Monday, February 11, 2019

Tamil Nadu: Fans of friendly wild elephant protest state move to capture, train him


In Tamil Nadu’s Coimbatore region, which has witnessed several protests over the past decade against incidents of wild animals, including elephants, straying out of forests and attacking humans and properties, a latest decision of the state forest department has invited protests yet again. This time, however, the protest is against the capture of a wild elephant, Chinna Thambi, who the protesters say is a human-friendly elephant. They have also formed a fan club, Chinna Thambi Fans Association.

After efforts by the forest department to capture and release the elephant to deep forest area failed and the elephant returned, state Forest Minister Dindigul C Sreenivasan Saturday announced that Chinna Thambi will be captured and trained as a kumki — tamed elephants used to capture wild elephants and for wildlife safari.

While Srinivasan said his department is left with no option as the priority is to protect people and agricultural fields, 45-odd people staged a protest in Coimbatore against the move.

The decision to capture the elephant was taken after forest department’s attempt to send him away from Thadagam near Coimbatore to Varakaliyar near Topslip a week ago failed. He was spotted again Friday near a village in Pollachi, about 50 km from Coimbatore.

While the department fears a human-animal conflict, local residents don’t consider Chinna Thambi a menace. Besides forming the fan club, they have started using a hashtag, #SaveChinnaThambi, with music videos featuring him and posted selfies with Chinna Thambi in the background on the social media.

A senior forest official said Chinna Thambi, who is being tracked through a radio collar, has strayed into Udumalpet forest range and that his movement is being closely watched by anti-poaching teams. “We have relocated some people from Pollachi village and brought kumki Kaleem to the spot. After bringing one more kumki, Chinna Thambi is expected to be captured in a few days,” said a forest official.

While Chinna Thambi has raided crops and there have been instances of him damaging house windows and shop shutters for fruits and grains inside, his relatively non-violent nature has made him dear to people. But the forest official said his nature can change anytime and failed translocation efforts show Chinna Thambi is a “conflict animal”.

B Ramakrishnan, who co-authored Right of Passage, which traces elephants for a decade or more to see their behaviour and migratory paths, said Chinna Thambi cannot be let loose if it refuses to return to the forest. “Relocation or taming may be solutions. He is around 25 years old. We cannot predict for how long he would remain friendly,” said Ramakrishnan.

Another human-friendly wild elephant, Rivaldo, lives in the nearby Mudumalai Tiger Reserve. Rivaldo would often wait for people to feed him as he lost a part of his trunk in an accident. Ramakrishnan, however, said the cases of Chinna Thambi and Rivaldo are very different. “Rivaldo lives in a tiger reserve where the human livelihood is more accommodative. While tribals there co-exist with animals, eco-tourism industry too has a healthy way of dealing with wildlife. But Udumalpet forest range is more populated and urban. It has more agricultural land and chances of conflicts may be high,” Ramakrishnan said.

On the other hand, ‘Elephant’ Rajendran, a senior lawyer known for many PILs surrounding elephants and forests, said Chinna Thambi shouldn’t be captured as the idea of Kumki is against wildlife. Rajendran said he will be filing a writ petition in Madras High Court Monday against the government’s move.

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Sunday, February 10, 2019

2 elephants found dead on same day


Coimbatore: Hours after forest department officials recovered the carcass of a seven-year-old male elephant from a contour canal in Udumalpet forest range on Friday, an eight year old male elephant was found dead in the canal a short distance away.

Farmers, who noticed the carcass of the elephant in the canal at Vallakondapuram in the Udumalpet range had informed the officials around 6.30am. A team led by forest ranger Dhanabalan rushed to the spot and retrieved it. “With the help of a veterinarian, postmortem was conducted near the canal and the carcass was buried in a nearby area. The cause of death is yet to be ascertained. We believe it died at some other place,” Dhanabalan said.

The official received another phone call around 4pm about the carcass of another male elephant in the canal. A team of officials reached the spot and conducted postmortem. The carcass was later buried inside the forest. tnn

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Saturday, February 09, 2019

Kerala moots jumbo corridor linking forests, sanctuaries


THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: With incidents of man-animal conflict being
widely reported in Kerala, the state has embarked on an ambitious project
to link its forests and sanctuaries to create a continuous path for the free
movement of elephants.

The project that intends to create a continuous corridor from north end to
the south will be undertaken using the funds given by the ministry of
environment, forest and climate change (MoEFCC). Government has
submitted the proposal to the Centre for linking seven corridors in
northern districts, in which four will require land acquisition. For the first
phase, seven corridors — identified by the ‘right of passage (elephant
passages of India)’ report 2017 by wildlife trust of India and MoEFCC —
have been shortlisted.

