Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Widening elephant corridors via compensatory afforestation

Forest Department aims to facilitate their free movement and reduce conflicts
In a move that could augur well for the future of elephants, the Forest Department is set to procure large swathes of revenue land abutting identified elephant corridors to facilitate their free movement at critical links along the established migratory path.

Deputy Conservator of Forests of MM Hills V. Yedukondalu told The Hindu that the focus area will be around the M.M. Hills Wildlife Sanctuary and the Biligiriranga Tiger Reserve, where companies will purchase private land and transfer it to the Forest Department.

P. Sridhar, PCCF (Head of Forest Force), said that it was being promoted under the compensatory afforestation scheme in which industries allotted land, anywhere in the State, have to compensate for it by procuring private land abutting forest boundaries.

The thrust is on procuring land abutting forest corridors to ease wildlife migration and reduce human-animal conflict on the fringes.

About 125 acres of land at Badarayanahalli have already been procured by a private firm and the process of transferring it to the Department is on.

“We have identified suitable land to widen the existing elephant and wildlife corridors besides sensitive areas close to the forest boundary where animals tend to come out and stray into human habitation,” said the official.

In all, nearly 1000 acres have been identified for procurement in the long run, said Mr. Yedukondalu.

The Edayarahalli-Doddasampige corridor is also set for expansion for which the authorities have planned to procure 150 acres of land.

“The corridor connects the Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple and MM Hills wildlife sanctuaries and is at present around 1.5 km in length. We plan to extend it by another 500 metres and widen the existing corridor to 2 km,” said the official.

Of the 150 acres proposed, around 100 acres will be on the MM Hills side close to Budipadaga village.

Incidentally, an NGO, Wildlife Trust of India, procured nearly 25 acres of land from farmers and handed it over to the State government to secure the Edayarahalli-Doddasampige corridor some years ago and the same was poised for expansion.

Santosh Kumar, wildlife activist, said the plan was welcome provided the local community volunteered to surrender the land besides being paid the market rate as compensation.

However, Mr. Yedukondalu said that people were keen to sell their land as agriculture was under rain-fed conditions and seasonal.

“This is a win-win situation for both the local community and wildlife and will help mitigate conflicts,” he added.

The bulk of the proposed acquisition will be in Chamarajanagar district which is home to Bandipur, BRT Tiger Reserve, MM Hills Wildlife Sanctuary and Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary, which support nearly 3,000 elephants and the land acquisition will widen their migratory path and ease their movement.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/karnataka/widening-elephant-corridors-via-compensatory-afforestation/article24647507.ece

India’s growing population draws elephants and humans into conflict with deadly consequences on both sides The Indian government told parliament last year that 1,100 people had been killed in the previous three years



On the day Yogesh became another of the dozens of Indians trampled to death each year, the coffee plantation worker knew from the fire crackers set off nearby that danger was at hand.

“Everything happened so fast. The elephant suddenly emerged from behind the bushes, trampled him and disappeared,” his younger brother Girish said.

The 48-year-old from the southern state of Karnataka, home to India’s largest elephant population with more than 6,000 jumbos, 20 per cent of the country’s total, left behind a wife and two children.

As India’s population grows, people are encroaching into habitats where until now the elephant, not man, has been king, with painful effects for both parties.

The Indian government told parliament last year that 1,100 people had been killed in the previous three years.

The elephants too are paying a heavy price with around 700 fatalities in the last eight years across the country.

Most were killed by electric fences, poisoned or shot by locals angry at family members being killed or crops being destroyed, and accidents on railway cutting through ancient migratory routes. And Karnataka, which is also part of the wider southern region criss-crossed by over 10,000 of the mighty tusked beasts weighing up to five tonnes, is on the frontline.

“At present we have an annual death rate of around 30 to 40 people in the state,” said C Jayaram, Karnataka’s chief wildlife warden.

The Indian government, like many other stakeholders in the complex and tragic situation, appears undecided about what best to do.

“It is very difficult to escape our population or development pressure,” a senior government official said. “Unless it’s addressed, all of us just have to learn to live with the reality of such encounters.”


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Thursday, August 09, 2018

Elephant corridors getting fragmented: Sharma


New Delhi, Jul 30 (PTI) Traditional corridors of elephants and their habitats have been “fragmented” due to utilisation of forest land for agricultural purposes and development works, including construction of irrigation dams and railway lines, the government said today.

In a written reply in the Rajya Sabha, Minister of State for Environment Mahesh Sharma said this fragmentation has caused “human-elephant” conflict.

In 2017-18 (up to November 2017), 275 people have been killed due to “human-elephant” conflict while an ex gratia amount of Rs 590.76 lakh has been awarded, he said.

The minister said in 2016-17, 515 persons were killed and a compensation of Rs 1477.959 lakh was given.

“The traditional corridors of elephants and their habitats have been fragmented due to utilisation of forest land for agricultural purposes, development works like hydro-electric power process, irrigation dams, canals, transmission lines, rail lines, roads etc. Such fragmentation has caused human elephant conflict,” Sharma said.

He said securing of elephant corridors, including acquisition of land and removal of encroachments along the corridors, is the responsibility of state governments, although the ministry provides financial and technical assistance to states for this.

The ministry has requested all states through letters sent on August 24 and November 17 last year, and May 1 this year to protect elephant corridors for the long-term conservation of Asian elephants, Sharma said.

He said the ministry has also advised them to acquire land for this purpose, if required.

“Some states have secured some elephant corridors by procuring the private lands or by relocating the families from the areas falling within these corridors,” the minister said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.india.com/news/agencies/elephant-corridors-getting-fragmented-sharma-3195471/


Tuskers hit again, six quarters devastated



The attacks on human habitation by tuskers continue unabated in different tea-gardens adjacent to forests in Alipurduar. As the herd of tuskers are targeting quarters of the locals, panic and anger prevail among them.
After death of a person in Alipurduar in elephant-attack, similar experience was gathered by the habitants of Tasti tea-garden in Falakata block when a herd of tuskers devastated six quarters together on Sunday night.
Although the locals could just save their lives, the tuskers caused a huge ruin to their properties.
Manju Kharia, a labourer said, “Three elephants attacked our quarter first. As we ran away, the jumbos consumed the crops kept inside and also the homemade liquor. Soon, three other tuskers joined and indulged in rampaging the other quarters.”
She alleged that no help was offered by the forest officials on time. “We are frustrated. No one is taking any action. We are regularly losing lives and properties,” she said.
Although no official reaction could be availed by forest officials, a senior forest-staff preferring anonymity said that shortage of staff was a problem to rush to all spots on time. (EOIC)

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://echoofindia.com/alipurduar-tuskers-hit-again-six-quarters-devastated-140402

Jumbo herd wreaks havoc Elephants target grain stocks at homes

"Our house was attacked from two sides. We were terrified. Besides taking away the maize stock, the elephants damaged a bed and a chair kept on the veranda. We stay cooped up inside the house and came out only after an hour after the herd left," he added.

Divisional forest officer of Dhanbad Saurabh Chandra said a quick response team was deputed towards the western side of Tundi Pahad where the herd was staying for the last three days after its arrival from Giridih.

"We didn't expect the elephants to come down from the eastern side as it was not the usual route. Our team comprising 15 persons, including torchmen and members of quick response team, reached the village around 2.30pm," he said.

According to Chandra, the preliminary report suggests that at least eight houses had been damaged.

"We will provide compensation to all eight families within 15 days of the submission of application. The compensation amount will be decided after the detailed assessment of damage and its extent. It will also depend on whether the house was kachha or pucca," he said.

The divisional forest officer said their immediate plan was to restrict the herd to Tundi Pahad.

"it would serve as an ideal place for the elephants because of its dense foliage and presence of water" Chandra said, added that they also requesting people not to keep mahua in their houses as elephants are attracted by its smell.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/jharkhand/jumbo-herd-wreaks-havoc-248744?ref=jharkhand-new-stry

Pachyderm woes worry villagers in Wokha

Dimapur, July 25 (EMN): Wild elephants entering human habitats in Wokha district have left behind a trail of destruction and fear. The public of stated area is reported to be living in constant fear, community organisations have informed.

A joint press release issued by the chairmen of Old Riphyim Village Council and New Riphyim Village Council, was received here on Wednesday. It stated that wild elephants have damaged paddy fields, and crops in said villages.

They have reported that a herd of about 20 wild Asian elephants was spotted by villagers at an area called Tchukhum, located at a quarry a few kilometres away from a helipad, on the morning of July 23.

The incident is stated to have happened close on the heels of a report by a district committee about the loss of human life and damage to crops and properties by wild animals.

The villages reported that the presence of wild elephants in their only cultivable land and forest was becoming a threat to the lives of the people in the area. It is causing frustration among the farming community of Old and New Riphyim villages, it informed. It was reported that wild elephants had been venturing closer to human settlements every year, and posing a threat to humans and the elephants alike.

A district forest officer said that the area was badly affected. The source informed that the same herd of elephants had been around for a while in the area because there are “many things to eat in the fields,” the source said when contacted.

While acknowledging the plight of the people, the source said it was impossible to ‘take the elephants away in such a terrain.’ It was informed that partial funding was given to the affected farmers from ‘Project Elephant,’ which is a project that caters to elephant reserves.

The officer asserted that the matter was not an ‘elephant menace’ but a ‘human-elephant conflict.’ “There is a need to do a lot more for this issue especially in Wokha as 50% of elephants in Nagaland is in this district,” the source said.

Cultivation and plantations in the vicinity are not safe and piggery and dairy farm projects have been abandoned also because of the fear of elephants, it was informed.

