Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Farmer trampled by elephants

Fear gripped the hamlets abutting the Koundinya elephant sanctuary in Palamaner and Baireddipalle mandals on Thursday, when the body of a farmer who went missing a few days ago was found in the forests in a highly decomposed state, after he was reportedly trampled by elephants.

Palamaner Circle Inspector A. Surendra Reddy said Muneendra, 32, of Chettapenta village of Palamaner mandal, went inside the sanctuary along with cows four days ago. As he didn't return home, his family members and neighbours searched for him but in vain. Some cattlemen noticed the body on Thursday and informed Palamaner police after identifying him.

The officials suspect that as the badly mauled body was found in the forests of adjoining Baireddipalle mandal, the deceased might have run for life from the a wild herd.

Marks of trampling and the footprints and dung of elephants were noticed in the vicinity.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/andhra-pradesh/farmer-trampled-by-elephants/article19730585.ece

Friday, October 06, 2017

Injured elephant calf at ICU of CWRC

An elephant calf, which suddenly fell down into a narrow drain at Mikirjan in a tea garden at Behora near Kaziranga National Park and rescued by its own mother, is now under the treatment of Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) under Wildlife Trust of India at Borjuri here. According to Dr Samsul Haque, attending veterinarian, even though the elephant calf was initially rescued by the mother elephant, but later in the evening it again fell down, only to be rescued by local people.

By that time, the calf visibly became very weak and the CWRC was accordingly informed about it.

The calf was then immediately brought to the CWRC and put under ICU treatment, said Dr Haque. But now the calf is showing a sign of slight improvement although it is not out of danger.

While talking about the problems being faced by elephant calves in tea gardens because of the existence of drainage system at the very corridors of wild animals, Dr Navin Pandey from Corbett Foundation felt that there is a need for meaningful talks between the officials of tea gardens and Forest Department to find out a solution to minimise the tragedy. Dr Pandey added that often the calves suffered more in many of the cases and, in some cases, the nature of the injuries remained fatal. He said that already the elephant corridors in the nation remained very fragmented, therefore the Government must initiate steps to keep the existing elephant corridors intact even if these corridors were inside the tea estates.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://assambulletin.com/assam/injured-elephant-calf-at-icu-of-cwrc-923595

Herd of elephants stray into Doon residential area

A family of three elephants strayed into the Ladpur residential area of the city early today, triggering fear among locals, officials and residents said. The elephants, however, did not hurt any passersby and fled into the surrounding forests after forest department officials fired in the air and set off firecrackers to scare them away, Dehradun District Forest Officer Prasanna Kumar Patro said.

"The elephants are still in the forests near the city and we are trying to chase them away to Rajaji National Park", he said.

The herd comprised a family of three elephants including a male, a female elephant and their calf, Patro said, adding the family was recently spotted roaming around in the Nakraunda area.

With construction work on the Dehradun-Haridwar National Highway picking up momentum, the elephants seem to have lost their way to Rajaji National Park and strayed into residential areas, Patro said.

Witnesses said the elephants had initially strayed into the Badrish colony adjacent to Dalanwala.

"We woke up to the sounds of firecrackers and gunshots this morning. As we looked out we saw three elephants running into the forests," Badrish colony resident Rajesh Painuli said.

It is the first time that elephants entered so deep into the city.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://m.eenaduindia.com/states/north/uttarakhand/2017/09/18142516/Herd-of-elephants-stray-into-Doon-residential-area.vpf

Thursday, October 05, 2017

Elephant herd strays into Dehradun, triggers panic

A family of three elephants strayed into the Ladpur residential area of the city early today, triggering fear among locals, officials and residents said.

The elephants, however, did not hurt any passersby and fled into the surrounding forests after forest department officials fired in the air and set off firecrackers to scare them away, Dehradun District Forest Officer Prasanna Kumar Patro said.

"The elephants are still in the forests near the city and we are trying to chase them away to Rajaji National Park", he said.

The herd comprised a family of three elephants including a male, a female elephant and their calf, Patro said, adding the family was recently spotted roaming around in the Nakraunda area.

With construction work on the Dehradun-Haridwar National Highway picking up momentum,
the elephants seem to have lost their way to Rajaji National Park and strayed into residential areas, Patro said. Witnesses said the elephants had initially strayed into the Badrish colony adjacent to Dalanwala.

"We woke up to the sounds of firecrackers and gunshots this morning. As we looked out we saw three elephants running into the forests," Badrish colony resident Rajesh Painuli said. It is the first time that elephants entered so deep into the city.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/elephant-herd-strays-into-dehradun-triggers-panic/1/1050460.html

4 injured, one critical, after elephant attack

Four people have been injured in elephant attacks near BHEL, Ranipur, in Haridwar Forest Division (HFD) in just two days.

Ashvini Kumar and Hari Singh were attacked by the pachyderm when they went to relieve themselves near a dried-up river that passes through the forest division on Monday. While Hari managed to flee, Ashvini sustained serious injuries on his ribs and jaw and was admitted to Himalayan Hospital at Jolly Grant where his condition is said to be critical. Both are residents of Labour Colony near the BHEL township.

On Tuesday, two more residents of the colony had a narrow escape when they were attacked by an elephant. Sunil Kumar and Chhote Lal sustained minor injuries while running from the elephant.
According to range officer, Dinesh Nautiyal, “The doctor’s report will shed light on the nature of the attack. There is a possibility that the elephant injured Ashvini with its trunk.” Nautiyal said that a team of forest guards was patrolling the area.

The officer added that the compensation would be decided based on the doctor’s report. A person injured critically by a wild animal inside the forest receives Rs 50,000 while a victim with light injuries gets Rs 15,000.

To read the full article, click on the story title

No elephant ride at Amber during Navratri festival

Elephant rides will remain suspended at Amber Fort during the upcoming festival of Navratri.

The rides at the massive courtyard of Jaleb Chowk and the popular Shila Mata Temple have been halted from today till the end of the month.

However, the light and sound show in English at 8.30 pm will go as usual during the auspicious Navratri festival.

Also, on the World Tourism Day (September 27) the entry to Amber Palace will be free for all.

The rides will resume from October 1 and continue till March 2018, a government release said.

Elephant ride at Amber, is one of the highlights of a visit to the stunning Amer Fort. Elephants will be decorated with traditional painted patterns and effortlessly transport visitors up the steep slope to the fort.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.oneindia.com/india/no-elephant-ride-at-amber-during-navratri-festival-2547381.html

Elephant injured in landmine blast dies

The 20-year-old elephant was injured when a landmine planted under the ground went when the animal's front right leg fell on top of it two days ago near village Latu under Palamau Tiger Reserve buffer area.

The leg was severely damaged in the explosion and the elephant succumbed on Wednesday night, Palamau Tiger Reserve director M P Singh said. The forest department tried its best to provide adequate treatment to the injured pachyderm but in vain, he said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://m.eenaduindia.com/states/east/jharkhand/2017/09/22073120/Elephant-injured-in-landmine-blast-dies.vpf

Farmer trampled by elephants

Fear gripped the hamlets abutting the Koundinya elephant sanctuary in Palamaner and Baireddipalle mandals on Thursday, when the body of a farmer who went missing a few days ago was found in the forests in a highly decomposed state, after he was reportedly trampled by elephants.

Palamaner Circle Inspector A. Surendra Reddy said Muneendra, 32, of Chettapenta village of Palamaner mandal, went inside the sanctuary along with cows four days ago. As he didn't return home, his family members and neighbours searched for him but in vain. Some cattlemen noticed the body on Thursday and informed Palamaner police after identifying him.

The officials suspect that as the badly mauled body was found in the forests of adjoining Baireddipalle mandal, the deceased might have run for life from the a wild herd.

Marks of trampling and the footprints and dung of elephants were noticed in the vicinity.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/andhra-pradesh/farmer-trampled-by-elephants/article19730585.ece?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=RSS_Syndication

Wednesday, October 04, 2017

Wildlife product seizures go up 90 per cent

The seizures of wildlife products by the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) have gone up by 90 per cent till August in comparison to the seizures in 2014.

The SSB has seized products worth Rs 187.89 crore this year against Rs 2.21 crore three years ago. The SSB is tasked with guarding India’s borders with Nepal and Bhutan.

These products were seized from 93 smugglers against those caught in 2014. A major reason behind the SSB’s success in its drive against wildlife crimes was a constant watch on the smuggling of endangered species like Tokey Gecko Lizards and prohibited items like snake venom, bones and skin of tigers and leopards, elephant tusks/ivory, rhino horn and deer skin and deer meat, etc.

In the recent past, the SSB apprehended snake venom worth Rs 100 crore in West Bengal, which happens to the be the most wildlife-crime prone state with 125 cases followed by UP with 54 cases. Sources said Alipurduar in West Bengal is the main hub of the wildlife smuggling from where 98 cases had been reported followed by Bahraich (15 cases) and Balrampur (15) in UP, Udalguri (14) in Assam, Jailpaiguri (12) and Darjeeling (10) in West Bengal. The illegal trade also includes the body parts of dead animals like rhino horns, leopard skin and paw, deer horn and skull and elephant trunk.

The data assessed by this newspaper suggests that the price of the seized products has shown a massive increase to the tune of Rs 11.16 crore and Rs 46.62 crore with the arrest of 43 and 70 smugglers in 2015 and 2016, respectively. In 2017, the SSB team seized wild life products worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers in 82 cases.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Sunday, October 01, 2017

Sashastra Seema Bal now a nemesis for wildlife smugglers

The Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) has had a good run in nabbing the smugglers involved in carrying out wildlife crime. This year, SSB has seized things worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers. These smugglers were involved in smuggling endangered species like Tokey Gecko lizards and prohibited items like snake venom, tiger and leopard skins and bones, elephant tusks/ivory, rhino horn, snake sand boa, tortoise, turtle and deer, deer skin and deer meat.