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Human-elephant conflict kills 1,713 people, 373 pachyderms in 3 years


Electrocution is a leading cause of elephant deaths; factors, including habitat disturbance, cause for rise in conflict, Minister tells Parliament
In the three years between 2015-2018, human-elephant conflict caused 1,713 human and 373 elephant deaths by unnatural causes, including electrocution and poaching. Experts say various factors, including habitat disturbance and urbanisation, could be the cause of the alarming rise in unnatural human and animal casualties.

Highest numbers
In a response to Parliament, Dr. Mahesh Sharma, Minister of State in the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFF), said damage to houses and crops had been reported in several States. Data presented by him showed that the highest numbers of human casualties had occurred in West Bengal (307 deaths), followed closely by Odisha (305).

In 2018 alone, Dr. Sharma said, 227 people were killed by wild elephants in 16 States, with Assam reporting the highest number (86).

Electrocution of elephants is a particular cause for concern in managing India’s elephant population. Deaths caused by electrocution stood at 226, contributing to 60.6% of deaths since 2015, according to the data. In comparison, elephant deaths by all other causes, including train accidents, poaching and poisoning, added up to 147.

The data showed that the mean number of elephant deaths per year would be 56.6 — a worrying statistic.

While the data provides information on the causes of the deaths, it does not mention the States with the highest number of elephant-related deaths, thus eliminating the possibility of looking at case-specific details.

Human deaths
The fragmented landscape in West Bengal makes it difficult to prevent elephant or human deaths, said N. Kalaivanan, veterinarian and elephant expert.

Ajay Desai, consultant, World Wildlife Fund-India (WWF) explained that human-elephant conflict in West Bengal dates back three decades. “In the 1980s, elephants in the Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary would be confined to the Dalma hills, as food and water was available for them. When cultivation of paddy began in the plains near the hills, elephants began moving downwards to raid crops. Villagers chased them away and elephants began moving all the way to the southern portion of West Bengal,” he said. Since elephants were not confined to a restricted environment, widespread conflict between humans and animals increased.

Elaborating on Odisha’s problem, Mr. Desai said that the growing number of mines would continue to be a problem for elephants there. “Elephants move from Odisha and Jharkhand to Chattisgarh. The Chhattisgarh population, however, is unaccustomed to the presence of elephants in their midst. This leads to many accidents,” he said.

Mr. Desai said that detailed post mortems of elephants is difficult as the bodies are decomposed at the time of examination in cases of death by electrocution. “Some deaths are caused by the presence of low hanging wires, others are retaliatory in nature. Situation analysis of each death must be done by the Forest Department to ascertain the cause of the death,” he said.

Localised solutions
Dr. Kalaivanan recommends localised solutions to elephant-related problems.

“Policy should be formed to provide solutions suited to the particular geography. Habitat degradation is a major cause of elephant deaths. While compact landscapes like ones in the Nilgiris provide little space for interaction between wild elephants and people, disturbed landscapes, like Thevaram in Tamil Nadu’s Theni district, are linear forests and hence lead to issues such as crop raiding and human deaths,” he said.

Mr. Desai also noted that degradation of habitat and a rise in elephant population in certain parts of the country are not discussed in detail. Recognising problems like deforestation is seminal to creating a solution, he said.

Dr. Sharma said that the Ministry has approved the construction of physical barriers such as barbed wire fences, solar powered electric fences, and bio-fencing using cactus and boundary walls, to prevent the entry of elephants into agricultural land. Dr. Kalaivanan suggests the stepping up of community participation in the protection of crop lands and elephants.

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Elephant calf falls into trench, rescued


Coimbatore, Feb 9 (PTI): An elephant calf fell into a trench in the Mettupalayam Forest Range on the outskirts of the city and was rescued, forest officials said Saturday.

Hearing the trumpeting, the officials went to the spot, pulled the one-year-old elephant out of the trench and re-united the animal with its herd after a three-hour-long rescue effort.

The calf was moving with the herd when it fell into the pit and couldn’t come out while the rest of the herd managed to, the officials said.

The trench was created on the fringes of a farmland bordering the forest area, they said.

PTI nvm

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.

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Male elephant found dead in Thirumoorthy reservoir


Tirupur: The carcass of a seven-year-old male elephant was found near Thirumoorthy reservoir in Tirupur district on Friday. It was found floating in the contour canal, which drains into the reservoir.