As the majority of the population there are cultivators, it stated, they depend solely on farming and green produce for livelihood. With the crops on the verge of being harvested, there seems to be a growing apprehension among the farmers that their crops would be damaged by the elephants unless the government takes measures, the statement added.

The villagers have appealed to the Nagaland government to offer compensation for the loss caused by the elephants. The authorities have been urged to assess the impact of the issue on farmers.

In the country, it is informed that nearly 350 deaths occur every year due to man-elephant conflict. According to a report of the Union Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change, over 12000 hectares were reportedly damaged during 2013-14.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.easternmirrornagaland.com/pachyderm-woes-worry-villagers-in-wokha/

Monday, August 06, 2018

Wild tusker kills nine year old boy in Odisha

A nine-year-old boy was trampled to death, while his mother and infant sister were seriously injured by a wild tusker in Odisha's Keonjhar district, police said today.

The incident happened yesterday at Khuntakata village under the jurisdiction of Bansapal police station, the police said.

The jumbo stormed into the victim's house late last night and trampled the boy to death when his mother was trying to escape with both the children, police said.

While the 9-year-old boy was killed on the spot, his mother and five-month-old sister received serious injuries, a police officer said.

They were admitted to a hospital at Bansapal initially, he said, adding, after some time they were shifted to the district headquarters hospital here since their condition deteriorated.

Irate villagers staged a road blockade for some time and demanded that concrete steps should be taken to save the locals from elephant attacks, the officer said.

The villagers also demanded adequate compensation for the family of the deceased, the officer added.

The blockade was lifted after assurance from the officials, he said.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.devdiscourse.com/Article/91976-wild-tusker-kills-nine-year-old-boy-in-odisha

Tusker kills 10-yr-old


Rourkela: A 10-year-old boy was killed by an elephant on Wednesday night when he was sleeping with his mother in their house at Amurudi village in Sankhposh gram panchayat.

The deceased, Biswanath Munda, had lost his father two years ago.

A herd of elephants, which was roaming in the area, came nearer the village. One male elephant, aged about seven years, got separated from the herd and barged into the village. This lone elephant was searching for food, said villagers. "It was all alone and was apparently searching for food," said Samanta Munda, a villager.

The villagers came together to drive it away. In the process, the enraged elephant found itself in front of the house of the deceased. It suddenly barged in and broke down a portion of the kuchha wall. Biswanath's mother Shanti and the two children tried to escape from the scene. The younger child and the mother went in one direction and Biswanath went another way. However, he came face to face with the elephant and it lifted him with its trunk and banged on the ground.

Rourkea divisional forest officer Sanjay Swain said: "The villagers were in no position to do anything. The deceased's family has been given Rs 20,000 immediately for the boy's cremation. Another sum of Rs 3.8 lakh will be given to them within two months. We have given polythene to the family to cover the damaged portion of the house and another sum of Rs 2,000 to repair the house. Besides, we are also going to write to the collector to sanction Biju pucca ghar for the families, whose dwellings are damaged in such circumstances."

Biswanath is the 14th victim of elephant killing in the district this year.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/tusker-kills-10-yr-old-249549

India's population growth worsens elephant-human conflict

ON the day Yogesh became another of the dozens of Indians trampled to death each year, the coffee plantation worker knew from the firecrackers set off nearby that danger was at hand.

The incident happened in the southern state of Karnataka, home to India’s largest elephant population with more than 6,000 jumbos, 20 percent of India’s elephant total. The 48-year-old left behind a wife and two children.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/84393

Darshan renews his pledge to care for an elephant and a tiger


Challenging Star Dashan, who is the brand ambassador of the Karnataka
Forest Department, has renewed the adoption of an elephant and a tiger,
for a period of one year, by paying Rs 2.75 lakh. The Mysore Zoo allows
individuals to adopt animals, the price of which is used for the upkeep of
the animal(s). Darshan is one of many celebs who has pledged to care for
animals at the zoo. Darshan was in Mysuru on Sunday with his son
Vineesh to celebrate International Tiger Day.

Executive Director of the Mysuru Zoo, Ajit M Kulkarni, says, “This is the
fifth time that Darshan has renewed the adoption of a tiger and an
elephant. We welcome his decision to continue with the renewal, which
will inspire others to adopt animals.” Darshan sponsors a tiger called
Vineesh, who has been named after his son, and an elephant called Madesh.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/entertainment/kannada/movies/news/darshan-renews-his-pledge-to-care-for-an-elephant-and-a-tiger/articleshow/65213308.cms

'Won’t use spikes to drive jumbos to forest'l


The Karnataka government on Wednesday told the Supreme Court that spikes would no longer
be used to drive away elephants straying into human habitat.

The Centre, also informed the top court, that instructions had been issued to all the principal
chief conservators of forest (PCCFs) concerned to desist from using any method that tortures
the elephants.

A bench of Justices Madan B Lokur and Deepak Gupta ordered stay on the tenders issued by
West Bengal, Jharkhand and Odisha to obtain spikes for the purpose.

Advocate Anitha Shenoy, appearing for the Karnataka government, said she had instructions
that all spikes obtained through tenders would be discarded. Henceforth, spikes or any such
method would not be used to drive away elephants.

“We direct that any existing tender will remain stayed,” the bench said. “Wherever spikes or
fireballs are used for driving away elephants, remedial steps should be taken by the states
concerned for removing the spikes and desisting from using fireballs,” the bench said.

The court was hearing a petition by conservationist Prerna Singh Bindra and others on checking
elephant deaths, curbing human-animal conflict and maintaining elephant corridors across India.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.deccanherald.com/won-t-use-spikes-drive-jumbos-685021.html

Injured female elephant found dead at Tholampalayam


COIMBATORE: The injured five-year-old female elephant, which had been spotted near Periyanaickenpalayam a few days ago, was found dead at Tholampalayam on Wednesday.

“The elephant could have died on Tuesday night. It was found in the postmortem that two of the elephant’s teeth were broken. It might have struggled to take food,” said district forest officer D Venkatesh.

Forest officials had been tracking the elephant, whose carcass was found deep inside reserve forest, for about a week.

“We started monitoring the animal after we got information that the elephant had been standing frequently near a waterhole in Thadagam reserve forest. As we noticed its lower jaw had been dislocated, we brought a veterinarian to inspect the animal. Based on his suggestion, we were giving the elephant medicine-laced bananas,” said Venkatesh.

Earlier in the week, a ten-year-old male elephant was found dead near Burgur forest area near Anthiyur in Erode.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/coimbatore/injured-female-elephant-found-dead-at-tholampalayam/articleshow/65235997.cms

Boy trampled to death by wild elephant in Odisha


Rourkela, Aug 2 (PTI) A 10-year-old boy was trampled to death by a wild elephant at a village in Odisha’s Sundargarh district, a forest official said.

The incident happened at Amurudi village under the jurisdiction of K Balang police station late last night when the boy was sleeping in his house and the jumbo barged in after pulling down the mud wall, he said.

The deceased, identified as Biswanath Munda, came face to face with the pachyderm which trampled him, while his mother and younger brother managed to escape, Divisional Forest Officer (DFO), Rourkela, Sanjay Swain, said.

The elephant had stormed the village after getting separated from a herd of about seven jumbos and the incident occurred when the villagers were trying to drive it away, the official said.

The DFO said that the family has been given Rs 20,000 immediately and another Rs 3.8 lakh will be provided after completion of necessary formalities.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.india.com/news/agencies/boy-trampled-to-death-by-wild-elephant-in-odisha-3201200/

Saturday, August 04, 2018

Herd of wild jumbos stray into human habitat in Assam’s Numaligarh



Sensation prevailed at a tea estate near Numaligarh in Assam as man-elephant conflict reared its ugly head again.

People made frantic efforts to drive away an elephant herd that had taken shelter inside the vicinity of the Letekujan tea estate. Few elephants retaliated at the humans who got too close by chasing them off.

The herd of jumbos remained within the tea estate during the day and raided the nearby villages at night.

Several parts of Numaligarh and eastern Assam continue to face the menace of elephants.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://northeastlivetv.org/2018/07/24/herd-of-wild-jumbos-stray-into-human-habitat-in-assams-numaligarh/

Monday, July 30, 2018

Wild Elephant Attacks People at Tea Plantation in India

Wild animals are dangerous enough when we are just talking about dogs or big cats. But what about beasts that are even bigger?

Only a miracle can help one escape this raging pachyderm.

A wild elephant was filmed charging on a huge tea plantation in India.

The elephant's handler who was working there tried to keep the uninvited guest away from his tamed animal, but it wasn't very easy.

His friend had to risk life and limb, distracting the creature's attention in order to help rescue the tame elephant.

Luckily, the aggressive intruder stumbled and fell, allowing the man to run away.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://english.alahednews.com.lb/44044/553#.W15nA9Uzbcc

Trains to slow down while passing through Rajaji Tiger Reserve

Rishikesh, Jul 14 (PTI) Trains along the 18-km Haridwar-Rishikesh-Dehradun rail route that goes through the heart of Rajaji Tiger Reserve (RTR) will have to lower their speed for the safety of wild animals.

Trains passing through the section, which is notoriously called the “killer track” with 25 elephants knocked down by speeding trains along the line in the last 25 years, will have to lower their speed to 40 kmph during daytime and 35 kmph from 6 in the evening to 6 am, RTR Director Sanatan Sonkar said.

The decision was taken at a meeting between the head of the state forest force Jairaj and Additional Divisional Railway Manager Moradabad Sharad Kumar, Sonkar said.