Recently, the SSB apprehended snake venom worth Rs 100 crore in West Bengal, which happens to the be the most wildlife-crime prone state with 125 cases followed by Uttar Pradesh with 54 cases.

Sources said Alipurduar in West Bengal is the main hub of wildlife smuggling from where 98 cases had been reported followed by Bahraich (15 cases) and Balrampur (15cases) in UP, Udalguri (14cases) in Assam, Jailpaiguri (12) and Darjeeling (10) in West Bengal.

Other areas of wildlife smuggling are Lakhimpur Kheri in UP and Kishanganj and West Champaran in Bihar. The illegal trade also includes body parts of dead animals like rhino horns, leopard skin and paw, deer horn and skull, rein deer skin, barking deer skin and elephant trunk.

The data shows that the price of seized products showed a massive increase to Rs11.16 crore and Rs 46.62 crore with the arrest of 43 and 70 smugglers in 2015 and 2016 respectively. In 2017, the SSB team has seized wild life products worth Rs 187.69 crore from 93 smugglers in 82 cases.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Elephants and tigers kill 3 humans every month in Karnataka

As many as 146 people have been killed by wild elephants and tigers in the past four years in Karnataka, which translates into three deaths per month. The figure raises concerns over the increasing incidence of man-animal conflict.

According to data from the Union ministry of environment, forest and climate change, the number is less in comparison to states like West Bengal and Assam — which witnessed 367 and 241 human deaths respectively in the same period — but experts say the fact that deaths are increasing every year in Karnataka is a cause for worry. Karnataka boasts of the highest number of tigers and elephants in the country.

Data accessed by TOI from the Union ministry and the state forest department shows elephants are more in conflict with human than tigers — 135 of the 146 deaths were caused by jumbos and only 11 by tigers.

"Every year, at least 36 people are being killed by elephants and tigers in Karnataka. Though the number marginally dipped in 2015-16, the last financial year saw it go up to 38," said a senior official from the state forest department.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Man trampled to death by elephant in Coimbatore district

A 25-year-old man was trampled to death by an elephant near Mullangadu check post on the city outskirts, police said today.

The incident occurred last night when the victim Manishkumar, from Rajasthan, was walking along the road, browsing his cell phone and failed to notice the elephant that suddenly appeared before him, they said.

The pachyderm immediately attacked Manish, an engineer, resulting in his death, they added.
On receiving information, police and forest officials rushed to the spot and recovered the body, police said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.india.com/news/agencies/man-trampled-to-death-by-elephant-in-coimbatore-district-2461660/

Elephant drowns in Panna tiger reserve

A female elephant has drowned in Ken river in Panna National Park, leaving behind a mammoth puzzle for the park management because elephants are known to be strong, untiring swimmers.

Named Vindhya, the elephant was born in Panna Tiger Reserve in 2002. Its carcass was seen floating in Ken river on Saturday. It was brought to the shore, and foresters began one of their most interesting investigations ever.

"Prima facie, the cause of death appears to be drowning. After the carcass was fished out, an autopsy was conducted on the spot. We are awaiting the final report to ascertain exact cause of the death," director of Panna National Park, Vivek Jain, said.

Vindhya was one of three elephants used for patrolling the jungle. All three were kept at Peepertola, a jungle camp inside the park. They were fed and were freed to move around on September 9, Jain said. Around 3pm, two elephants were seen near the river but Vindhya was missing. Later in the evening, its carcass was found in the river.

The drowning is very mysterious because elephants are said to be good in water. Their big body provides flotation while the trunk acts like a snorkel. By moving all four legs like paddles, they swim quite fast. In July this year, an elephant was rescued by Sri Lankan Navy 15km into the deep ocean.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bhopal/elephant-drowns-in-panna-tiger-reserve/articleshow/60469780.cms



Monday, September 25, 2017

ROGUE WILD ELEPHANT DISRUPTS FUNERAL, STOMPS MAN TO DEATH

A 65-year-old man was trampled to death by a rogue female elephant while performing the last rites of his cousin at a burial ground located at Karumalai tea estate in Valparai here on Saturday evening.

The deceased was identified as S Velusamy, a retired tea estate employee. His cousin Rajendran, 67, of the same locality, had died of some ailment on Friday evening. Velusamy, along with other kin and neighbours of the deceased, took the body to a burial ground located at Karumalai estate in a tractor on Saturday evening. While they were performing last rites, a wild elephant charged towards them and the people ran for their life, abandoning the body at the burial ground.

Velusamy was, however, not able to run and the elephant trampled him to death. When alerted, forest officials reached the spot but the grieving relatives of Velusamy didn’t allow them to take the body to the Valparai government hospital for postmortem. They also staged a protest, urging the forest department to protect them from wild elephant attacks and also to chase the rogue elephant away into the reserve forest area.

Valparai police also reached the spot and held talks with the kin of the elephant attack victim. The kin finally agreed to take the body to the government hospital and the body was handed over to them on Sunday after the postmortem.

The forest department, meanwhile, brought kumki Kaleem from Topslip elephant camp to Valparai to chase the rogue elephant away into the reserve forest area from the tea estate. “We have deployed additional forest department field staff at the Karumalai tea estate to protect the labourers residing in the quarters. We have already initiated steps to chase away the elephant to the reserve forest and are likely to bring another kumki from Topslip elephant camp to assist us in the mission,” said V Subbaiah, district forest officer, Pollachi forest division.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.newstread.com/regional-news/india/coimbatore/rogue-wild-elephant-disrupts-funeral-stomps-man-to-death/



Sunday, September 24, 2017

Woman, her minor son killed in elephant attack

A 35-year-old woman and her minor son were killed and houses were damaged by a herd of wild elephants in a village of Chhattisgarh?s Surguja district, police said today.

The incident took place last night in Pidiya village under Sitapur police station area, Station House Officer (SHO) Sitapur Dinesh Singh Baghel said.

A herd of wild elephants entered the village, which lies in the Mainpat forest range. A woman, Ratni Bai, and her son Sukhsai (5) were trampled to death by the elephants after they came in front of the herd, he said.

The pachyderms also damaged at least 20 houses in the village and killed a livestock before going back inside the forest, the SHO added.

The kin of the deceased have been given an instant relief amount of Rs 50,000, a local forest official said.

The thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, comprising Surguja, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur and Korea districts, are known for human-elephant conflict.

The region has witnessed several killings of tribals and widespread damages to houses and crops by rogue elephant in the past

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/woman-her-minor-son-killed-in-elephant-attack/1/1036650.html

Wild elephant collapses, dies

A female elephant, which reportedly went on the rampage at Valparai, today collapsed and died, while being chased away by tamed elephants (Kumki), police said.

The wild elephant's intrusion in the estate area triggered panic over the last few days and a 62-year-old man was found trampled to death on Saturday last.

Following an agitation by the villagers, the forest department deployed two 'kumkis' to either capture or chase the elephant into the jungle.

Amid operations, the wild elephant suddenly collapsed while being chased and died, police said.

The forest officials were contemplating to tranquilise and catch it.

Investigations are on to find the reason for the death, they said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/wild-elephant-collapses-dies/1134576

Injured elephant given treatment

A 40-year-old female elephant, ailing from injuries to its vulva and face, was treated for its injuries by the forest department staff in the Sigur River in the Singara Range of the Nilgiris North Division on Thursday.

Forest department officials said that the animal was found wandering in the Sigur River since Thursday and that treatment had been given for the last two days. Forest veterinarian E. Vijayaraghavan said that the animal had injuries to its face, eyes and vaginal regions, and maggots had also infested the injured animal.

Acting quickly, the forest department used darts to treat the animal with painkillers and antibiotics. “The animal is standing on its legs, but is refusing to take food. It is also cooperating with our efforts to treat it, so we have also given energy shots,” said Mr. Vijayaraghavan.

Forest department officials in the Nilgiris North Division said that a call would be taken whether to continue treatment to the animal on Friday.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Coimbatore/injured-elephant-given-treatment/article19595957.ece

Wild elephants trample two tribal women to death

Two tribal women were on Thursday trampled to death by wild elephants in Chhattisgarh's Raigarh district, police said. The incident took place at around 1:30 am when a herd of elephants entered in Gerupani village under Kapu forest range, a local police official said.

The victims Budhwaro Bai (50) and Bindi Bai (52) were sleeping in their huts when they were attacked by the pachyderms leaving them dead on the spot, he said, adding other family members managed to escape and saved themselves.

The kin of the deceased have been given an initial relief amount of Rs 25,000 each, the official said adding the remaining compensation will be disbursed soon after completing the necessary process.

The villagers have been advised to take precautions and stay alerted after the movement of pachyderms reported in the area, he added.

The thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, comprising Surguja, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur and Korea districts, are notorious for human elephant conflict incidents.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://m.eenaduindia.com/states/east/chhattisgarh/2017/08/31213748/Chhattisgarh-Wild-elephants-trample-two-tribal-women.vpf

Woman Maoist trampled to death by wild elephant in Malappuram

There are reports that a woman Maoist was trampled to death by a wild elephant in Malappuram. A notice brought out by the CPI (Maoist) Western Ghats special regional committee states that a native of Malampuzha, Kattekad of Palakkad Latha was trampled to death by a wild elephant.
Latha, who works for the Bhavani group of Maoist's Western Ghats committee, has been in hiding for the past 15 years.

The incident seems to have took place on August 6, when a wild elephant attacked Latha in the Naadukani jungle of Malappuram. The organisation has expressed their regret at cremating the body without showing it to her relatives or other Maoist activists. The notice also says that the body has been cremated within the jungle.