Forest department officials fished out the carcass from the canal. “We believe the elephant could have slipped into the canal while drinking water and sustained injuries on its head. The real cause of death could be ascertained only after investigation,” said a senior forest official.

A medical team conducted postmortem. The officials were taking steps to bury the carcass at the spot.

The discovery of the carcass has diverted the attention of the Udumalpet range forest personnel, who had been busy in the past few days monitoring crop-raiding elephant Chinna Thambi, which was roaming in Madathukulam area near Udumalpet

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Friday, February 08, 2019

Out of 75 elephant deaths last year, 48 died of electrocution: Govt


New Delhi, Feb 8 As many as 75 elephant deaths were reported in the country last year of which 48 died of electrocution, the government told the Lok Sabha Friday.

To a query raised in the lower house of Parliament on elephant deaths, the environment ministry said that 48 wild elephants lost their lives after being electrocuted and 13 died in train accidents till December 2018.

The number of elephant deaths in 2018 was lower compared to 2017 when 105 elephants died with 66 of them being electrocuted, the ministry said.

According to the government, five elephants were killed in poaching incidents in 2018, which was 10 in 2017.

A total of 75 elephants died in 2018, it said, adding a total of 373 elephants have died between 2015 and 2018.

Mahesh Sharma, Minster of State in the environment ministry told the Lok Sabha that inquiries have been conducted into death of wild elephants and FIRs have also been lodged.

The government also said that 227 people were killed by wild elephants in 16 states last year. Out of these 16 states, Assam had the maximum number of human deaths due to wild elephants at 86, followed by Odisha and West Bengal at 45.

The government said Rs 5.50 crore was spent as compensation for the loss of life in the 16 states till the end of 2018, with the highest amount being provided in Odisha which received Rs 2.94 crores.

The government data showed zero amount being given to Assam for human deaths.

The data also revealed that Rs 9.19 crore has been paid by the Centre as compensation for the loss of crop or damage to property due to elephants in the 16 states. AG NSD

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Elephant tramples man to death


Kochi, Feb 8 (UNI) A man was trampled to death and eight sustained minor injuries by an
elephant, which ran amok after hearing the sound of crackers from the nearby area, near
Guruvayur in Thrissur district on Friday.

The deceased was identified as Babu, a native of Kannur.

The injured were admitted at a private hospital at Kunnamkulam, police added.

UNI CGV JTS 2028

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TEENAGER CLINGS TO ELEPHANT’S TUSK AS RAMPAGES THROUGH INDIAN MARKET


Teenager clings to elephant’s TUSK as it picks her up and rampages through Indian market after it wrapped its trunk around her as she posed for a photo
  • Nichanat Manucham, 19, posed for a picture with an elephant in Surin, Thailand
  • The elephant wrapped its trunk around her, picked her up and went berserk
  • She was forced to hold on to its massive tusk while it trashed the market
  • Video footage shows her holding on for dear life as elephant tramples food stalls 
This is the dramatic moment a teenager is forced to cling on to an elephant’s tusk while it runs rampage through a local market in Thailand.

Nichanat Manucham, 19, was taking a picture with the elephant at a country fair in Surin, north east Thailand, when it started wrapping its trunk around her leg.

The elephant, named Phan Thong, then grabbed her body, hoisting her in the air, and began trampling the surrounding food stalls, likely agitated by the heat and loud noises.

Danger: Nichanat Manucham, 19, was posing for a photo with the beast when it suddenly picked her up and went on a rampage through the stalls

Miss Manucham managed to hold on to the elephant’s massive ivory tusks for almost two minutes as it went berserk.

Astonishing footage shot by a bystander shows how the bull went on a terrifying rampage with the girl clinging on for dear life.

India’s ‘granny’ elephant dies aged 88

Death of a hunter: Starving lioness loses battle with…

Terrified tourists speed away as an angry elephant runs out…

To read the full article, click on the story title.

SC may direct Mayawati to reimburse exchequer on crores her government spent to erect Elephant statues at parks


Between 2007 and 2012 Mayawati government had spent over Rs 2600 crores on construction of parks with statues of herself and her party symbol, the elephant

Already facing a probe by the Enforcement Directorate over alleged financial irregularities in the construction of parks and memorials commissioned during her stint as Uttar Pradesh chief minister, Mayawati could now be asked by the Supreme Court to reimburse the state exchequer of precious crores her government spent on erecting statues of herself and her party symbol, the elephant, across the state between 2007 and 2012.