The rail track passes through Haridwar, Motichur and Kansrau ranges of RTR, he said.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.india.com/news/agencies/trains-to-slow-down-while-passing-through-rajaji-tiger-reserve-3166623/

Elephants population in Bengal rises from 590 to 682 in four years

The elephant population in the Bengal has increased from 590 in 2014 to 682, the recent elephant census by the State Forest Department has revealed.

The numbers reflect the elephants inhabiting both north and south Bengal.The elephants were counted by direct count method and for the first time south Bengal was also included.

Another census is also being done using the dung decay, which according state's chief wildlife warden, is a more accurate way of determining the elephant population and may reveal a bigger population as many elephants may not be sighted in thick forests. Dung decay method takes into account dung density, decay rate and defecation rate to calculate the number of elephants inhabiting an area. This method was first used in Buxa forests in BengalThe chief wildlife warden pointed out that little decrease in the numbers wasn't a matter of concern, as elephants were always on the move. At least 100 elephants were always moving from one place to another, he informed. From north Bengal they could move to Assam, and even cross the border and inhabit the jungles of Bhutan and Nepal for some time. Similarly from south Bengal, they could move to Odisha and Jharkhand, he said. The State Forest Department tracks the movement of the elephants on daily basis with the help of locals, who inform the forest officials about the elephant sightings through WhatsApp and other messaging services. Continuous monitoring of the elephant movement enables forest officials to get an idea of range-wise presence of elephants and inform locals of possible elephant attacks on villages.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://news.webindia123.com/news/Articles/India/20180715/3389570.html

Elephant found dead

A female wild elephant aged three years was found dead in a well at Kaithapara in the Thodupuzha range of the Kothamangalam forest divisionn on Sunday. The well had no protective wall. A nearby house was found damaged by the wild elephants.

The residents of the house were away in Ernakulam for medical treatment. It is suspected that two elephants intruded into the area and the female elephant accidentally fell into the well.

A post-mortem examination would be conducted on Monday, said Kothamangalam Divisional Forest Officer Unnikrishnan who reached the spot.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/kerala/elephant-found-dead/article24428004.ece

Sunday, July 29, 2018

Man-elephant conflict takes a serious turn in Assam’s Numaligarh



Man-elephant conflict took a serious turn in Assam’s Numaligarh this morning.

A huge herd of elephants was pitted against hundreds of people as both sides indulged in a face off at Sundarpur Safela near Numaligarh. The huge elephant herd tried to cross over through the farmlands into areas of human settlements, but on the other side large number of people stood to drive away the jumbos from causing any damage.

The situation remained tense as both sides tried to stand up against each other in such adverse situation. Sometimes the elephants managed to reach close to settlements, and at other times it were the people who had the upper hand in fending off the pachyderms.

At last, the forest department reached at the place and fired shots in the air that managed to drive away the elephants.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://northeastlivetv.org/2018/06/30/man-elephant-conflict-takes-a-serious-turn-in-assams-numaligarh/

Man-elephant conflict in Assam: Jumbo herd raid villages near Kaziranga; Wild jumbo blocks National Highway in Nagaon

Man-elephant conflict continues to be a cause of concern in Assam. Elephants have come out of the confines of the Kaziranga National Park due to excessive flooding and food shortage in the park areas.

This has led to unrest among the villages near the park’s periphery as the pack of jumbos have started targeting these villages for food while raiding human settlements and farmlands. The failure of the forest department to provide any solution to the matter has infuriated the people, leading to protest in front of the DFO’s office.

Earlier this morning, a wild elephant blocked a National Highway causing traffic to stall on both sides of the road. The incident happened near Rengbeng at Kothiatoli in Nagaon district where an elephant strolled on the road causing panic among the local people.

Traffic was stalled on the road for a long time before the jumbo was finally driven off by the local people with help from forest department officials. The elephant have been causing havoc in the area since few days now and have even attacked human settlements and farmlands.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://northeastlivetv.org/2018/07/04/man-elephant-conflict-in-assam-jumbo-herd-raid-villages-near-kaziranga-wild-jumbo-blocks-national-highway-in-nagaon/

Assam: Wild elephants go on rampage in Baksa villages

A herd of wild elephants went on a rampage and left behind a trail of destruction at Nagrijuli area in Baksa district of Assam on Wednesday night. The wild tuskers created terror at several villages falling under the Nagrijuli Development Block in the said district.

It is reported that elephant habitats are shrinking along the Indo-Bhutan border due to continuous human encroachment thus forcing them to come out of their natural habitats in search of food and, in the process, triggering conflict with the locals.

The said group of wild elephants entered Nagrijuli Tea Estate on Wednesday night and sat along the bank of Bornadi River. In search of food, the marauding tuskers entered Line No 6 and 8 of Nagrijuli Tea Estate and crushed the houses of Birshi Munda, Apurba Dundi, Amrit Bagh, Albish and Dilkumar. Another herd of wild pachyderms entered the nearby Dongargao village and smashed the houses of Uttam Biswas and Gudum Munda and broke the shops of Santosh Rai and Boistav Rai.

The marauding tuskers ate whatever food was left inside the houses and the shops and caused huge loss of property. The helpless villagers tried their best to chase away the wild elephants, but in vain. The villagers as well as the labourers of Nagrijuli Tea Estate stayed awake the whole night till the group of wild elephants left for the jungles at dawn.

The villagers have demanded that the State Government and the concerned authorities should take necessary steps to stop human-elephant conflict but, wildlife activists say that human encroachment in the forests of Northeast India have forced elephants out of their habitats thus triggering the said situation. Elephants rampage through villages in search of food as their habitats are being overtaken by people, say conservationists.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://nenow.in/north-east-news/assam-wild-elephants-go-rampage-baksa-villages.html

Human-Elephant Conflict in Wokha district on rise



Wokha, July 12 (MExN): As per report received from the District Forest Officer (DFO) Wokha, Zuthunglo Patton IFS, Human-Elephant Conflict in Wokha district is on the rise and increasing year by year.

According to a DIPR report, as per the nationwide Synchronized Elephant Population Estimation 2017 Report by India’s Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change, Nagaland has an elephant population of 446 and elephant density/km² of 0.45 which is the second highest density/km² after Karnataka.

Due to increasing reports of incidences of Human-Elephant Conflict, a joint assessment was carried out in April 2018 by the District Level Committee for assessment of the loss of human life, domestic animals, crops and properties by wild animals for compensation in the District.

The assessment showed that this year alone, 165 families belonging to eight villages of New Changsu, Ekhoyan, Old and New Riphyim, Wokha village, New Wokha, Seleku and Koio were badly affected by the presence of elephants in these areas and fields, the report informed.

The crops or property damaged were paddy, banana, pineapple, orange, sugarcane, vegetables, yongchak, betel nut, rubber, papaya, jackfruit, granary, farm huts, piggery, poultry, etc. amounting to more than Rs. 17 (Seventeen) lakh which could only be partially reimbursed by the wildlife wing of the Forest Department this year.

The most recent reports of Human-Elephant Conflict in the month of June and July 2018 is from the villages of Old Riphyim, New Riphyim, Old Changsu and Mungya affecting 97 farmers and the GMS building at Mungya which have been verified by the Department, it added. The crops and property damaged included paddy fields, vegetables, banana, farm huts, rubber, etc.

The report stated that with an ever-increasing human population leading to increasing fragmentation of habitat for the elephants, incidences of human injury or deaths, crop raids, poaching/hunting of elephants will only increase.

Wokha District has a total geographical of only 1628 sq. km and supports a staggering 150-180 number of elephants all over the district. It not only indicates a bleak future for the farmers and rubber cultivators but also for the survival of these heritage animals in Wokha unless these issues are seriously addressed, it added.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://morungexpress.com/human-elephant-conflict-in-wokha-district-on-rise/

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Elephant kills two in tea garden in Alipurduar



Alipurduar (WB), Jun 23 An elephant trampled to death two persons at Gaerkata tea garden at Dhupguri in Alipurduar district, the police said today.

The incident happened when a herd of elephants was going to Marahat forest through the tea garden and one pachyderm killed a man and a woman yesterday.

As others raised an alarm and many people rushed to the spot, the elephants hurriedly entered the forest.

While the man was identified as a tea garden worker, the identity of the woman yet to be ascertained, the police said.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/elephant-kills-two-in-tea-garden-in-alipurduar/1335922

Elephant attacks van in Mangaluru, 7 injured



Seven persons were injured after an elephant attacked their vehicle on a state highway in Dakshina Kannada district early Saturday, the police said. The jumbo ran towards the vehicle and attacked it with its trunk. The incident was reported from Bilinele on the Uppinangady-Subramanya highway. The condition of one of the injured is stated to be critical.


 Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://indianmoney.com/news/elephant-attacks-van-in-mangaluru--7-injured-1529821926

Tuskers’ fight cause of elephant death, hunt on for ‘killer’


BIJNOR: A day after a decomposed carcass of an seven-year-old male elephant was discovered from Rajgarh elephant reserve in Bijnor's Najibabad forest division, its post-mortem conducted by experts from Wildlife Institute of India, Lucknow and Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly revealed that it sustained wounds in a fight with another tusker and bled profusely.

A hunt is now on to find the other tusker to prevent similar incidents. Rajgarh is connected with both Rajaji and Corbett National Parks in neighbouring Uttarakhand.

Najibabad’s divisional forest officer Udayveer Singh said, “The young elephant was attacked by a mature elephant having sharp tusks while the dead elephant’s tusks were small and blunt.”

According to official sources, post-mortem report said the dead elephant’s bone above its tail was found fractured and there were injury marks caused by another elephant’s tusks on its body.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/meerut/tuskers-fight-cause-of-elephant-death-hunt-on-for-killer/articleshow/64724344.cms






Assam: Wild elephants go on rampage in Baksa villages



A herd of wild elephants went on a rampage and left behind a trail of destruction at Nagrijuli area in Baksa district of Assam on Wednesday night. The wild tuskers created terror at several villages falling under the Nagrijuli Development Block in the said district.