Meanwhile, the police have started an investigation on the Maoist notice.
Reports say that neither the police nor the forest guards were aware of such an accident and death.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://m.dailyhunt.in/news/india/english/kaumudiglobal-epaper-kglobal/woman+maoist+trampled+to+death+by+wild+elephant+in+malappuram-newsid-72630143

Two elephants found dead in Kumaon

Two elephants were found dead by patrolling teams in Terai-Central division and Haldwani divisions. The cause of the death of the pachyderms is yet to be determined. While a female elephant was found dead in Terai-Central division, a male pachyderm was found dead in Haldwani forest division. No signs of struggle with another animal were found.

“We are investigating the deaths of the animals. Post-mortem is underway to determine the cause of death,” said Parag Madhukar Dhakate, conservator of forests, Western Circle, Kumaon.

Last month, in the countrywide census of elephants, Uttarakhand ranked sixth with a population of 1,839 elephants. In Uttarakhand, elephants are found in Rajaji Tiger Reserve, Corbett Tiger Reserve, Western Circle and Lansdowne forest division.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/dehradun/two-elephants-found-dead-in-kumaon/articleshow/60329244.cms

Friday, September 22, 2017

12 jumbos from K’taka to patrol UP’s tiger reserves

Pilibhit: The Uttar Pradesh government is set to procure 12 elephants from Karnataka which will be deployed in Pilibhit Tiger Reserve (PTR), Dudhva Tiger Reserve (DTR) and the Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary (KWLS) to keep a tight vigil on the movement of poachers.

Confirming the development, SK Upadhyay, UP principal chief conservator of forest (wildlife), said: “The central government has approved the plan and a high-level team of senior forest officials, wildlife experts and veterinarians will now be visiting Karnataka soon to give the final shape to the plan.”

“Of the 12 elephants, four will be given to PTR and the remaining eight will go to DTR. We have made the preliminary identification of elephants matching to our needs. The elephants will now go through a medical test,” said Upadhyay.

“After they are brought from Karnataka, the elephants will be kept separately for at least four-six months to make them adapt local environmental and geographical conditions. The elephants will also be tested for effects of local conditions on them during their period. The quarantine will be developed in surroundings of DTR in Kheri district.”

The prime function of these elephants would be field patrolling; besides, they would also play a crucial role in combing agricultural fields for tigers, he said.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Centre seeks State plans on jumbo corridors

The Ministry of Environment and Forests has asked the Forest Department to furnish measures being undertaken to secure three elephant corridors in the State as per the direction of the Supreme Court.Earlier this month, hearing on a writ petition by Vidya Athreya, the apex court had asked the Centre to consider measures to make 27 elephant corridors inviolate since these were accorded high priority status in ‘Gajah’ report submitted by the Project Elephant in 2013.

These 27 elephant corridors are located in nine States. The three corridors in Odisha include the Similipal-Satkosia, Baula-Kuldiha and Kotagarh-Chandrapur routes used by the elephants.
Sources in the Wildlife Wing said the MoEF has sought to know if land acquisition would be required to secure the three corridors.In a letter to the State, IG (Forests) and Director, Project Elephant RK Srivastava asked to assess the feasibility of protecting the corridors through land acquisition and stated that MoEF would consider funding assistance for the purpose.

The State Government has been asked to furnish the action taken report within 60 days. Accordingly, the Wildlife Wing has asked the DFOs of Keonjhar, Balasore, Baripada, Rayagada and Baliguda to submit details of the corridors.Sources said, the DFOs would have to indicate the land pattern of the corridors and if there is existence of private land which may necessitate acquisition in various forms to make the corridors secure.

However, of the three corridors, the Similipal-Satkosia and Baula-Kuldiha stretches are part of one composite route used by the elephants as identified by the Wildlife Wing, while the Kotagarh-Chandrapur is a separate one.The State Government has, so far, identified 14 elephant corridors in the State. In 2012-13, it started the Elephant Corridor Management Plan with an annual budget of `5 crore. In 2015, a separate Elephant Management Plan was launched. To converge the initiatives, it clubbed the two schemes under Management of Elephant and Corridors beginning 2016-17.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Outfit wants to prevent ‘illegal donation’ of jumbo

Noted animal rights campaigner Heritage Animal Task Force has come out against the proposed offering of an elephant at a Kerala temple alleging that it is the violation of a Supreme Court order.
The state-based outfit sent a letter to the Inspector General and Director, ‘Project Elephant’ under Ministry of Environment and Forests seeking its immediate intervention to check the alleged ‘unlawful’ offering.

The campaigner also attached the copy of a related apex court order along with the letter.
According to the letter, the advisory committee of Asramam Sree Krishna Temple in Kollam District is organising a function at the temple premises which would witness an offering of a captive elephant by a person on September 12.

Prayar Goapalakrishnan, the president of Travancore Devaswom Board (TDB) which manages the temple, would receive the jumbo on behalf of the temple during the proposed function.
The outfit alleged that as per the Supreme Court Order, the state Government has lost the legal status to issue new ownership certificate on behalf of any elephant in favour of any person or trust or temple or any other place of worship.

Moreover, the state government had issued an order stating that everybody must adhere to various conditions to donate an elephant to any legal entity or an individual, it said.

“All these conditions have not been satisfied by the donor in this present case of illegal donation of elephant,” V K Venkitachalam, Secretary, Heritage Animal Task Force, said in the letter.
He also alleged that Travancore Devaswom Board, which manages hundreds of temples in the state, has 29 elephants in its custody “without” having any statutory ownership certificate.

Moreover, these 29 elephants suffer from “various diseases” mainly due to the inconvenience at 29 temples at which they are now kept in violation of elephant preservation rules in the state, he said.
The campaigner also wanted the state Forest Minister K Raju to keep away from the proposed function.

“It is high time for the state Government to initiate legal action to prevent this type of illegal transfer of custody of an elephant to a temple, owned by the TDB,” he said.

The Devaswom Board could not use its financial resources to maintain an elephant which is admitted to a temple through this type of “illegal donation’, he pointed out in the letter.

He wanted the Project Elephant authorities to initiate “urgent concrete actions” to prevent the donation.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.india.com/news/agencies/outfit-wants-to-prevent-illegal-donation-of-jumbo-2460144/

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Amber Fort cancels elephant rides

The famed Amber fort has started making preparations for the nine-day Navratri festival starting later this month. The world famous monument, which also houses the Shila Mata temple will also halt elephant rides for the period.

Night tourism activities will also not be conducted. The light-and-sound show will have only one performance at 8:30 pm.

These activities are typically at the top of to-do lists for tourists visiting Jaipur. Since the tourism season in the state starts in September itself, even weekdays see lots of footfalls.

Pankaj Dharendra, Suprintendent of Amber fort, said elephant rides will not be available starting September 20 through September 30. Starting October through March, 2018, 5-6 rounds daily for each elephant will be permitted.

While the morning session will be from 7:30 am to 11:30 am, the evening rides will be conducted from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm .

On the occasion of World Tourism Day, entry to Amber Fort will be free on September 27.

A meeting related to reviewing the arrangements at the fort during the Navratri festival was conducted recently. Notably, due to the Shila Mata temple which sees a lot of devotees the nine days of Navratri, additional security arrangements have been made.

TIME CHANGED
The elephant rides will not be available from September 20 to September 30.
Starting October through March 2018, only 5-6 rounds will be permitted.
The morning rides will commence from 7:30 am to 11:30 am and evening rides will be conducted from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-amber-fort-cancels-elephant-rides-2546004

Elephant Herd Kills 2 Women In Tikrikilla

Two women, Pongsai Rabha (65) and Hobisori Rabha (30), were trampled to death in Tikrikilla region of West Garo Hills when a herd of wild elephants rampaged through their home on Monday night, while a child sustained serious injuries and was rushed to the hospital for medical treatment.

The family was asleep in their home in Nayapara village of Pedaldoba when the wild herd entered the village in search of food and started destroying bamboo dwelling homes.

Elephants from neighbouring Assam and even Bangladesh annually cross over in search of food particularly during the harvest season, in the process destroying standing crops.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.theshillongtimes.com/2017/09/14/elephant-herd-kills-2-women-in-tikrikilla/

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Body Shop campaigns to protect endangered Indian elephant

MUMBAI: The Body Shop announced its latest CSR initiative for the Indian market, of commencing its Bio-Bridge project in Garo Hills, Meghalaya, India.

It has pledged to help protect the endangered Indian Elephant and Western Hoolock Gibbon by constructing the Bio-Bridge with every transaction during a three month-long campaign.

Bio-Bridges aim to address the problem of habitat fragmentation by protecting and regenerating corridors between healthy forest, linking isolated and endangered animals and plant species. This allows animals to travel more widely in search of mates and helps them thrive.

The Body Shop India brand ambassador Jacqueline Fernandez said: "It’s very encouraging to see a beauty brand taking a lead in wildlife conservation and community development."

The Body Shop India COO Shriti Malhotra said, “We are very happy that Garo Hills has been selected as one of the project locations for The Body Shop international Bio-Bridge programme. Having a project in India is a great platform not only to benefit the Garo Hills Biodiversity but also to raise consumer awareness."

Wild Life Trust of India joint director and head - Wild Lands Sunil Kyarong says, “The Garo Green Spine is critical in North East India supporting about a 1000 elephants connecting two treasure houses of biodiversity - the Nokrek and the Balphakram National Park. The campaign will go a long way in helping WTI and WLT to protect the Canopies, Corridors and Catchments of Garo Green Spine for enhancing the survival prospects of wildlife in the region."

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.dthhelp.net/Body-Shop-campaigns-to-protect-endangered-Indian-elephant

Friday, September 15, 2017

Elephant found dead in Corbett

A female elephant was found dead in Corbett Tiger Reserve's Dhela range on Friday. The body of the elephant was found by members of the patrolling team of the reserve.

