elephants and tigers,” he added.

He said the efforts of WTI and the Karnataka Forest Department to secure and widen the corridor needs urgent support.

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Friday, June 23, 2017

Elephant Calf Found Dead

BERHAMPUR: An elephant calf was found dead near Karada forest in Kandhamal district on Thursday. The postmortem of the calf, aged less than a year, was done, a day after its death on Friday, as four elephants, including the mother, did not allow the forest officials to go to the spot.

“We waited the whole day but could not venture near the spot as the herd guarded the carcass,” said divisional forest officer (Phulbani) Prakash Chand Gogineni. Efforts of the forest staff to drive away the elephants from the spot also failed.

A group of tribals had informed the forest officials about the carcass. He said the exact cause of death could not be ascertained. There was no visible injury mark on the carcass.

“The reason of the death would be known only after we get the postmortem report,” said the DFO.

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