It is reported that elephant habitats are shrinking along the Indo-Bhutan border due to continuous human encroachment thus forcing them to come out of their natural habitats in search of food and, in the process, triggering conflict with the locals.

The said group of wild elephants entered Nagrijuli Tea Estate on Wednesday night and sat along the bank of Bornadi River. In search of food, the marauding tuskers entered Line No 6 and 8 of Nagrijuli Tea Estate and crushed the houses of Birshi Munda, Apurba Dundi, Amrit Bagh, Albish and Dilkumar. Another herd of wild pachyderms entered the nearby Dongargao village and smashed the houses of Uttam Biswas and Gudum Munda and broke the shops of Santosh Rai and Boistav Rai.

The marauding tuskers ate whatever food was left inside the houses and the shops and caused huge loss of property. The helpless villagers tried their best to chase away the wild elephants, but in vain. The villagers as well as the labourers of Nagrijuli Tea Estate stayed awake the whole night till the group of wild elephants left for the jungles at dawn.

The villagers have demanded that the State Government and the concerned authorities should take necessary steps to stop human-elephant conflict but, wildlife activists say that human encroachment in the forests of Northeast India have forced elephants out of their habitats thus triggering the said situation. Elephants rampage through villages in search of food as their habitats are being overtaken by people, say conservationists.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://nenow.in/north-east-news/assam-wild-elephants-go-rampage-baksa-villages.html







Close shave for passengers as female elephant attacks KSRTC bus near Bandipur

In a shocking incident, a female elephant attacked a KSRTC bus, in which 60 passengers were travelling. The elephant came raging towards the bus and rammed its tusks inside. The KSRTC bus driver honked repeatedly to scare the tusker away. The female elephant panicked and walked away into the forests. All 60 passengers miraculously escaped without any injuries.
Haridwar: A 35-year-old female elephant was run over by a sp ..


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.msn.com/en-ae/video/viral/close-shave-for-passengers-as-female-elephant-attacks-ksrtc-bus-near-bandipur/vp-AAz9bCd

Another jumbo dies on track


Elephants’ death on the railway tracks continuing, another died on Haridwar-Dehradun tracks near Motichur forest range just four kms ahead of Raiwala junction on Tuesday, the fourth such death over the past one and half year. It is learnt that female elephant aged around 34 years was mowed down by speeding Kathgodam Express around midnight. The forest officers claimed that they had warned the loco pilot of the jumbo movement around the tracks and asked him to bring down the speed of the train sufficiently, a warning which the loco pilot refused to heed. However, the wild life lovers rejected such claims, saying that it was nothing but the long-continuing pass the buck game.

It is further learnt that a team of doctors was rushed to the spot where the jumbo was lying injured immediately after the incident, but it succumbed around 5 am.

Quizzed over continuation of such on the track deaths of the elephants, the principal chief conservator of forests, Uttarakhand, Jai Raj termed the death very unfortunate. “We are all deeply sad and an emergency meeting has been called on Wednesday where the officers of Wildlife Institute of India would be present. We would discuss things threadbare and a strategy would be chalked out to stop recurrence of such unfortunate deaths. We would find out whether forest patrolling is continuing and whether there is a breach in our , coordination with the railway officials,” he said.


To read the full article, click on the story title.



Gentle giants suffer for tourists in Goa



Montora, a docile Indian elephant, enters the small, muddy brown lake. She rolls about, letting the water slide on her back. Her mahout shouts out to her in Bengali. His tone is sharp, commanding. She stops moving. Two young women enter the water and mount her back. The mahout stands in front of the elephant and gives sharp commands. Montora scoops water in her trunk and on command, lets it out on the women. They squeal in delight. Onlookers, mostly tourists from Russia and the United Kingdom, laugh and take pictures. Montora repeats the “power shower” several times on command.

Montora’s toenails are black, cracked and split with fissures. One nail is missing. There is heavy pink pigmentation on her trunk and ears and a small wound on her left ear. Her eyes are misty, with a continuous discharge. She wears a chain around her neck with a bell on it. She is 46 years old, docile and well mannered. Local staff say she works approximately 12 hours a day and on a “good day”, at least a 100 people visit.


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Snubbing ivory art won’t save elephants, says British Museum chief



The British Museum has accepted the donation of hundreds of ivory antiques, arguing that refusal “would not save an elephant’s life today”.

Hartwig Fischer, the museum’s director, defended the decision to accept more than 500 Chinese ivories collected about a century ago by Sir Victor Sassoon, a businessman.

Mr Fischer said that the objects were “artefacts of high cultural value that need to be preserved, not destroyed”.

“You can think of many cultures in India, China, Europe, Byzantium where ivory has played an important role to shape belief and social practices and yet we would never buy modern ivory,” he said. “That is totally out of the question.”



To read the full article, click on the story title.



Four held with elephant ivory in West Bengal



Four held with elephant ivory in Jalpaiguri, West Bengal. Officers of Belakoba forest range seized elephant ivory and arrested four persons including a civil engineer on June 24. The plan was to smuggle the elephants ivory to Nepal.


 Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.hindustantimes.com/videos/india-news/four-held-with-elephant-ivory-in-west-bengal/video-BYmezG6jkjiRkXI8WxEsAO.html

Safety glow on jumbo corridors



Jamshedpur: Several stret-ches of Chakradharpur railway division that are part of or close to migratory corridors of elephants will have watchtowers and solar lights to prevent fatal accidents.

Spokesperson for South Eastern Railway's Chakradharpur division Bhaskar said they would soon convene a meeting with the state forest authorities to chalk out details.

"We have identified some vulnerable points along Sini-Chakradharpur, Posaita-Manoharpur and Chaibasa-Barbil, and near Jharsuguda (in Odisha). Elephant deaths have recently taken place in Posaita and Jharsuguda. We plan to set up watchtowers and illuminate jumbo corridor intersections with solar lights to check animal casualties," he told this newspaper.

As many as 18 elephant deaths have been reported on tracks in Chakradharpur division alone in the past 12 years.

On April 16, a freight train hurtling down Bagdihi forest range in Jharsuguda on Jharkhand-Odisha border had barreled into a herd of elephants, killing a calf and three adults.

Experts said the train was traveling at 75 miles an hour (around 120kmph) in a protected stretch of forest. Concerned, the railway authorities quickly imposed a speed limit of 40kmph on all trains on the route.

A senior official at Garden Reach, the headquarters of South Eastern Railway (SER) in Calcutta, said it had also been made mandatory to blow long whistles while passing through vulnerable stretches.

"We have urged for better co-ordination with forest depa-rtment of respective states to pr-event elephant deaths on tra-cks," said Sanjay Ghosh, chief public relations officer, SER.




Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/jharkhand/safety-glow-on-jumbo-corridors-240208

Female elephant run over by train while crossing tracks in Uttarakhand



A female elephant was found dead in the Rajaji Tiger Reserve in Uttarakhand on Tuesday after being run over by a train, a forest official said.

Officials told IANS that a group of 17 elephants was crossing the rail tracks when the high-speed Dehradun-Kathgodam Express was passing by.

While foresters tried to alert the driver, he did not slow down the train, resulting in the death of the elephant.

Drivers of trains are expected to slow down while passing through the national park. But elephants continue to be hit and killed by trains.

The management of the forest reserve said a case will be filed against the train driver.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/female-elephant-run-over-by-train-while-crossing-tracks-in-uttarakhand/story-Z6TFeIpZCGCWRW9B06mfxH.html

Elephants not scared of crackers


Keonjhar: Fire crackers no longer scare elephants in the district because of their excessive use by forest personnel to drive away the animals straying into human habitations.

The Champua forest range is badly hit by straying wild elephants into villages and farmlands.

The elephants intrude into village almost around the year which is why keeping them at bay remains a continuous task for the forest department, said Champua forest range officer Ghanashyam Barik.

The department has pressed into service 50 personnel in the elephant chase squad.

Additionally, 150 honorary volunteers, comprising local people, assist them in the operations. The bursting of crackers to disperse the animals is an effective and time-tested method.

Besides, the elephant squad beats drums and tin cans to drive back the elephants into the forest.

Lately, cracker-bursting has not been yielding the desired result because these intelligent animals are no more scared of the noise.

The animals have got accustomed to the loud sounds and are not scared of it any more, said a forest official.

Besides, the release of funds for procuring crackers is erratic.

The high-decibel crackers used for elephant chasing are locally made. The department is yet to pay the outstanding credit to the local cracker traders, said the forest official.

Three herds with 32 elephants in total are now inside villages and crop areas in the Champua forest range, which is largely a plain area with rich cover of dense forest.

The area is also marked by vast reserve of crop fields and orchards. As traversing through the plain area is less strenuous, elephants from Telkoi, Sadar, Ghatagaon, Joda and Barbil forest areas frequent Champua.

Mining operations, besides shortage of fodder in the natural forests, is the main cause for elephants venturing into human habitations.

The shortage happens primarily due to large scale felling of trees for timber, forest fires, rampant harvesting of fruits in summer and cutting off fodder creepers such as Siali, the forest official said.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/elephants-not-scared-of-crackers-240501https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/elephants-not-scared-of-crackers-240501




‘DMK leader’ arrested for trying to sell ivory



In a covert operation in Krishnagiri and Dharmapuri districts of Tamil Nadu, the Mahalakshmi Layout police on Wednesday busted an ivory smuggling racket and arrested a gang of five men led by Khader Basha, who is believed to be a functionary of the DMK party. The six men are suspected of poaching elephants and other wildlife in Tamil Nadu and selling products, like tusks, in Karnataka. The police seized 12 tusks from the gang.