Corbett director Surendra Mehra ruled out any foul play, as all body parts of the elephant were intact. Experts said the cause of the death was the fight between elephants.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/uttarakhand/elephant-found-dead-in-corbett/457882.html


Elephant dies of electrocution in Jorhat district

Jorhat: An elephant was killed after it touched a high voltage power line inside Katonibari Tea Estate near Mariani Army Cantonment in Jorhat district of upper Assam on Friday a senior Forest department official said.

The elephant was part of a herd of pachyderms which had come out from Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary last night. It got electrocuted after coming in contact with a 11,000 watt high voltage power line passing through the tea estate owned by Assam Tea Corporation Ltd, said Divisional Forest Officer, Jorhat, Sapon Saikia here.

The elephant was thrown to a distance of 200 metres and fell into into a deep gorge after it touched the high voltage power line, Saikia said.

An elephant corridor passes through the tea estate and generally the jumbos do not go towards the power line side after a similar accident happened a couple of years back, the DFO said.

The 27.8 sq km Gibbon Wildlife sanctuary is the home to over 50 wild elephants and other endangered species such as hoolock gibbon.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.eenaduindia.com/states/assam/2017/08/25223345/Elephant-dies-of-electrocution-in-Jorhat-district.vpf

Kumki deployed in Valparai estate as elephant kills man

The Forest Department on Sunday deployed kumki elephant Khaleem at Karumalai estate in Valparai to handle a female wild elephant that trampled a 60-year-old man to death on Saturday.

Valparai Forest Range Officer P. Sakthivel said that deployment of one more kumki from Topslip elephant camp has been sought to handle the 20-year-old elephant that has been roaming in human habitation of Karumalai estate for the last 10 days.

“We are trying to drive the female elephant back to the forest. The task can be done effectively with two kumkis,” said Mr. Sakthivel.

The victim Velusamy was trampled to death by the wild elephant at a graveyard when he was attending the funeral of another resident of the estate. While others managed to escape when chased by the elephant, Velusamy fell on the ground. Residents later staged protest demanding solution from authorities in frequent human-elephant conflict in the estate.

Staff Reporter from Udhagamandalam adds

A 3-year-old female elephant calf was found dead near the Game Hut to Chikallah Road near Onnaratty Junction on Saturday.

E Vijayaraghavan, forest veterinarian, Mudumalai Tiger Reserve, who performed the autopsy, said that the calf had died of stomach ulcer. Samples of the animal’s visceral organs were collected and sent for further analysis.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Coimbatore/kumki-deployed-in-valparai-estate-as-elephant-kills-man/article19571231.ece

Eviction drive to remove encroachers from Amchang wildlife

An eviction drive was carried out in Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary in Guwahati today to free the illegally occupied forest area.

Altogether 300 houses were dismantled and families were asked to leave the illegally occupied forest area during the operation conducted by the Forest department with the support of Kamrup (Metro) District Administration, police, health department, Assam Power Distribution Company Ltd (APDCL), a government release said.

The eviction drive was carried out on the direction of Gauhati High Court.
Two teams conducted eviction drive at Botaghuli and two other teams carried out the drive at Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary behind Veterinary College at Khanapara here.

Deputy Commissioner Kamrup (M) Dr M Angamuthu briefed the teams before the operation not to damage/destroy or burn any belongings of the encroachers and also directed the police to use minimum force for the eviction operation.

Guwahati Commissioner of Police Hiren Nath, Joint Commissioner of Police Diganta Baruah and Chief Conservator of Forest Hara Prasad were also present during the briefing.

The operation included more than 500 police and forest personnel, elephants, cranes, wage labourers with tool kits, to make Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary encroachment free, the release said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/eviction-drive-to-remove-encroachers-from-amchang-wildlife/1/1034221.html

Elephant dies of electrocution in Jorhat district

The elephant was part of a herd of pachyderms which had come out from Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary last night. It got electrocuted after coming in contact with a 11,000 watt high voltage power line passing through the tea estate owned by Assam Tea Corporation Ltd, said Divisional Forest Officer, Jorhat, Sapon Saikia here.

The elephant was thrown to a distance of 200 metres and fell into into a deep gorge after it touched the high voltage power line, Saikia said.

An elephant corridor passes through the tea estate and generally the jumbos do not go towards the power line side after a similar accident happened a couple of years back, the DFO said.

The 27.8 sq km Gibbon Wildlife sanctuary is the home to over 50 wild elephants and other endangered species such as hoolock gibbon.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://m.eenaduindia.com/states/east/assam/2017/08/25223345/Elephant-dies-of-electrocution-in-Jorhat-district.vpf

Mumbai Turf Club supports elephant protection

The Royal Western Indian Turf Club of Mumbai (RWITC) has extended support to the cause of elephant protection by hosting wildlife conservation charity Wildlife SOS for an awareness event about the plight of elephants in India. Senior members of the RWITC and industrialists attended the event to learn about the situation faced by elephants in India. Vivek Jain, Chairman RWITC, said on Friday, "We are all animal lovers - our club centers around animals and we are privileged to support a good cause by raising awareness and helping protect India's elephants."

Wildlife SOS's greatest accolade has been successfully ending the exploitation of bears across India and rescuing over 600 sloth bears from illegal custody. The organization brought about a permanent end to the problem of dancing bears by creating alternative livelihoods and providing education to the people who earned a living from their exploitation, and now has a successful model in place for the rescue and rehabilitation of wildlife.

WSOS has now turned its focus to rescuing and rehabilitating abused circus elephants from across the country. It established the first Elephant Conservation and Care Center (ECCC) in 2010 in Mathura which currently provides critical medical treatment and lifetime care to over 20 rescued elephants. Many of these elephants have spent their entire lives in captivity after being stolen from the wild. The ECCC has specialised medical facilities for elephants like an elephant ambulance, a hydrotherapy pool, digital x-ray, ultrasound, laser therapy etc. that help these broken elephants recuperate and heal. Elephants at the Wildlife SOS Center also receive a carefully calibrated nutritious diet and a high degree of medical care by well-trained elephant veterinarians.

WSOS's aim is to garner financial and moral support from members of the public who never want to see another elephant stolen from its mother, never want to hear of another elephant beaten senseless or trained to give rides and perform tricks in circuses or beg near a temple!


To read the full article, click on the story title

Elephant fed on 200 vada pavs daily sheds 700 kg after rescue

Mumbai: Four years ago, when young Laxmi was rescued from begging outside temples in Mulund,
the 18-year-old could not walk properly and a crane had to lift her on to a truck for her journey to a new life. For, the elephant had been feeding on sugary prasad from temples and 200 vadapavs a day, and had become obese— at 5000 kgs, she was overweight by 1800 kgs. Laxmi’s companion elephant, suffering from similar health issues due to severe neglect, had collapsed and died in front of her eyes.

Today, she not only walks gleefully, but also plays in a pool and wallows in the mud as she has shed
700 kgs during her stay at Mathura’s Elephant Conservation and Care Center (ECCC) run by wildlife
conservation charity Wildlife SOS. She was put on a calibrated diet of green fodder and nutritious vegetables. The abscesses in her feet have now healed and Vitamin D3 supplements keep her arthritis in check.

“For a young elephant of 18 years, being 1,800-kg overweight could have severely impacted her ability to live,” said Kartick Satyanarayan, co-founder of the conservation charity. Elephants life for 40 to 65 years.

“She had those mental scars (the companion’s death),” said Satyanarayan. “She was severely traumatised and frightened of other elephants too.” After four years of love and medical care, she has transformed into a gregarious and playful elephant. She is particularly fond of the bulls, and squeals with excitement whenever she smells or sights one of them while out on her walks. “She is the only one who squeals in this typical happy tone,” says Satyanarayan. She enjoys two walks every day with her friends– Bijli and Chanchal.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Elephant with RED ears is spotted in India

It's almost as if this elephant knows you are talking about him.

Thanks to an unusual pigmentation in his skin, this Asian elephant has been spotted with red ears.

The strange, yet totally natural sight surprised bank worker Jagdeep Rajput, who photographed it during a trip to the Corbett National Park in Uttarakhand, India.

The 56-year-old, from New Delhi, said: 'Due to some natural pigmentation, some elephants have red ears.

'Male elephants are lone wanderers, they mostly stay alone. Occasionally they visit the herd to claim ownership and to mate too.

'Everyone in the national park wanted to see it and photograph it.'

The buzz around the elephant, thought to be over the age of 25, is understandable given its appearance.

To read the full article, click on the story title




Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Wild elephant dies in Kerala’s Munnar after it is chased, attacked with earthmover

A wild elephant that entered a factory premises in Munnar, Kerala, was chased and attacked using an earthmover, leading to its death.

The tusker, Chillikkompan, as the local people affectionately call him, entered the premises of Kannan Devan Hill Plantations (KDHP) in Chenduvara, Munnar, on July 24. Enraged by the encroachment, the factory officials allegedly deputed some men with an earthmover to chase the animal away. The tusker tried to escape but was hammered on his tusk and head by the metal carrier.

The elephant stationed himself some 100 metres from the premises where it died on Tuesday, a day after it was injured.

Munnar is an ecologically sensitive area where man-animal conflicts are common. But the way a young tusker met its gory death has enraged wildlife enthusiasts and local people.

“There are several ways to chase an animal away. Elephants easily go away on bursting crackers or such noises. This was a deliberate act to kill him,” says Mohan Kumar, founder president, Munnar Environment and Wildlife Society (MEWS).

Sebinster Francis, a wildlife photographer and naturalist based in Munnar, involved with elephant projects, says he knew Chillikkompan for years. “It’s like losing a family member. Elephants are generally calm in nature unless in mast (heat) or provoked. They are intelligent and understanding too. Such a brutal end to a wonderful animal is unacceptable,” he says.