While hearing a public interest litigation, on Friday (February 8), the Supreme Court’s bench of Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and Justices Deepak Gupta and Sanjiv Khanna said that it was of the “tentative view” that the Bahujan Samaj Party supremo “should reimburse the entire money to the public exchequer spent on these elephants and statues.” The bench asked Mayawati’s counsel to convey this view to his client and listed the matter for next hearing on April 2.

While it is unclear whether the court would ask Mayawati to be personally present in court for the proceedings or indeed order her to cough up the monies her government spent on construction of enormous, self-dedicated, memorials, the view expressed by the top court certainly comes as a major setback for the BSP chief ahead of the Lok Sabha polls.

Mayawati’s fourth stint as UP chief minister, between 2007 and 2012, had been widely criticized for the huge amounts of public money her government spent on building parks and memorials in Lucknow, Noida and other parts of the state which were all decked up with massive statues of Dalit icons, BSP founder Kanshi Ram, Mayawati and elephants.

Several petitions had, at the time, challenged the construction of these parks and the extensive use of elephant statues were touted as violation of election commission rules as many saw them as Mayawati’s move to etch her party’s poll symbol strongly into public memory. However, since the elephant statues were not an exact replica of her poll symbol, Mayawati had got reprieve from various courts and the poll panel on their construction. She had also stoutly defended her bizarre decision of getting her own statues installed at these parks while her opponents sought to mock her by claiming that, in Indian tradition, statues of only the deceased are erected.

The BSP’s rout in the 2012 assembly polls was largely attributed to the electorate’s agony against the huge wastage of public money on these memorials, seen as a self-aggrandizing agenda. While it was speculated at the time that the Samajwadi Party government which came to power after Mayawati’s defeat would demolish her statues, then chief minister Akhilesh Yadav had made it clear that he would let the statues stay since a huge amount of public money had already been spent on them.

With Mayawati and Akhilesh now joining hands to take on the common enemy, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his BJP, in the upcoming Lok Sabha polls, the two satraps from Uttar Pradesh are facing various probes for alleged irregularities that had occurred during their respective stints as chief minister.

In January, the Enforcement Directorate had raided half a dozen places in Lucknow in a bid to recover documents related to the construction of memorials by the Mayawati regime. The raids had come close on the heels on the CBI launching an inquiry into the role of Akhilesh Yadav in alleged illegal mining. Predictably, both Mayawati and Akhilesh had said that the raids were the result of political vendetta by the BJP.

The Enforcement Department has filed a criminal case under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act to investigate the alleged irregularities flagged by the state vigilance department in 2014 over construction of the memorials. The vigilance department complaint, prepared during the tenure of Akhilesh Yadav’s chief ministership, had claimed that Uttar Pradesh suffered losses of around Rs. 111 crore in the construction of Mayawati’s Dalit memorials between 2007 and 2012. As per one UP government estimate, the overall cost of building the memorials across the state was in the vicinity of a staggering Rs. 2,600 crore.

The UP Lokayukta had also indicted two cabinet colleagues of Mayawati – Nasmeedunin Siddiqui and Babu Singh Kushwaha – besides 12 of her party lawmakers for alleged “’wrong-doings”’ in the purchase of sandstone for the memorials.

With the Supreme Court now indicating that it may ask Mayawati to personally cough up the money her government spent on the memorials, the BSP supremo may well be staring at a major crisis as her party’s financial muscle is known to be on a steady decline since she lost power in 2012. Faced with a political adversary like the BJP which has earned millions in political donations over the past four and half years of its rule at the Centre, Mayawati knows she needs a robust treasury to help her party’s candidates fight the upcoming polls. However, if a large chuck of her party’s wealth has to be deposited with the BJP-led UP government’s coffers, her Lok Sabha battle may be significantly dented.

—India Legal Bureau

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Thursday, February 07, 2019

Animal rights body jumps to elephant’s defence


Chennai, Feb 7 (PTI) Days after the Madras High Court advised authorities not to put a roaming jumbo to any discomfort, an animal rights body Thursday urged the state government to keep ‘Chinnathambi’ in the tusker’s natural forest home.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) India also advised the government to adopt only humane and scientific methods to protect crops and villages or to translocate the animal to another forested area, if necessary.

PETA said compassionate methods such as planting chillies around farm perimeters can be adopted while dealing with human-elephant conflict, citing the example of farmers in Africa dealing with such problems.