Acting on a tip-off, a police team posed as prospective clients and approached Naveen and Prakash who were in Bengaluru to sell elephant tusks. When the duo agreed to sell four tusks, they were promptly arrested with the poached goods.

On questioning them, the police learned that they were part of a larger gang that operated out of Krishnagiri district. “We learned that the leader of the gang was Khader Basha from Anchetty,” said the police.

On Wednesday, a special team led by Inspector B.N. Lohith went to Basha’s house in Anchetty. However, local residents tried to prevent his arrest. “Basha rallied DMK party workers in his hometown and tried to resist arrest by organising a mob,” said an officer who was part of the team.

The angry mob surrounded the police team and threatened to attack them if they did not release Basha. The team had to seek the help of their Tamil Nadu counterparts who rushed to the spot and dispersed the agitated mob.

Another team raided the houses of three of his associates — Javed, Shabarinath and Satish Kumar — in Dharmapuri district. They recovered four tusks sawed in half.

Basha and the other three accused were brought to Bengaluru and booked under various sections of the Indian Penal Code and also under the Wildlife Protection Act.

“Our initial probe has revealed that Basha is the kingpin of the racket. He ran a gang that would poach animals in the forests of Krishnagiri and Hosur districts,” said a senior police officer. The police are investigating if the gang has a place to illegally store wildlife products meant for sale in the black market.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/dmk-leader-arrested-for-trying-to-sell-ivory/article24281167.ece

Avoiding Brutality : Kerala Sends 3 Elephants To Tamil Nadu Training Camp



In a masked admission to brutal ways being the only known taming technique known to us, the forest department has lorried three of its elephants to a “kumki” or training unit in Tamil Nadu.

The big beasts will reach Mudumalai Elephant camp.

Kerala has the densest domestic elephant population in the country but the latest brief deportation is based on “lack of expertise”.

Here even the most reputed elephant handlers use clubbing, battering and excessive tortures to subdue the massive beast.

In contrast at Maudumalai, skilled tribals use ancient techniques handed down from times when elephants were revered as supernatural beings.

There are 599 documented elephants and over 100 undocumented elephants in the state. They are used for temple processions or heavy-duty logging. In either cases they are kept in open violation of rules meant to ensure elephant safety and prevention of cruelty. While TB is the biggest killer among state elephants, death from wounds kept raw deliberately gets reported on and off.


 Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://twentyfournews.com/e/2018/06/29/avoiding-brutality-kerala-sends-elephants-tamil-nadu-training-camp/




Dhalbhum foresters to build water bodies on jumbo corridor



JAMSHEDPUR: The forest department will augment water bodies this year to ensure herds of elephants on the dedicated corridor between Jharkhand and West Bengal do not descend to the foothills in search of water


Coming in the backdrop of three elephant-related casualties in the last two months in the foothill areas of Dhalbhum subdivision, the department said it will construct two check dams this year and four next year. "The two check dams will be constructed in the Ghatshila side (Chekam and Narsingpur) in the next few months," said Dhalbhum divisional forest officer (DFO) Saba Alam Ansari.

The department is scouting for the site for the construction of the other four check-dams in the Charchakka forest in Ghatshila which is part of the corridor used by elephants to travel between Dalma and West Midnapore in West Bengal. "We have more than 25 water natural and artificial sources of water on the corridor, but we have decided to increase the number of the man-made water bodies as part of the project," Ansari said.

Every year, elephants destroy crops in the villages located on the edge of the corridor spread across Jharkhand, Bengal and Odisha. "Existing water bodies on the corridor have sufficient water level for the elephants," Ansari said, adding that nearly 70% of the existing water bodies has water available round the year. "We have also improved the approach paths leading to the natural and artificial water bodies," Ansari said.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/jamshedpur/dhalbhum-foresters-to-build-water-bodies-on-jumbo-corridor/articleshow/64790795.cms




5 Elephants Circled Thai Man On Motorcycle, Trampled Him To Death



Bangkok:

A Thai man was trampled to death by five wild elephants near a rubber plantation Friday, police said, the latest deadly encounter in a country where pachyderms are both venerated and feared.

Masaree Samae, 40, was killed in the early morning attack in southern Yala province, home to many of Thailand's sprawling rubber plantations.

"The victim was riding his motorbike on the way to tap rubber... and was circled by five elephants," police captain Sathit Woonchoom told AFP by phone.

"I conducted the autopsy with a doctor and found wounds on his back and head," Sathit said.

The officer said he heard elephants rustling in the bushes near when he arrived at the scene to investigate.

Thailand's wild elephant population has dwindled to about 2,700 from a peak of 100,000 in 1850, according to the Thai Elephant Conservation Centre.

Deforestation and habitat loss has brought them in closer contact with humans in recent decades, and they often clash with villagers -- sometimes killing them.

Villagers have also killed the elephants despite them being a protected species.

Elephants are also poached or domesticated for entertainment and tourism.

Thailand has come under fire for its notorious elephant tourism trade and the threatened animals are widely used in circus performances, to give rides, or in films and on TV.

In November last year a five-tonne elephant that has starred in feature films and commercials crushed its owner to death in Chiang Mai.

The animal was in musth -- a state of high aggression among males accompanied by a hormonal surge -- when the accident happened, zoo officials said.

Two wild elephants were killed earlier this year by a pineapple farm worker who set up an electric fence set up to kill the creatures.

He was charged with poaching but quickly released on bail.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/thailand-elephant-attack-5-elephants-circled-thailand-man-masaree-samae-on-motorcycle-trampled-him-t-1875403

Aroma of jackfruits attracts elephants



Rourkela: Bumper crop of jackfruit has become a cause of worry for the villagers in far-off areas of Sundargarh district as the aroma of the fruit is attracting elephants.

"This time, mango, tamarind and mahua production have been considerably low and only the jackfruit witnessed bumper harvest. You can see truckload of jackfruits hanging on every tree. Most of the fruits are in mature stage and some will ripe by the beginning of August. But, the bumper yield has been a curse for us because the aroma of the fruit is attracting elephants. We are worried and scared," said Jagannath Pradhan from Kokerma village.

Pradhan has to sell more than 30 large-sized ripe jackfruits at Jhirpani weekly haat. "If I fail to sell them I will leave those behind or give it for free to anyone at the end of the day. But I cannot take then back home as the smell will attract elephants to my house," he said.

The situation is same everywhere in the district, whether at Gurundia, or interior of Kutra,Talsara or Nuagaon or Jareikela. The smell of ripe jackfruit is attracting the elephants.

"Fortunately, the trees are mostly away from the houses and concentrated in a distant orchard or forest. But, this is a big concern for us as the animals come in a herd just 100 metres away," said Kuanrmunda forest range officer Raj Kishore Das.





To read the full article, click on the story title.

Jumbo attacks trigger panic



Silchar: Frequent attacks by a herd of wild elephants in different areas of Patharkandi in south Assam's Karimganj district in the last few days have triggered panic among the villagers.

Patharkandi is nearly 80km from here.

Villagers R. Goala and Antu Das, among others, said the houses of labourers Babul Kand and Kartik Kand were razed by the herd at Champabari village, around 95km from here, in the wee hours of Friday.

However, the two managed to flee to a safe place with their families when the attack took place.

Two more houses were damaged by the elephants on Saturday. The herd also destroyed crops in and around the village.

Uttam Rikiason, another villager, said though the elephants wreak havoc every year in different villages of Patharkandi, the forest department did not take any steps to curb the menace.

Rikiason said the herd had killed many goats and cows in different areas and demanded that the elephants be caught and sent to a wildlife sanctuary.

Sukhdeb Saha, a ranger of the Patharkandi forest range, told this correspondent over phone on Sunday morning that forest officials had visited the areas and assessed the damage caused by the herd.

He confirmed the destruction of houses and arable lands in the past two days and said compensation would be given to the affected families.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/north-east/jumbo-attacks-trigger-panic-241686





Male elephant found dead



Chittoor: A male elephant was found dead in a forest close to Netteri village in Bangarupalem mandal on Sunday night, according to T Chakrapani, Divisional Forest Officer (Chittoor). Speaking to the media here on Monday, the DFO said the villagers have found the dead tusker in a mango garden and informed the forest officials.



“After performing a post-mortem, it came to know that elephant died due to severe indigestion. No human fault was identified behind the death of the 25-year-old jumbo,” he stated.

Chakrapani has revealed that more than 34 elephants wandering in the Palamaner forest range in four herds. The DFO further said that forest staff are making serious efforts to restrict the movement of the elephants by digging the trenches around the forest boundaries.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.thehansindia.com/posts/index/Andhra-Pradesh/2018-07-03/Male-elephant-found-dead/394685

Villagers demand relocation relief



Baripada/Angul: Local people on Tuesday stalled the shifting of two trained elephants from the Similipal Tiger Reserve (STR) to Satkosia in Angul.

On the other hand, members of 27 families, who have been left out from the compensation package for relocation from Raigoda village located in the core area of the Satkosia tiger reserve lodged their protest.

The local people obstructed the shifting of elephants, alleging that the animals were not trained to monitor tigers.

The elephants to be shifted to Satkosia are Mahendra and Rajkumar of 56 and 15 years old, respectively.

Wildlife activist Bhanumitra Acharya said: "Mahendra is too old, while Rajkuamar is too young to be engaged in monitoring tigers in Satkosia. Further they are not trained for such jobs. Moreover, who will do their job in their absence?"