After the video of the incident was circulated widely through social media, forest department swung into action. “A criminal case has been filed against the factory and the driver of the earthmover has been arrested. We will probe and take action against other people involved in it too,” said KJ Varughese, principal chief conservator of forests (wildlife) & chief wildlife warden, Kerala. Post-mortem report confirmed internal injuries led to the tusker’s death.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Hyderabadi hunter Nawab Shafath Ali Khan hired to shoot killer elephant

An elephant blamed for killing more than a dozen people in Jharkhand and Bihar was shot dead on Friday.

A team led by well-known hunter Nawab Shafath Ali Khan from Hyderabad, along with veterinarians, had been camping in the higher reaches of Raj Mahal hills of Sahibganj for the goal.

Jharkhand's chief forest and wildlife conservator LR Singh said the decision to kill the elephant came after a week-long operation to try to tranquilise and capture the animal.

"It was quite a hard operation because of the thick bushes and since the animal had turned rogue it charged at us before I pulled the trigger", Mr Khan said.

Violent encounters between elephants and humans were an "increasing trend", said Singh, as vast swathes of forest are cleared for human settlements or industry.

Jharkhand government hired Hyderabad hunter Nawab Shafat Ali Khan to hunt down an elephant which crushed four people in Bihar before crossing into neighbouring Jharkhand killing 11 more. The rocky terrain and thick vegetation and visibility of just 15 feet of Sahibganj district made it impossible for capturing the elephant. "Something must be done", Singh said, referring to one of the poorest indigenous tribal communities in eastern India. "But that's the last resort and we will take a call in a day or two".

"We have a team of experts and hunters here with us". The tusker is believed to have wandered from its herd and got lost.

Of the 11 deaths in the state, nine of the victims were Paharias, Singh said.

"He is one of the best out there".

Khan said it was the seventh elephant he had killed, adding that in the past he had also killed five tigers and eight leopards that had threatened people in other parts of the country.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://expressnewsline.com/2017/08/12/hyderabadi-hunter-nawab-shafath-ali-khan-hired-to-shoot.html

Sunday, September 10, 2017

11% fall in elephant population

World Elephant Day on Saturday brought both good and bad news for wildlife lovers.
First, the good news. Arunachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand have together recorded an increase of
more than 1,200 wild elephants in the last five years as per a Census report released by environment
minister Harsh Vardhan on Saturday.

Now, the bad news: The population of elephants in India has declined by nearly 11% or 3,399 in the
last five years — from 30,711 in 2012 to 27,312 in 2017.

“At this stage, comparisons should not be made (between 2012 and 2017), the reason being the earlier results were based on a mixture of direct and indirect counting methods, as reported by different states,” said the Census report , Synchronised Elephant Population Estimation 2017.

Harsh Vardhan said this time the results were based on the direct count method. The indirect method
includes estimation through elephant dung analysis.

The minister also launched a 15-month-long campaign — Gaj Yatra — to raise awareness about the
shrinking space for India’s wild elephants and their corridors, a probable reason for decline in their population.

The Wildlife Trust of India, which will coordinate the yatra, has mapped a total of 101 elephant
corridors.

Of 24 states surveyed, only eight reported an increase in elephant numbers. Tamil Nadu saw the biggest dip of 1,254 elephants, followed by Karnataka (439).

The report also highlighted the increasing elephant-human conflict with their habitat shrinking in
most states in which over 100 tuskers and 660 people have died since 2015.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.pressreader.com/india/hindustan-times-delhi/20170813/281724089653832

Tusker menace: Forest dept in soup

IDUKKI: Though tusker menace has made headlines in the district, forest department is in a soup as residents are vehemently opposing the move to release captured elephants deep inside the forest.

On April 4, the department captured a rogue tusker Chullikomban from Aralam farm. The elephant had killed six people and destroyed crops in the area. The department then decided to release the tusker at Nelliyampathy .But, residents resisted the move. Then the department decided to transfer the elephant to Kodanad centre.Now the elephant is staying in a temporary shelter near Aralam.

"Recently, we planned to capture rogue tusker Arikomban from Munnar and release it in forest.People's representatives opposed us," said chief wildlife warden K J Varughese.

Forest officials pointed that keeping captured tuskers in cages was not practical.But people fear that when a tusker is released in the forest, it would return to the nearest human habitation."When an elephant is released in forest, it does not return for two days as it tries to create a habitat. There is no chance of it returning to our settlements," said Munnar DFO S Narendra Babu.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kochi/tusker-menace-forest-dept-in-soup/articleshow/60054135.cms

Apathy jolt kills tusker

An adult male elephant was electrocuted in the forests of Chakulia, 70km from here, in the small hours today apparently when he tried to cross a mound of soil dumped for a canal job under the Subernarekha Multipurpose Project.

Jamshedpur DFO Saba Alam Ahmed said the tragedy took place at Bera jungle between 3am and 4am when a herd of 19 elephants was ambling along the under-construction canal.

"The soil, dumped by a civil construction firm, was eight feet high. The mound reduced the gap between the ground and a high-tension overhead transmission line from 18 feet to 10 feet, which is why the tusker came in contact with the wire. An 11KV jolt killed him then and there," Ahmed, who inspected the spot, said.

The DFO said the canal work was part of the multi-crore Subernarekha Multipurpose Project (SMP) and they would raise the issue with the department concerned.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.telegraphindia.com/1170815/jsp/frontpage/story_167312.jsp

Old homes threatened, Indian elephant moves to Haryana, Himachal

India has more than 27,000 elephants according to the elephant census titled ‘Synchronised elephant population estimation India 2017’ released on Saturday.

It is a “healthy” population, according to experts with no major fluctuation seen over years but human-elephant conflicts are definitely on the rise.

The elephant census is also showing an interesting but worrying trend. Many states that never reported any elephant population in previous census have reported elephants, which indicates a gradual expansion in elephant area.

This is of concern because it may lead to more human-elephant conflicts if these states fail to support the population with enough forest cover and adequate habitat for them to settle.

Elephant populations have been reported for the first time from Manipur, Mizoram,Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and the Andaman and Nicobars.

According to elephant expert R Sukumar, this gradual expansion could be due to disturbance in their original areas or due to climate change impacts like temperature and precipitation change. This expansion has been happening gradually over 30 years, he added.

There were 415 human deaths in conflicts cases in 2015-16 and 245 deaths in 2016- February 2017, according to data released by the environment ministry on Saturday.

About 45 elephants died in 2015-16 and 21 died in 2016-February 2017 due to electrocution. The census data shows Karnataka has the highest elephant population at 6,049 followed by Assam at 5,719 elephants. Even though the census data shows a decline in overall elephant population from 29391-30711 in 2012 to 27312 in 2017, experts said this was only due to a difference in the counting method.

Last year, some southern states had adopted both direct count and indirect count method for the census to arrive at more reliable population estimates.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Elephant electrocuted in Jharkhand

A full grown tusker today died when it came in contact with a high tension live wire at Haildajuri village in East Singhbhum district, Forest officials said.

A herd of wild elephants were passing through under-construction canal when a tall pachyderm came in contact with a live high tension live wire and was electrocuted, said Divisional Forest Officer (Dalbhum), S Alam Ansari said.

Owing to dumping at the construction site, Ansari said the gap between the ground and high tension wire shortened, which led to the incident.

Following the post-mortem, he said forest department officials followed all standard operation procedure before the pachyderm was buried.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-elephant-electrocuted-in-jharkhand-2530038

Elephants deployed to clear invasive plant species

Elephants at the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve are being used to clear lantana camara, an invasive species of plant which has taken over vast tracts of the reserve.

Lantana camara, eupatorium and parthenium, have taken over as much as 70 % of MTR. Over the last five years, the Forest Department has been waging a never-ending war with the invasive plants, trying to clear small sections of the weeds from the reserve forest and encouraging the growth of native flora to replace them.

“For a start, we are clearing the plants up to 30 m on roadsides, particularly where where tourism is permitted,” said Srinivas R Reddy, Field Director of the reserve.

Last year, elephants were used to clear up to 88 km of pathway within the reserve. As rain has set in early this year, and the moisture content makes it far easier for elephants to pull out the plants from the soil, it is hoped that the 62 km of pathways will be cleared in the coming weeks.

Apart from the obvious benefits the work to remove the plants has on the forests of Mudumalai, there are benefits for the elephants too, said Mr. Reddy. “One benefit is that they are away from the camp, thereby reducing the build up of pathogens, the elephants get a lot of exercise and because the mahout and the animal have to work together using commands, the training imparted to the elephants is reinforced,” he added.

Nine elephants are involved in the operation to clear lantana in the reserve. By clearing invasive plant species and creating fire-lines as well as patrol-lines for easier forest management, the Forest Department is also helping to encourage the growth of native plant and species of grass, on which herbivores in the reserve depend upon.

Apart from the use of elephants, manpower is also being used by the department to remove the invasive plant species. The process is both expensive and time consuming, with costs for clearing one hectare ranging from ₹ 15,000 to ₹ 40,000, depending on how thick the plants, especially lantana, have grown in clumps together.

“Though it would be ideal to not have any exotic plant species in the reserve, the removal has to be done gradually in phases. The animals have also adapted to the changes to a certain extent, and we need to study how the gradual removal of these plants has an impact on the wildlife here,” added Mr. Reddy.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/states/elephants-deployed-to-clear-invasive-plant-species/article19518764.ece

Saturday, September 09, 2017

Rains likely to bring back jumbos driven out of Tamil Nadu due to drought

Chennai: Severe drought for two consecutive years has reduced the elephant population of Tamil Nadu and it is estimated that about 400 to 500 elephants could have migrated from Tamil Nadu to neighbouring states due to the unprecedented 2016-17 drought, a senior state official said, responding to the recent figures released by the Union ministry of environment of forests, which accounted a decrease of 10 per cent in India's elephant population.

“We knew that three per cent of our population was vulnerable to drought and road accident deaths and another good population migrated to nearby Kerala and Karnataka in search of water,” the official said adding that the state is now a home to 3,500 to 4,000 elephants roughly. And with rains now lashing TN forest areas these pachyderms are expected to return, the official said.

“During dry months, usually from January to April, when there is no rainfall the elephant herds seek the neighbourhood of streams and shady forests”, said conservation scientist Dr A. Kumaraguru, member, Sathyamangalam Tiger Conservation Foundation.

From the month of July, after the first showers, they start roaming and feed on fresh grass. This grass in the hill tracts becomes long and coarse by July and August, and the elephants then show upward movements and this migration is common among elephants, he explains. The reason for the elephants and other animal’s migration into the high land continuous and uninterrupted hilly terrain, is for grazing, assured food and ideal breeding grounds.

To read the full article, click on the story title

200 villagers heave an exhausted elephant from a swamp

A marathon rescue effort saw a group of more than 200 kind-hearted strangers release a chained elephant from swamp in the Kerala, India.

The group spent more than 17 hours trying to help the 45-year-old elephant out of chains after it got trapped while trying to escape captivity.

The elephant called Mullackal Balakrishnan, had broken through barricades and jumped from a truck, where it was being transported from a Temple in the south Indian state.

The majestic animal managed to flee for more than six kilometres before getting trapped in a waterlogged area and got stranded in a marsh.

A team of veterinary doctors injected the animal with glucose throughout the day to save its life - the team emptied water from the swamps and tied ropes to Mullackal, who was loosing consciousness.

'Its legs were chained. But the chain was not interconnected with legs,the elephant had been secured with a rope and four iron rods' Sreekumar Gopi, assistant mahout, told The Times of India.

The elephant was being transported to Mullakkal from Thrikkakara temple where it had been taken to attend a local festival.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858774/200-villagers-heave-exhausted-elephant-swamp.html

Elephant tramples 65-year-old man to death

A 65-year-old brick kiln worker was trampled to death by a wild elephant near Kanuvai on the city outskirts in the early hours of today, police said.

The worker was on his way to the kiln in Kanuvai when the elephant appeared suddenly from behind the bushes and trampled him to death, they added.

Public and kiln workers informed police and forest department officials, who rushed to the place, recovered the body and sent it for post-mortem.

Villagers told the officials that the elephant had been moving around in the area for the last six months and had reportedly killed three persons during the period and sought steps to prevent it from entering human habitats.

Meanwhile, a 75-year-old man was attacked by an elephant at Samayapuram near Mettupalayam, about 45 km from here.

The man was crossing the road at around 6.30 AM, when the elephant attacked him, creating panic among the residents, police said.

After being provided first aid at Mettupalayam government hospital, he was admitted to the government hospital here.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.india.com/news/agencies/elephant-tramples-65-year-old-man-to-death-2458647/

Wild elephant tramples man to death

Coimbatore: A 61-year-old man from Thadagam is suspected to have been killed by a wild elephant on Friday morning.

Local residents had found the body of K Radhakrishnan, an employee of a brickkiln, outside the forest limits just off Anaikatti Road in Chinna Thadagam. "Looks like he was attacked by an elephant when he was on the way to attend nature's calls. He had suffered head injuries. Footprints of an elephant were seen in the area. But, we are still investigating," district forest officer Sathish said.

Forest department officials have been tracking an elephant in the area for the last few days.
People living in and around Thadagam and Mankarai said they had been complaining about elephant movement in the area for several months. An elephant had killed three people in the last six months, they said. The residents also sought permission to store more crackers to scare away elephants.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/coimbatore/wild-elephant-tramples-man-to-death/articleshow/60431681.cms

Friday, September 08, 2017

Elephants force tribal woman to live atop banyan tree in Periyapatna !

Periyapatna: While governments run by various political parties boast about several schemes they have launched for the welfare of tribal population and members of backward communities, here is a classic example in Periyapatna where it shows that many government schemes have just remained on paper, without reaching the deserving population.

The story we are narrating here is that of a woman who is forced to live atop a banyan tree as her hut has been ravaged by wild elephants. She has been living like a tree animal since months and her case proves that governments may come and governments may go but nothing changes on ground despite tall claims by elected representatives.

The woman is Latha, wife of late Ganesh of Karadibokke Tribal Hamlet on the border of Doddaharave Reserve Forest in Periyapatna, the Assembly constituency represented by Congress MLA K. Venkatesh, who is the Chairman of Bengaluru Development Authority. And Periyapatna falls in Chief Minister Siddharamaiah’s home district of Mysuru.

Latha hails from Jenukuruba tribal community and there are over 22 Jenukuruba tribal families living at Karadibokke. The tribals are living there since the last 65 years and they depend on the meagre food facilities provided by the government. Most of the time, they depend on forest roots and edible forest produce for their living. Some of them visit other nearby villages in search of daily wage work.
Latha’s husband Ganesh died four years back owing to illness and she has two children Amulya and Vinu who are studying at the Abbalathi Tribal Ashrama School.

While Amulya is studying in fifth standard, Vinu is studying in the third standard.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Elephant electrocuted by illegal electric fence

An adult male elephant was electrocuted when it came in contact with an illegal electric fencing erected around a farmland in Erathangal village on the periphery of Naickaneri reserve forest (RF) in on Saturday morning.

The incident came to light when the villagers of Erathangal spotted the lifeless body of the elephant. Damodaran, a villager, had taken the piece of land on lease and erected electric fencing to protect the crops from damage by animals such as wild boars. The connection to electrify the fencing was drawn from the supply for the motor pump.

The elephant, aged seven to eight years, had moved to Pernambut range from the Koundenya Wildlife Sanctuary in Andhra Pradesh. It was electrocuted when it came in contact with the electric fencing around the field.

Following this, Dinkar Kumar, conservator of forests, vellore circle, Sumesh Soman, district forest officer, Vellore and Krishnamoorthy, forest range officer of Pernambut inspected the land and conducted an inquiry.

"The elephant comes under Schedule I of the Wildlife Act 1972. We have filed a case under the provisions of the Act and are on the lookout for Damodaran, who has fled after the incident," Mr. Soman said. A postmortem was performed by veterinarian at the spot.

He added that Pernambut range shares border with Andhra Pradesh, and there is frequent movement of elephants. "In Vellore district, Pernambut range is the only area where there is movement of elephants that comes from the sanctuary. As crops are being damaged by wild animals frequently, we are compensating farmers accordingly," he said.

Last year, the department disbursed compensation over Rs 9 lakh. Of this, more than 50% has been given to the farmers in Pernambut range, he said and added that around Rs 4 lakh disbursed to the farmers as compensation for the crop damage this year. Of these, Rs 2 lakh has been given to the farmers in Pernambut.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/elephant-electrocuted-by-illegal-electric-fence/articleshow/60137844.cms

Injured elephant calf sees a mother in the mahout

It is almost a month since the 11-month-old elephant calf, that was rescued from Krishnagiri, was brought to the Theppakadu Elephant Camp in the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (MTR). The calf, which is recuperating well from its injuries suffered at the hands of feral dogs, has formed an indomitable bond with its mahout, Bomman, and this is helping with its rehabilitation.

The calf, which had suffered injuries all over its body after it was abandoned by its herd in Denkanikottai, was raised by Mr. Bomman soon after it was found.

The mahout, who travelled to Krishnagiri and stayed with the animal for two months, takes care of the calf all through the day and the two have become inseparable.

“There is a huge difference in the animal from when I first saw it. It has gained weight and has become very active and playful,” he said and added that the calf has begun feeding well and has lost all signs of nervousness, which he first displayed when brought to Theppakadu.

The mahout stays with the animal all day and night, and lives in the krall where the calf is housed. Such is the attachment that the calf has with the mahout that he calls out to Mr. Bomman when he is not around, and apparently gets upset when left alone for too long by the mahout, who has become a sort of maternal figure for the animal.

“I cannot even go and eat out of his eyesight, or else he starts calling for me,” says Mr. Bomman and is confident that the animal will make a full recovery.

Deputy Director of MTR V.A. Saravanan said that the animal was showing encouraging signs of improvement, but added that the forest department would have to be vigilant till it becomes at least three years old.

Heaters have been fitted in the calf's enclosure to ensure that it doesn’t feel too cold.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/injured-elephant-calf-sees-a-mother-in-the-mahout/article19530706.ece?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=RSS_Syndication


Elephant tramples 60-year-old woman to death

A 60-year-old woman was today trampled to death by an elephant in Mudumalai Tiger Reserve area.

The woman was returning home with her goats when she came across a herd of elephants.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/elephant-tramples-60-year-old-woman-to-death-117082101201_1.html

Woman trampled to death by elephant

A 50-year-old woman was trampled to death by an elephant at Alandurai on Tuesday morning. The woman, identified as T. Saradha of Pettavaithalai in Tiruchi, had migrated with her relatives to Coimbatore as daily wager. In the small hours of Tuesday, the woman had stepped out of her house to attend nature’s call when an elephant attacked her.

On information, the Forest Department staff rushed to the spot and chased away the elephant to the forest. The Alandurai Police have registered a case in this connection.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Coimbatore/woman-trampled-to-death-by-elephant/article19540560.ece?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=RSS_Syndication

Thursday, September 07, 2017

Wild elephant tramples woman farmworker to death

Coimbatore: A 50-year-old woman farmworker was trampled to death by a wild elephant near Pattiyarkovilpathy village on Narasipuram-Isha Yoga Center Road on Tuesday.

The deceased was identified as Saradha, wife of Thavasi, a native of Pettavaithalai in Trichy, forest department officials said. "She had arrived in Pattiyarkovilpathy along with her family a week ago to harvest small onions from a field at Ponnusamy Gounder Thottam near Pattiyarkovilpathy. They were staying in a house inside the farmland. Saradha had gone to attend nature's call around 6.45am. Her daughter-in-law, who ventured out in search of Saradha after she heard an elephant trumpet, found her mangled body," an official said.