"So far I know these elephants were brought from Karnataka. But it is best known to the authorities why they are shifting them instead of procuring more elephants from Karnataka," said Acharya.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/villagers-demand-relocation-reliefrow-over-shift-of-jumbos-242184?ref=odisha-new-stry

Elephant delivers on design strategy and packaging for Nestle's first ever breakfast range in India



With a firm equity in milk, chocolates, snacks & beverages, launching a healthy breakfast range seems like the obvious next move. Nestle did just that with the launch of their first ever breakfast range NesPlus in India. Nestle partnered with Elephant for design strategy & packaging for this move.

“Indians have some very peculiar breakfast habits & preferences. What sets this range apart is the fact that it remains crunchy even inside milk. Since the cereals shelves are dominated with multinational & national brands already, this exercise was about creating new category codes while keeping Nestle equity enhanced” says Ashwini Deshpande, Co-founder, Director, Elephant.

Design team at Elephant decided to bring out the multi sensorial consumption experience by using a combination of custom illustrations with product photographs in their full glory. A clean hierarchy with rays connoting the morning mood and colours mirroring the flavours, the range has been designed with flexibility to add more formats & variants.


 Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://brandequity.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/advertising/elephant-delivers-on-design-strategy-and-packaging-for-nestles-first-ever-breakfast-range-in-india/64852695

Assam: Wild elephants go on rampage in Baksa villages



A herd of wild elephants went on a rampage and left behind a trail of destruction at Nagrijuli area in Baksa district of Assam on Wednesday night. The wild tuskers created terror at several villages falling under the Nagrijuli Development Block in the said district.

It is reported that elephant habitats are shrinking along the Indo-Bhutan border due to continuous human encroachment thus forcing them to come out of their natural habitats in search of food and, in the process, triggering conflict with the locals.

The said group of wild elephants entered Nagrijuli Tea Estate on Wednesday night and sat along the bank of Bornadi River. In search of food, the marauding tuskers entered Line No 6 and 8 of Nagrijuli Tea Estate and crushed the houses of Birshi Munda, Apurba Dundi, Amrit Bagh, Albish and Dilkumar. Another herd of wild pachyderms entered the nearby Dongargao village and smashed the houses of Uttam Biswas and Gudum Munda and broke the shops of Santosh Rai and Boistav Rai.

The marauding tuskers ate whatever food was left inside the houses and the shops and caused huge loss of property. The helpless villagers tried their best to chase away the wild elephants, but in vain. The villagers as well as the labourers of Nagrijuli Tea Estate stayed awake the whole night till the group of wild elephants left for the jungles at dawn.

The villagers have demanded that the State Government and the concerned authorities should take necessary steps to stop human-elephant conflict but, wildlife activists say that human encroachment in the forests of Northeast India have forced elephants out of their habitats thus triggering the said situation. Elephants rampage through villages in search of food as their habitats are being overtaken by people, say conservationists.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://nenow.in/north-east-news/assam-wild-elephants-go-rampage-baksa-villages.html




Sunday, July 08, 2018

Ministers consider ban on hippo and mammoth ivory



Hippos, walruses and narwhals could be protected by a ban on the sale of items made from their tusks (writes Ben Webster). The government announced yesterday that it was considering extending the proposed ban on elephant ivory to cover other species, including sperm whales, killer whales and warthogs. It could cover the tusks of mammoths, which are similar to elephant ivory.

Ministers believe that their continued sale could fuel demand and lead to more elephants being poached. There are fears that the clampdown on elephant ivory has increased trade in ivory from other species, particulary hippos, which have declined by 12 per cent to about 100,000 in the past decade.


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Speeding train kills elephant in Rajaji Tiger Reserve


A female elephant was killed after being run over by a speeding train in Rajaji Tiger Reserve on Tuesday, a forest official said.
The 35-year-old elephant was part of a group of 17 elephants crossing rail tracks parallel to NH-58 in Himalayan colony at 12:05 am on Tuesday when the high-speed Dehradun-Kathgodam Express was passing by, the official said.
While forest staff tried to alert the train driver, he did not slow down the train, resulting in the death of the elephant.
The death comes despite claims of preventive measures being taken by the Rajaji Tiger Reserve authority and railways.
Park patrolling teams were on duty near the accident site and manually signalled the train driver to stop.
Park employee Roshanlal said they tried to aware the loco pilot by showing torch light as there were more than a dozen elephants in human habitat area, trying to cross the railway track.
Rajaji Tiger Reserve director Sanatan Sonkar said it was a shocking incident for which both the park management and railways has been working jointly to curb such incidents.
“We are investigating this matter and if found guilty, we will file case against the train driver and are also taking steps to lessen such accidents by putting up censors and camera traps,” he added.
Another park official, on condition of anonymity, said many times train drivers don’t follow the minimum speed limit and take precautions.


To read the full article, click on the story title.

Train kills elephant in Uttarakhand


Dehradun, June 26 : A female elephant was found dead in the Rajaji Tiger Reserve in Uttarakhand on Tuesday after being run over by a train, a forest official said. Officials told IANS that a group of 17 elephants was crossing the rail tracks when the high-speed Dehradun-Kathgodam Express was passing by.

While foresters tried to alert the driver, he did not slow down the train, resulting in the death of the elephant.

Drivers of trains are expected to slow down while passing through the national park. But elephants continue to be hit and killed by trains.

The management of the forest reserve said a case will be filed against the train driver.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.newkerala.com/news/read/14220/train-kills-elephant-in-uttarakhand.html

Jumbo herd wreaks havoc in Assam’s Udalguri district; elephant menace prevails in Numaligarh region



Conflict between man and elephant seems to be a never ending story in Assam. The regions of Harisinga and Paneri in Udalguri district is seeing pianic spread among the local people over the increased presence of wild elephants in the area.

A large herd of elephants has damaged human habitations and crops. Large number of elephants have been roaming in broad daylight. The lackadaisical attitude of the forest department has forced the local people to take certain measures to drive off elephants from their villages and farmlands.

Apart from Udalguri, elephant menace is also being witnessed in Assam’s Sundarpur region near Numaligarh where packs of jumbos have being raiding at human settlements and destroying crops.

People are spending sleepeless while fearing for their lives and properties due to the jumbo menace. Man-elephant conflict has become an almost regular affair in the region around Numaligarh.


 Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://northeastlivetv.org/2018/06/27/jumbo-herd-wreaks-havoc-in-assams-udalguri-district-elephant-menace-prevails-in-numaligarh-region/

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Minor dies in Elephant Attack in Sambalpur

Sambalpur: A five-year-old girl who was sleeping inside her home was killed after an elephant herd went on rampage in Basupali village under Katarbaga police limits of the district, here in the wee hours of Thursday. The girl’s younger sister and parents were also left injured.

According to reports, the family was sleeping inside their brick house when an elephant smashed down the room they were sleeping. The minor identified as Gitanjali Munda was killed as the wall collapsed on her.

The girl’s parents Raj Kumar Munda and Mukta Munda along with their 3-year old daughter were left injured and later shifted to Sambalpur District Headquarters hospital.

As per reports, an elephant herd comprising more than 15-members camping in Rengali forest range had entered the village last night and damaged at least 10 houses.

Meanwhile, the panicked villagers have demanded that the forest officials take immediate steps to drive away the jumbo herd.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://kalingatv.com/latestnews/minor-dies-in-elephant-attack-in-sambalpur/

Assam mulls roadmap to curb conflict with elephants



GUWAHATI: Confronted with the growing incidence of human-elephant conflict in the state and constrained by manpower crunch, the Assam forest department will soon constitute public coordination groups in a joint effort to create a roadmap to mitigate the problem in the affected areas.

“To start with, five groups will be formed at Nonaikhuti, Rajagarh, Paneri, Santipur and Udalguri for better coordination between villagers and the forest department,” MK Sarma, divisional forest officer of Dhansiri forest division, Udalguri, told The Shillong Times on Tuesday.

Three persons have been trampled to death and one injured in the past two months in Udalguri district under Bodoland Territorial Council even as encroachment by humans and subsequent loss of habitat and corridor blocks have compounded the problem.

“A district-level coordination committee meeting will be held this week where the gaon burahs (village headmen) and people having knowledge on the ground realities would be invited to take part. Suggestions and opinions would be taken into account in order to find out what needs to be done and subsequently create a roadmap to mitigate this conflict,” Sarma said.

The conflict has taken a serious turn in Goalpara forest division as well where at least 50 migratory elephants from Garo Hills are present. A couple of days back, two persons were reportedly trampled to death by a solitary elephant.

Obstruction of pathways (corridors) has rendered wild elephants directionless thereby triggering the conflict in the state’s reserved forests.


To read the full article, click on the story title

1 killed, 1 critical in jumbo attack in Dhenkanal



Dhenkanal: Adding to the spate in the cases of elephant attack in the state, wild pachyderms killed one person and left another critical in separate incidents under Hindol Forest Range in Dhenkanal district last night.

In the first instance, an elderly man identified as Prasanna Behera was trampled to death in Tentulisingha village under Kamakhyanagar police limits in the district. Behera was returning to his home last night while a tusker which had sneaked into the village in search of food pounced on him. He died on the spot.

In a similar incident in Kalinga village under Hindol Tehsil, another elderly man was badly injured in the attack of a wild tusker. Identified as Suresh Chandra Pal, the victim was on his way to farmland when the jumbo lifted him with its trunk and threw to a distance.

Pal has been admitted to a nearby hospital and his condition is stated to be critical.

A report of elephant incursion has also been received from Bankitia village under Rasol Tehsil in the district where a wild tusker overturned a tractor and spread panic in the area for hours this morning.