The daughter-in-law alerted the villagers, who rushed to the spot and informed forest department officials. The body was sent to the Coimbatore Medical College and Hospital (CMCH) for post-mortem and was later handed over to the family.

Forest department officials gave Rs 50,000 to the family as immediate relief. They will be given Rs 3.5 lakh soon as compensation, department officials said.

"We had warned the villagers not to venture into agriculture fields till 8am as there were a lot of elephants in the area," an official said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/coimbatore/wild-elephant-tramples-woman-farmworker-to-death/articleshow/60182588.cms

Elephant killed after knocked down by Sikkim bound truck on Sevok Road

An elephant was knocked down and killed by a Sikkim bound truck on Sevok Road under Kurseong sub-division near here, the forest department officials said today, The sub-adult tusker was the habitat of the Mahananda protected forest range area. The knock down happened at wee hours today near 7th Mile area when the pachyderm was crossing the road. The truck was confiscated by the forest officials.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://news.webindia123.com/news/articles/india/20170824/3174406.html

Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Over 80 elephants killed every year due to human-elephant conflict

The main reasons of elephant deaths are electrocution, train accidents, poaching and poisoning, according to environment ministry data.

With increasing human-wildlife conflict, at least 80 elephants are killed every year in India on an average, totalling up to 655 deaths in the last eight years, environment ministry data showed.

The main reasons were electrocution, train accidents, poaching and poisoning.

The data comes just after the recently released Elephant Census 2017, which revealed that the population of Asian elephants—India's national heritage animal and an endangered and protected species—has declined in the last five years. As per the preliminary results of the Census, elephants numbered 27,312 across 23 states.

This means a decline of about 10% as the population has decreased by about 3,000, compared to the last census in 2012, when it was estimated at around 30,000 (29,391-30,711). In 2007, it was estimated at about 27,670 (27,657-27,682).

Also Read: India’s elephant population decreases by 10% to 27,312

According to environment ministry data seen by Mint, a total of 655 elephants were killed between 2009-10 and 2016-17. This translates into an average of about seven every month and one every four days.

Of them, poisoning killed 44, poaching 101, train accidents 120 and electrocution 390.

In the last eight years, the deadliest was 2010-11, when 106 were killed, followed by 105 in 2012-13 and 89 in 2009-10.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Elephant Stuck in a Marsh in Kerala: Rescue Operation Underway

In the wee hours of Tuesday, Mullakkal Balakrishnan noticed that the lorry in which he was being transported had stopped on the road. After waiting for a few minutes, he decided to jump off the lorry, and ran amok. An hour later, he fell into a marsh and has been trapped in it ever since.

Balakrishnan is a tusker owned by the Mullakkal temple under Travancore Devaswom Board in Alappuzha district, and the locals, mahouts, police, Devaswom representatives and officials of the forest department have been trying in vain to rescue him.

Rescue Operation is Underway

Mullakkal Balakrishnan was being transported to the temple to take part in a festival. Around 3 am, the driver of the lorry in which he was being taken stopped at Thuravoor to get some tea. The elephant broke the safety barriers at this point and jumped off the lorry.

Desperate to escape, Balakrishnan then ran amok for over an hour, and in the process, he damaged several vehicles and broke the compound wall of a house.

But as he got to a distance of 2 km from where the lorry stopped, the tusker fell into a marsh.
Local residents soon alerted the police, who rushed to the spot.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Sunday, September 03, 2017

Nawab Shafat Ali Khan kills rogue elephant in Jharkhand

Renowned sharp shooter from Hyderabad, Nawab Shafat Ali Khan has shot down a rogue elephant on Friday which had killed 11 people in Sahebganj district of Jharkhand and four people in neighbouring Bihar apart from wrecking havoc in many villages by destroying homes and fields of tribals.

Khan said that he reached Jharkhand on August 9 on invitation from the state government to bring down the elephant after efforts by teams of forest department staff from Jharkhand and WB did not bear fruit.

Elephant is an endangered species protected under Schedule-I of the Wildlife Protection Act. However, Khan said that he tried his best to tranquilize the elephant before killing it. He said, “The forest was very thick and there were intermittent rains. The visibility was very restricted. It was proving very difficult to take aim. Moreover, tracking the elephant was also becoming tough. Overnight the elephant was travelling as far as 20 kilometers and was destroying homes of people and injuring them. So, the decision to shoot it had to be taken.”

Khan said that he had a brush with death before taking down the elephant with his .458 Winchester magnum rifle.

He said, “The elephant charged at me and was just ten meters away when I took my shot. It was a narrow escape for me.”

Khan, who is advisor to forest departments of five States, has killed seven such elephants till now and is called for his services across the country.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.newsjs.com/url.php?p=http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/telangana/2017/aug/13/nawab-shafat-ali-khan-kills-rogue-elephant-in-jharkhand-1642530.html

Friday, September 01, 2017

Gates to be constructed to allow the traffic of elephants across borders

The migration of illegal population from Bangladesh to India is a serious point of debate between both neighbours. While New Delhi has always maintained that there is a large-scale influx from across the border, Dhaka has refused to agree that these migrants are their citizens.

On 27 July, 2017 officials of both nations came to a decision to construct gates along the border to facilitate the ‘free and safe passage’ for wild elephants.

India’s director general of forest Siddhanta Das commented,  “Trans-border migration of animals is a natural process. But due to erection of border fences, there have been occasions when elephants have broken barriers to continue on their route. The gates will allow them safe passage.”

Officials have marked 12 points in Meghalaya and one in Assam along the border, which are currently used by wild elephants to travel to Bangladesh, where the gates will be constructed.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://www.indiahub.com/flash-news/national/gates-constructed-traffic-elephants-borders/

Man Crushed To Death While Taking Selfie With Elephant

A 30-year-old man was trampled to death by an elephant at the Bannerghatta Biological Park on Tuesday, after he and his friends sneaked into the park to take selfies with the elephant.

The New Indian Express reports that Tuesday is a holiday for the park, but Abhilash and his friends sneaked in and started taking selfies with Sundar the elephant.

The newspaper reported that two of the friends stayed near their bikes to drink alcohol, the other two began taking photos with Sundar.

A senior official at of the park told Bangalore Mirror, "He parked his bike near the Hakki-Pikki Colony located behind the BBP safari area and sneaked into the park illegally along with a couple of his friends. As he was reportedly clicking selfies in front the elephant named Sundar, it had attacked him and trampled him to death."

The New Indian Express reports that he Abhilash was the only son of a Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation bus conductor, and was working with a company in Bangalore's Koramangala.

The man's parents have identified his body and the bike that was parked at Hakki-Pikki Colony.

Bangalore Mirror reports that the parents have lodged a complaint against the park because they were enraged about the lack of security there.

Selfie death are not uncommon in India. Earlier in May this year, a man was crushed to death while taking a selfie in front of an approaching train.

In another incident in March, a teenager was electrodcuted after coming in contact with a high tension wire while taking a selfie above a stationary goods train near Hazrat Nizamuddin railway station.

In fact, it was reported in 2016 that India had seen the highest number of selfie deaths in the entire world in 2015. Of at least 27 selfie death across the world, half were reportedly in India.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.huffingtonpost.in/2017/07/27/man-crushed-to-death-while-taking-selfie-with-elephant_a_23051194/

Man trampled to death by elephant

A man was trampled to death by an elephant inside the Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve (STR) forest department officials said here today. They said he was part of a group of four men who ventured into the Pudukkadu forest area in STR yesterday morning in search of their buffaloes, which had entered the forest for grazing but did not return. The officials said movement of wild animals is high in the area.

While they were searching, the elephant emerged from behind a thicket and attacked. The four took to their heels, but one Thangaraj (24) slipped and was trampled to death by the pachyderm. The others escaped and informed forest department officials, who rushed to the spot and found the body of the man.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/man-trampled-to-death-by-elephant/1/1015400.html

Elephant herd damages crops

Four wild elephants damaged ragi, tomato, cabbage and paddy crops on two acres near Denkanikottai in Krishnagiri district in the early hours of Tuesday.

The herd had come out of the Denkanikottai reserve forest on July 28, villagers said. "They were camping near Denkanikottai village for the last four days. They raided my field and damaged ragi, tomatto and cabbage," P Kandasamy of Pattalamman temple area told TOI.

Followed by the raid, farmers in Denkanikottai urged the forest department officials to chase the elephants back into the deep forest.

The officials said that they are monitoring the movement of the elephants. "We are camping at the forest border until the elephants are chased to Karnataka reserve forest," an official said.

Kandasamy said he suffered nearly Rs 5 lakh worth loss in the elephant raid. "Human-elephant conflict has started in the area after a gap of two months," he said.

Meanwhile, farmers from villages near Denkanikottai demanded the officials to give compensation to the damaged crops at the earliest.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/salem/elephant-herd-damages-crops/articleshow/59871298.cms

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Protocol to be signed with India for elephant management

Bangladesh will sign a protocol with India to strengthen mutual cooperation for the better management of trans-boundary elephants as many big mammals enter Bangladesh every year, increasing human-elephant conflicts.

"On July 27 last, we held the 2nd Indo-Bangladesh Dialogue on Trans-boundary Conservation of Elephants in Shillong. During the meeting, we (both the countries) agreed to sign a protocol on trans-boundary elephant management," said conservator of forests (wildlife and nature conservation) Jahidul Kabir.

He said Bangladesh Forest Department and its Indian counterpart are now working sincerely to prepare a protocol in this regard and the legal instrument is expected to be signed by 2018.