Forest officials have been rushed to the places where elephant attacks have taken place and taking stock of the situation.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://kalingatv.com/latestnews/1-killed-1-critical-in-jumbo-attack-in-dhenkanal/

Jumbo herd kills man in Chakulia



Jamshedpur: An elephant herd trampled to death a 60-year-old man near Bandih village under Kadaduba panchayat in East Singhbhum's Chakulia forest range, around 70 km from here, on Friday morning.

The victim, Shyamchandra Pal, had ventured into a nearby jungle when he came too close to the herd that had crossed over to Chakulia from adjoining Ghatshila forest range.

Chakulia range officer Gorakh Ram said the incident took place between 4.30am and 5.30am. "Pal and a few villagers from Bandih had gone to chase away the elephants but he came face-to-face with the herd and was tramped to death. A villager was also injured in the attack," he added. Pal's body has been sent to Ghatshila Sadar hospital for autopsy.

The range officer said around a dozen elephants had crossed Kharaswati river, which flows between Chakulia and Ghatshila range, on Thursday night. "We have formed two separate teams to drive away the jumbos from the jungle near Bandih village. But is it very difficult as they tend to come back again. But we are doing our best," he said.

The forest department handed over Rs 25,000 to the widow of the deceased for performing his last rites and Rs 3.75 lakh more would be given as compensation after paper works are completed. The forest department gives Rs 4 lakh compensation to victims of elephant attacks.

Ghatshila range officer Sushil Verma said separate herds of around 40 elephants were scattered in the jungles and some crossed over to Chakulia on Thursday night. "The herds were anchored at Makuli and Dayamani jungles till Thursday. Then they moved towards Chakulia," he said and added some of the elephants were still stationed in Ghatshila range.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/jharkhand/jumbo-herd-kills-man-in-chakulia-238007




Elephants from Kerala begin training at Mudumalai



Three captive elephants from the Muthanga wildlife sanctuary in Kerala began their three-month training to become kumki elephants, at the Theppakadu elephant camp in the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve on Friday.

The elephants, named Suryan, Neelakandan, and Surendran, will be trained to become kumkis or trained elephants that can be used for operations to trap wild elephants and help mitigate human-animal conflicts.

The animals will first be trained to obey basic commands, and subsequently to carry out complex tasks.

The Kerala Forest Department had sought the help of its Tamil Nadu counterpart to help train the animals. The Theppakadu elephant camp was chosen on account of the expertise of its staff in training kumkis.

The training was inaugurated by Deputy Director of the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (core and buffer areas), Shenbaga Priya, along with the Conservator of Forest Wildlife (Palakkad District) B. Anjan Kumar.

Officials said that there was great cooperation between the Kerala and Tamil Nadu Forest Departments, with kumki elephants from the Theppakadu camp being used in the past for operations in Kerala. They added that the Nilgiris’ border with Kerala had a high incidence of human-animal conflict, and the Forest Departments of both states would need to work together to help mitigate such conflicts.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/elephants-from-kerala-begin-training-at-mudumalai/article24176226.ece

Wild elephant kills farmer on Ooty border



Ooty: The man-elephant conflict surfaced yet again on the Nilgiris border when a wild elephant attacked and killed a farmer in Gudalur limits near here.

While the Gudalur and Pandalur limits in Nilgiris border has been witnessing an upsurge in the movement of stray wild animals into human settlements and a rise in man-elephant conflict in recent times, on Friday it took an ugly turn when the wild elephant which strayed into Vachakolli hamlet in the Pandanthurai area in Gudalur taluk attacked and killed Radhakrishnan (40), a farmer and resident of Vachakolli.

Sources said that Radhakrishnan was on his way to his fields on Friday morning.

A wild elephant which appeared from the nearby bushes attacked him. He succumbed to his injuries on the spot.

Villagers who gathered at the spot held a stir and wanted action from the Forest department to chalk out strategies to keep wild elephants from sneaking into the village limits.

The people also demanded an action plan for better protective measures in the village limits to tackle the man-elephant conflict.

Forest officials held talks with the villagers and promised to do their best to tackle man-animal conflicts.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/current-affairs/160618/wild-elephant-kills-farmer-on-ooty-border.html

Elderly woman killed by wild elephant in C'garh


A septuagenarian woman was trampled to death by a wild elephant in Korba district of Chhattisgarh this morning, police said.

The victim, identified as Nevarthin Bai (78), was attacked by the pachyderm when she had gone to collect forest produce from the forest adjacent to her village Sakdukala in Kartala forest range, a forest official said.


"She spotted the pachyderm in the forest, after which she tried to escape. However, the elephant chased and attacked her, in which she died on the spot," he said.

The local villagers spotted her body and informed the police and forest officials, following which they rushed to the spot, he said.

The woman's body has been sent for the post-mortem, he said adding that a case has been registered in this connection.

"The kin of the deceased were given an instant relief amount of Rs 25,000 by the forest department, while the remaining compensation amount of Rs 3.75 lakh will be disbursed after completing all the formalities in this connection," the official said.

With this incident, so far three people, including two women, have been killed in elephant attacks at separate places in the district, the official said.

Forest personnel have been directed to keep an eye on the movement of elephants in the area to avoid human-jumbo conflicts and drive them away from the human habitations, he added.

The thick forested northern Chhattisgarh, comprising Surguja, Surajpur, Korba, Raigarh, Jashpur, Balrampur and Korea districts, are notorious for human-elephant conflict.

The region has witnessed killings of several tribals and widespread damages to houses and crops by rogue elephants in the past few years.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/elderly-woman-killed-by-wild-elephant-in-c-garh-118061600338_1.html



Elderly woman trampled by elephant in Korba district



RAIPUR: An elderly woman was trampled to death in tusker attack on Saturday morning when she was out to collect forest produce in Korba district. This is third death due to man-elephant conflict in the region within a week.

78-year-old Nevarthin Bai from village Sakdukla had gone to the forest to collect forest produce early on Saturday when she came across a wild elephant. The tuskers in the region have been behaving aggressively immediately as they come in contact with humans and chase them.

Having no refuge, the woman ran for life on seeing the wild elephant but she couldn't run much far. She was rolled over by the elephant in its trunk and was thrown on the ground with a strong impact. The pachyderm then trampled her till she died.

Locals didn't dare to come for the rescue and once the animal left, they rushed towards her only to find her dead. Her mutilated body was sent for post-mortem by forest officials.

Forest department had been warning people against going into the forest in presence of elephants and expresses incompetency to deal with the issue without co-operation of public.

It was early this week when another elderly woman was trampled to death by elephant when she went to forest to relieve herself in Kartala. Last Saturday a man was attacked in forest too. 60-year-old Ghusiaram Rathiya had gone to collect mahua fruits when an elephant trampled him to death.


To read the full article, click on the story title

Elderly man crushed to death by elephants in Sambalpur



Sambalpur: In yet another elephant-human conflict, a 72-year-old man was killed in elephant attack at Baham village under Jujumura block of Sambalpur district on Sunday.

The deceased was identified as Biranchi Panda of the same village.

According to sources, the incident took place in the wee hours today when the deceased had gone to the nearby forest to collect mangoes. Biranchi and two others of the village confronted two elephants in the forest. while two others managed to escape from the spot, Biranchi failed. The wild jumbos attacked him and crushed to death.

His other two aids rushed to the village and informed the matter, following which villagers rushed to the jungle where they found Biranchi dead. A tusker and a female elephant ventured into the deep forest seeing the gathering of the villagers.

Locals informed the incident to local police and forest department. On being informed forest officials and police rushed to the spot. The police sent the body for post-mortem after preliminary investigation.

The forest department announced an ex-gratia of Rs four lakh to the victim’s family and the local sarpanch paid Rs 2, 000 under Harischandra Yojana of Odisha Government for last rites of the deceased.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://pragativadi.com/elderly-man-crushed-to-death-by-elephants-in-sambalpur/

President offered recommendations on conserving Sinharaja elephants



Protect Sri Lanka (Surakimu Sri Lanka) Organization has produced a list of proposals to the President Maithripala Sirisena on the recent developments regarding the 2 rare elephants in the Sinharaja Forest.

In the letter, they have appreciated the President’s decision to halt the removal of the said 2 elephants from their habitat.

Mentioning the importance of the 2 elephants, they say rather than providing just simple or emotional solutions to the human- elephant conflict, special attention should be given to sustainably resolve this issue.

The organization, in their letter, has listed out the following recommendations and proposals regarding the issues.


1. Preparing a proper management plan with a localized conservation plan by also considering the protection of the public and their property.

2. Establishing a committee consisting of relevant officials, scientific and technical experts, environmentalists and agents of community organizations of the area, to sustainably resolve the issue.

3. Use of tracking devices on the elephants to monitor their migratory patterns and to track their locations in order to regulate their entry to the areas of cultivation and human populace.

4. Establishing electric fences surrounding the villages which are threatened by the human-elephant conflict, instead of building electric fences around the forest.

5. Establishment of wildlife offices in the villages where the human-elephant conflicts are the most intense.

6. Setting up elephant passes according to the dietary and biological needs of the 2 elephants and limiting human activities near those elephant passes.

7. Removal of illegally cultivated land and strengthening the program regarding the buffer zone of the Sinharaja world heritage site.

8. Instructing police to strictly enforce the law regarding illegal gem mining, moonshine brewery, ‘wallapatta’ smuggling and deforestation in the Sinharaja forest.

9. Launching community conservation programs by educating the public living near Sinharaja world heritage site, on its importance.