"Once the protocol is signed between Bangladesh and India, it'll give guidelines on how wild elephants will be managed if they cross the border," Kabir told UNB on the occasion of World Elephant Day, observed on Saturday (Aug 12).

Earlier, the forest conservator said, there are 59 crossing points of elephants in bordering areas, but now it declines to 39 points. "We're talking to our counterpart so that the border at these points could be kept open round the clock for the free movement of elephants."

Asian elephants are migratory animals. They can cover considerable distance within a short period of time. In forests, elephant herds follow a well-defined migration route. The survival of this mega species largely depends on corridors and routes because they allow elephants to safely migrate, access food sources, and establish crucial genetic links between herds.

The presence of traffic on roads, construction of steep retaining walls, barbed-wire fences, and the presence of human population along the corridor and routes can limit the migration of elephants that ultimately hinders the genetic diversity.

According to a new study, 'Status of Asian Elephants in Bangladesh' jointly conducted by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Bangladesh and Bangladesh Forest Department, a total of 39 natural crossing points that elephants use regularly to migrate between Bangladesh and neighbouring countries.


To read the full article, click on the story title

15-month-long ‘Gaj Yatra’ to promote elephant conservation

Union Forest Minister Harsh Vardhan on Saturday launched a 15-month-long campaign — Gaj Yatra — to raise awareness about the shrinking space for India’s wild elephants and their corridors.
Over the next 15 months, the Gaj Yatra will do roadshows across 12 elephant states.

The Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), which is leading the campaign, also launched the second edition of its publication “Right to Passage”, which found and mapped a total of 101 elephant corridors in 2017.

The last 2005 edition of “Right to Passage” had declared a total of 88 elephant corridors across 22 elephant states.

Gaj Yatra, which is partnered by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), is the biggest-ever event planned around India’s wild elephants.

Harsh Vardhan, WTI Executive Director and CEO Vivek Menon, and actor and WTI Brand Ambassador Dia Mirza flagged off the campaign marking the World Elephant Day.

“In the recent past, a lot has been spoken about how elephants are being endangered and the measures that need to be taken to protect them. We are hopeful that through this campaign, man-elephant conflicts will reduce,” the minister said.

According to experts, Asian elephants now occupy a meagre 3.5 per cent of their historical range. The vanishing corridors or passages within the forests through which the animal migrates without human disturbance is the biggest stumbling block in the way of conservation.

“When WTI produced the first edition of ‘Right of Passage’ in 2005, we had mapped 88 elephant corridors. In this second edition, there are 101, which shows that elephant habitats have become more fragmented,” said Vivek Menon, adding that the Gaj Yatra campaign aimed to take “Gajah” (elephant) to the “Prajah” (people).

He added the Asian elephant was a keystone species on whose broad back so much of India’s rich biodiversity rested.

“We share our country with the largest number of Asian elephants. However, in recent years our wild lands have been steadily destroyed and degraded, posing a serious threat to elephants,” said Mirza.
She also participated in a walk and run event organised on the occasion, along with children.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.india.com/news/agencies/15-month-long-gaj-yatra-to-promote-elephant-conservation-2397138/

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Elephant calf reunited with wild herd in India

A displaced female elephant calf was rescued near the Pagladiya River on the fringes of the Barnadi Wildlife Sanctuary in Bodoland Territorial Area District (BTAD), Assam. The IFAW-WTI Mobile Veterinary Service team based out of Basbari, Manas National Park responded to the local forest department’s request for assistance. The following is a first-person account by Dr. Bhaskar Choudhury, WTI’s Head Veterinarian (Northeast), of the events that followed. --RGC

When the team reached the location along the Pagladiya River, we were able to conduct a preliminary physical examination of the elephant calf, which we estimated to be two to three months old. Fortunately, I found no discernible congenital deformity or serious injury. We provided oral rehydration salts to stabilise the calf. In conjunction with forest department staff we began investigating the presence of any nearby wild elephant herds. Being able to reunite a displaced elephant calf with her mother or natal herd is the ideal outcome of a rescue situation.

Local community members were of great help and soon located a family of three females and two calves across the river. The family tried to cross the river but could not negotiate the swift current, which was especially dangerous for the young calves. Meanwhile, the rescued calf was beginning to show signs of acute dehydration, so we administered a sedative and intravenous fluids.

As darkness set in, we drove out of the forest with the calf and encountered a herd of 20-odd elephants. One of the females charged at our vehicles. We decided to take a chance: I reversed the anaesthesia and removed the intravenous line, and helped the team unload the calf and guide her towards the herd.

With the headlights of our vehicles lighting the way, the calf walked about 20 metres before we cut the lights and reversed the vehicles. As the calf cried out, an adult elephant approached her and soon the rest of the herd followed. From a distance, we could soon hear rumbling and other vocalisations from the herd.

The sounds diminished as the herd and the calf disappeared into a thicket near the forest road. We waited at least an hour before we left the area. The next morning we returned to check for any signs of the herd – or the calf, in case she had been rejected.

One of the most encouraging parts of this incident was the demeanour of the local people. They are on the frontlines of human-elephant interaction, bearing crop losses, injuries and even the deaths of their kin. Despite any negative encounters, people all over Assam still worship elephants. Everyone prayed for the elephant calf to be reunited with her mother and it seems their prayers have in some way bore fruit.

Amidst the many upsetting scenarios and conflicts that a conservationist, and especially a wildlife veterinarian, must confront every day, this sort of community attitude provides fresh hope.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.ifaw.org/united-states/news/elephant-calf-reunited-wild-herd-india

Sunday, August 27, 2017

K’taka team coming to capture elephant

A team of forest officials from Karnataka will be arriving here soon to capture the lone tusker roaming in the district. Forest minister Sudhir Mungantiwar said that he has communicated with the Karnataka government and the team will arrive soon.

Five people from Ajara taluka were injured in tusker attack last week. The tusker has been roaming in the fields and damaging crops since last month.

A delegation of Shiv Sena led by district president Sanjay Pawar met Mungantiwar on Monday and urged for action against the tusker.

"The villagers are afraid to go to the fields. The tusker also appears during the day time and damages crop. The government should take immediate steps to address this issue as the lives of people are in danger," Pawar said.

Mungantiwar said, "The issue will be addressed within two days. A team of experts from Karnataka will capture the tusker. People need not worry. Forest officials are doing their best to address the issue."

According to forest department officials, they, along with the civic administration and farmers, are trying to restrict the elephant from entering the fields by using firecrackers, chilly smoke and fencing of farms. But these measures have failed so far.

"Two years ago the forest department had captured three elephants near Kankavali tehsil in Sindhudurg district by using skilled personnel. We have requested the department to catch the tusker in Kolhapur district as early as possible and relieve us from the fear that the tusker may appear in front of us any time," said a senior citizen from Ajara taluka.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolhapur/ktaka-team-coming-to-capture-elephant/articleshow/60181676.cms?from=mdr

Friday, August 25, 2017

Sick elephant dies, calf rescued

According to a source, one Ramu spotted the elephant lying unconscious and its calf roaming around as he was passing by Pappathi Farm in Jarathal around 6am and informed the villagers.

People soon gathered at the spot and alerted the forest department. The villagers made an attempt to feed sugarcane and corn to the animals, but the calf didn't let them approach its mother elephant.

Forest officials, along with veterinary doctor Asokan, reached the spot. This time too, the calf didn't allow the veterinary doctor to approach the adult elephant to offer treatment. Asokan subsequently tranquilised the calf to provide medical help to the adult elephant. But, the elephant died.

The forest officials rescued the calf and took it to Sennampatti forest range. "We are providing treatment to the calf," they said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/coimbatore/sick-elephant-dies-calf-rescued/articleshow/60199748.cms


Thursday, August 24, 2017

Elephant herd creates havoc in Jharsuguda

Taking advantage of the dry reservoir of Hirakud, a herd of elephant have entered into the Jharsuguda district and create havoc destroying vegetables and houses.Forest department officials said the elephants from Debrigarh sanctuary from one end of the reservoir reached Lakhanpur area on the other end of the reservoir few days back. And due to plenty availability of food and vegetables they are in no mood to return to their parent place in Debrigarh and Barpahad.

A herd of 19 elephants from Debrigarh forest entered Lakhanpur in Jharsuguda district a month back as the reservoir was completely dry. They moved round the forest areas ,the human habitations and villages of the Lakhanpur block of the district.A few days back they entered into the house of one Gouranga Khadia of Pujaripali village and ate 10 bags of paddy. They also caused severe damage to his house, sources from Jharsuguda forest department said.

"From June 15, these elephants are creating immense damage to the villages. We drove them towards Chhattisgarh but they came back again," said Belpahar Forester Hemanta Sahu.Jharsuguda DFO Susanta Kumar said that the elephants are moving in and around the Hirakud reservoir and sometimes entering villages. "But if we break their group, they will be very wild. Hence, we are keeping a watch on them and would drive them away at a suitable time," the DFO said.But the panicked villagers wanted the forest department to become more active and drive the elephants to Barpahad again before rise of water level in Hirakud reservoir otherwise they will stay in this new area and create more damage.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:https://news.webindia123.com/news/Articles/India/20170717/3148636.html

2 arrested for smuggling 5kg ivory in UP

Two men were arrested in Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh for allegedly smuggling 5kg ivory, police said today.

The traffickers were arrested by the Special Task Force of the Uttar Pradesh Police, with the help of Wildlife SOS, an NGO working for animal rights, and the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau.

"They were arrested while travelling in an SUV from Pratapgarh to Allahabad," Arvind Chaturvedi, Additional SP of UPs STF said.

A non-bailable warrant had been pending against one of the accused for illegally holding an elephant captive.

"It appeared that the accused chopped off the elephants tusk for ivory. The ivory has been seized," the officer said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/2-arrested-for-smuggling-5kg-ivory-in-up/1/1001403.html