10. Seeking the support of both local environmental organization as well international organizations such as the IUCN, UNESCO and Conservation International, with the conservation of the Sinharaja world heritage site.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://www.adaderana.lk/news/48186/president-offered-recommendations-on-conserving-sinharaja-elephants

Wild elephant kills young tribal in Tripura



Agartala: A wild elephant crushed a tribal youth to death on the spot in the deep jungles of Tripura, a northeastern Indian state.

Braja Sadhan Jamatia, 25, was crushed to death on June 20 morning at Hatipara near Maharani under Udaipur subdivision.

Jamtia had gone to the jungles in Hatipara to collect wood and wild herbals for consumption. Suddenly an elephant prowling in the area lifted him with its trunk and threw him down on the ground before smashing him to death with his foot.

This incident has triggered panic among villagers living near Hatipara as they fear rampaging herd of elephants. Sources in the forest department said that despite a drastic depletion in numbers the few elephants moving in herds pose a major menace to lives and properties.

“There are times when the elephant herds descend to the paddy fields and consume large quantities of paddy and other horticultural products besides destroying thatched and mud houses but this is the first killing after many years,” said a senior official of forest department from Udaipur.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://mattersindia.com/2018/06/wild-elephant-kills-young-tribal-in-tripura/

Odisha man quarrels with father, kills 4-year-old son in fit of anger



Jharsuguda: In a shocking incident, a man fought his own father and vented his anger on his four-year-old son causing his death in Bhursimal village under Laikera police limits of the district yesterday.

The deceased minor boy has been identified as Subham Nayak.

According to reports, Subham’s father Dinesh Nayak had gone to Bhursimal village yesterday evening to take him to their house. However, Dinesh, who works as a driver, had a minor fight with his father after the latter denied to take Subham as it was getting dark. However, on a fit of anger, Dinesh, who was under the influence of alcohol, pushed his father and kicked and slapped Subham causing both of them severely injured.

Subham and his grandfather were rushed to Jharsuguda district headquarter hospital soon after the incident. However, the boy succumbed to injuries this morning.

Laikera police started a probe into the incident and launched a manhunt to trace Dinesh, who absconded soon after the incident.

The deceased minor was staying with his grandparents for the last nine months, said sources.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://kalingatv.com/latestnews/odisha-man-quarrels-with-father-kills-4-year-old-son-in-fit-of-anger/

Wild elephant kills two motorcyclists in Naula



Two motorcyclists were killed by a wild elephant on Wednesday night at Lihinipitiya in Naula.

Police identified the victims as 29-year-old Nalaka Ruwan, a father of two and 30-year-old Sumudu Kamal Bandara, a father of one. They were known to be childhood friends from Lihinipitiya.


Residents in the area said several people had been killed by wild elephants in the past and that though wildlife officers were informed about the threats they faced, nothing had been done to resolve the human-elephant conflict. They requested for protection at least till the funeral rites were performed.
Officials of the Naula Divisional Secretariat who rushed to the scene promised to provide police protection and with the help of wildlife officials to move the wild elephants from the area.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
http://content.mirrorcitizen.dailymirror.lk/2018/06/22/Wild-elephant-kills-two-motorcyclists-in-Naula/

Jumbos run amok



Keonjhar: The wild elephants have destroyed over a dozen of houses and trampling croplands at villages in the Champua forest range jurisdiction.

The herd, which had strayed into the villages, are from the Similipal Tiger Reserve in Mayurbhanj district. The elephants had migrated to the villages a fortnight ago. However, they had been driven away to their habitat. But, they reappeared again on Wednesday evening, said forest officials.

Though the jumbos have caused damaged to property and farm lands, so far no human casualty or injury has been reported.

The villages affected by elephant depredation are Banika, Katulikana, Tunutuna near the dense forest areas in Champua range.

The animals led their habitation corridor of Similipal Tiger Reserve and traversed through over 100km of hilly terrains and dense forest to stray into the reserve forest. The villages, where the elephants have strayed, are home to about 6,000 residents.

Skilled service group of elephant chasers are keeping round-the-clock watch on the animals. The GPS-tracking teams have spotted the jumbos' movements near the villages. They are on the job to chase them from there.

"As the location of elephants has been tracked, we are hopeful of blocking the animals' movement route to the villages and drive them away," the official said.

Odisha, which houses 70 per cent of total elephant population in east India, has been witnessing deteriorating human-elephant conflict with jumbo depredation spreading to 26 out of 30 districts of the state. The wild animals wander villages searching for food due to shrinking habitats.

Elephant attack

A five-year-old girl, who was sleeping at home, was killed after an elephant herd went on rampage at Basupali village in Katarbaga police limits of Sambalpur on Thursday.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/states/odisha/jumbos-run-amok-239415




Elephant kills two in tea garden in Alipurduar


An elephant trampled to death two persons at Gaerkata tea garden at Dhupguri in Alipurduar district, the police said today.

The incident happened when a herd of elephants was going to Marahat forest through the tea garden and one pachyderm killed a man and a woman yesterday.


As others raised an alarm and many people rushed to the spot, the elephants hurriedly entered the forest.

While the man was identified as a tea garden worker, the identity of the woman yet to be ascertained, the police said.


Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/elephant-kills-two-in-tea-garden-in-alipurduar-118062300404_1.html

As elephants kill in Assam, blame on ‘Laden’



Around 3.30 am on June 1, at village Patpara Pahartoli, adjacent to a forest area in Assam’s Goalpara district, Manoj Hajong (25) and his brother Bidyadhar Hajong (28) were woken up by shouts that there was an elephant outside their hut.

The Hajong brothers rushed outside to see a lone elephant, about 9 feet in height and without a tusk, walking away after eating the rice crop kept in the verandah of the hut.

Manoj, a driver by profession, sprinted behind the elephant to chase it away, Bidyadhar on his toes. At the same time, three young neighbours of the Hajongs — armed with sticks which held lit jute twines — ran towards the elephant from the other side.

Trapped, the furious elephant turned, let out a cry and sprang towards Manoj. It threw Manoj to the ground, crushed him and went off towards the forest. Bidyadhar ran out of its way.

“I saw Manoj die… what could I do? It was ‘Laden’. Had I tried to do anything which offended the giant, I would not have been alive today. We call it ‘Laden’ because people get paralysed with fear when they see him attacking,” says Bidyadhar, who is a farmer.

The elephant he is talking about is around the same age, and Goalpara district’s only loner elephant. Over two years and the 300 sq km of forest area he is rumoured to operate in, ‘Laden’ is accused of killing several people and damaging huts. Villagers in the affected areas do not know much about Osama bin Laden or al-Qaeda. What they do know is that ‘Laden’ stands for “someone who scares”.

Since 2016, Goalpara district officials have attributed 20-25 deaths to elephant trampling. This year, they have listed eight. Every other day in the past few weeks, ‘Laden’ has hit the headlines in the local press for his “atrocities”.

But several forest and district administration officials as well as experts say it is unlikey ‘Laden’ is responsible for all he is accused of. “No doubt this elephant has killed people, but so have elephants in herds. He is targeted by public because his atrocities are prominent,” says Goalpara Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) A Goswami.


 To read the full article, click on the story title

TB infected elephants not to be used for tourist rides in Amer Fort: Rajasthan govt



New Delhi: The Rajasthan government on Thursday directed the Department of Archaeology and Museums to segregate, quarantine and ensure that the ten elephants found to be suffering from tuberculosis are not used as rides for Amer Fort.

The move by comes after a plea from animal rights groups including the Humane Rights Society International/India (HSI India) and People for Animals for the contagious elephants to be quarantined.

"We welcome the news of infected elephants being quarantined and not being used at rides. However, segregation is not enough," said N G Jayasimha, managing director HSI India, in a statement to PTI. He added that there need to be better living conditions for elephants so that the spread of diseases can be contained.

On June 1, a court had directed the Jaipur police department to investigate instances of cruelty against elephants used to provide joy rides at the Amer Fort and submit a report before it.

According to an examination conducted by the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) during December 2017 to March 2018 at Hathi Gaon, ten elephants were found to be suffering from tuberculosis.

Animal rights activists had asked the Union Health Ministry on June 18 to quarantine elephants infected with tuberculosis in Jaipur's Amer Fort and screen all the untested animals which are "forced" to give rides to tourists, as the disease can spread from animals to humans.


To read the full article, click on the story title

Two rare elephants confined to Sinharaja



A recent attempt to relocate two rare elephants from the Sinharaja Forest Reserve created a controversy within environmentalists as the UNESCO would de-list the area as a world heritage site. This led to the intervention of the President who issued a directive that the move to relocate the elephants should be suspended until a proper scientific study was done on whether this transmigration would lead to the extinction of this rare species.


The UNESCO in 1978 designated the Sinharaja Forest Reserve as a biosphere reserve and a world heritage site.

SINHARAJA FOREST RESERVE
Sinharaja is a national park and a biodiversity hotspot in Sri Lanka and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has identified it as the last vestige of primary tropical rain forest with more than 60 per cent of the trees are endemic or rare.


This hilly virgin rain forest is only 21kms (13mi) from East to West and a maximum of 7kms (13mi) from North to South, but it is a unique area of endemic species including trees, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Wildlife is not seen easily because of the dense vegetation as in the dry-zone national parks like Yala. According to Wikipedia, there were three elephants and 15 leopards, and the common mammal is the endemic purple-faced Langur. One elephant cannot be accounted for at present.


There are 26 endemic birds in Sri Lanka, of which 20 rain forest species occur in Sinharaja. Reptiles include endemic green pit viper, hump-nosed vipers and also rare variety of amphibians, especially tree frogs. There are also invertebrates like common bird wing, butterfly and leeches.


To read the full article, click on the story title