The animal rights body also urged the government to incorporate adequate town planning as an anecdote to the increasing encounters between elephants and humans.

Some humane methods for managing human-elephant conflicts include restoring elephants’ habitats, strengthening anti-poaching efforts, and working with villages located in critical elephant corridors, PETA said in a statement.

“In Africa, farmers have successfully kept elephants away from crops by planting chillies around farm perimeters,” it said, adding the body has also written to the State forest department on this.

The court recently sought response from the principal conservator of forests by February 11 to a plea seeking a direction to prevent authorities from capturing, taming, tranquilising or harming ‘Chinnathambi’ which has been venturing into human habitats.

In an interim order, the court said the jumbo should not, in anyway, be put through any physical discomfort.

The 25-year-old jumbo fitted with a radio-collar was translocated from the outskirts of Coimbatore to Varagaliar by forest department personnel on January 25, but within days, it ventured into human habitations again.

It was translocated following complaints from residents about the elephant destroying crops and damaging houses for the last seven months.

PETA said it was relieved to read that the government did not plan to turn ‘Chinnathambi’ into a ‘kumki’ (tamed elephant) and urged authorities to adopt humane methods to protect crops.

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.

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Villagers seek protection from Chinna Thambi


TIRUPUR: Employees of the Amaravathi Co-operative Sugar Mills and
residents of Krishnapuram on Wednesday requested authorities to drive
wild elephant Chinna Thambi away from the residential area.

Labour Progressive Federation and Anna Tholizhalar Peravai sent
petitions to chief minister Edappadi K Palaniswami regarding the issue.

“For the last two years, the mill could not produce sugar due to drought.

Thanks to good rain, we were expecting good production in April. But the
presence of Chinna Thambi is affecting the atmosphere as employees and
the villagers fear that untoward incidents may happen,” secretary of LPF P
Mahalingam said. “The mill was taking steps in sugarcane seed
multiplication process in the farm, where the elephant is camping and
damaging crops.”

Meanwhile, animal husbandry minister K Radhakrishnan, who visited the area, said government is thinking about the steps to be taken deter Chinna Thambi

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PETA asks farmers to grow chilies to prevent elephants from entering fields


Chennai : People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) India has jumped to the aid of pachyderm Chinna Thambi asking the Tamil Nadu government to keep the elephant in its natural forest home. The animal rights body said the government should take only humane, scientific methods to protect crops and villages or to translocate him to another forested area, if necessary.Citing the example of how Africans save themselves from elephants, the animal rights body asked the government to ask the farmers to grow chillies along the perimeters of their agricultural fields. These would ensure elephants wont destroy crops, the Peta said.The Peta asked the government to issues guidelines regarding the adoption of effective, compassionate methods for dealing with human-elephant conflicts – including appropriate urban planning that protects or restores forestland – and advised that African farmers have successfully kept elephants away from crops by planting chilies (which can be harvested and sold) around farm perimeters.“Keeping elephants in captivity is inherently cruel, as they are forced to obey commands under threat of violence, fear, and pain,” says PETA India Emergency Response Assistant Neha Chaturvedi. “The natural habitat of Chinna Thambi and other elephants must be conserved and restored, and the state government should work with villages to protect crops by planting chilies and adopting other humane measures.”Last week the Madras High Court advised that Chinna Thambi not be subjected to any physical discomfort. It also expressed concern that earth movers are being used to lift tranquilized, captured elephants and that Chinna Thambi previously sustained injuries, including broken tusks, during his capture and failed translocation.

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Elephant shot dead in Kollegal, tusks missing


BENGALURU: The carcass of a wild elephant, shot dead 3km from an antipoaching camp in Kothanur forest, Kollegal taluk of Chamarajangar district, was found on Sunday with tusks missing.

It’s suspected the pachyderm had been killed around a fortnight earlier.

The forest range falls under the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary.

Forest department sources said the area didn’t have a range forest officer.

Hence, an officer from a neighbouring range was in charge. “It appears
miscreants used this to their advantage,” they said.

A forest official filed a police complaint. A hunt has been launched for
poachers. He suspected poachers may have taken away the tusks.

Environmentalists and wildlife lovers expressed shock over the incident. “It’s poaching. The elephant was shot in the head. The onus is on forest and police departments to arrest the culprits. With country-made guns easily available, poachers seem to be having a field day,” said an environmentalist.

Foresters suspect organised gang behind jumbo poaching Greens called for increased patrolling by foresters and better monitoring of the forest spread over Mandya, Chamarajanagar
and Ramanagara districts.

Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary DCF Ramesh said the incident may have taken place 10-15 days earlier.

“Poachers shot and killed the elephant and used acid to remove the tusks. Forest staff noticed the carcass on February 3 and I inspected the spot the next day. The tusker is about 25 years old. We suspect that an organised gang of poachers have killed the elephant. We’re investigating the incident,” he said.

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Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Dakshayani, oldest Asian elephant, dies


The 88-year-old pachyderm died after collapsing in her shelter

Kerala has bid adieu to its ‘Gaja Muthassi’ (grandmother of elephants), who was witness to generations grow up before her.

Eighty eight-year-old Chengalloor Dakshayani, the oldest living Asian elephant, died after collapsing in her shelter at Sathyan Nagar in Pappanamcode by around 3 p.m. on Tuesday.

The female elephant, under the possession of the Chengalloor Mahadeva Temple, was the oldest among all captive elephants managed by the Travancore Devaswom Board.

Owners

Dakshayani was initially owned by the royal family of erstwhile Travancore, which obtained the elephant when it was five from the Konni elephant camp. It was then donated to the Thiruvarattu Kavu at Attingal a year later, following which it was shifted to the Chengalloor Mahadeva Temple. The Forest department had officially pegged the elephant’s age at 76 on August 18, 2007.

The Devaswom Board had formally accorded the title of ‘Gaja Muthassi’ to the elephant with much fanfare in July 2016. A special postal cover was also released by the India Post to mark the occasion. Though subsequent efforts had been made to obtain the Guinness record for the oldest living elephant in captivity, they were futile.

No ailment

According to Devaswom veterinary surgeon T. Rajeev, who supervised the elephant’s health regime for around 10 years, Dakshayani suffered no significant ailment or lack of appetite during the last days. Nevertheless, during the last few months, her diet included pineapple and carrot to improve metabolism.

Reminiscing about the grand old elephant, Dr. Rajeev said handling her was not very difficult. Her nature endeared her to many people and many travelled long distances to catch a glimpse of the elephant. “Only the sight of a needle used for injection could create a sense of fear or hostility in her,” he said.

The elephant’s post-mortem will be held in the presence of Forest Department and Devaswom Board officials on Wednesday.

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Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Terrifying moment elephant charges at visitors in safari vehicle


This is the moment an angry elephant charges at visitors in a safari vehicle in a forest in South India.

While the visitors got more than what they bargained for, they managed to escape as the elephant stopped chasing the vehicle.

A forest official said the incident occurred at Kabini reserve forest in Karnataka on January 31.

“It was only a mock charge. The elephant never intended to harm the visitors, which it could have done easily if it wanted,” he said.

“Unfortunately local media is using this to whip up fear. Safaris are safe and our staff is trained to handle these situations,” he added.

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Terrified tourists speed away as an angry elephant runs out of trees and CHARGES at them on an Indian safari


This is the heart-stopping moment an angry elephant charges at tourists in a safari jeep and chases them.

Visitors got more than they bargained for when they were on a safari at Kabini reserve forest in Karnataka, south India.

The enormous elephant can be seen charging out of trees as the jeep passes along a dirt path.

It swerves onto the road and sprints to pursue the vehicle, making a loud trumpet as it storms behind them.

Tourists sitting in the back of the jeep can be seen watching the elephant seemingly terrified as it inches closer to their car.

But suddenly the elephant stops in its tracks and watches as the jeep accelerates away.

A forest official said the incident, which occurred on January 31, was not dangerous.

He said: 'It was only a mock charge. The elephant never intended to harm the visitors, which it could have done easily if it wanted.

'Unfortunately local media is using this to whip up fear. Safaris are safe and our staff is trained to handle these situations.'

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Monday, February 04, 2019

Wild tusker eats, drinks and makes merry


Tirupur: Ignoring the steps taken by the forest department to smoke him out of a farm at Madathukulam taluk here, wild elephant Chinna Thambi was found munching on a sugarcane on Monday.

The department is struggling to drive the elephant from the farm owned by Amaravathi Co-operative Society Sugar Mills to the Anamalai Tiger Reserve (ATR). It has deployed 80 forest staff, including 50 anti-poaching watchers, to monitor the tusker roundthe-clock.

“Chinna Thambi is doing fine despite being away from the forest. It is mingling with kumki elephants Khaleem and Mariappan brought from Topslip. The farm has plenty of sugarcane and water,” chief conservator of forests V Ganesan told TOI. “We took steps to drive it towards the forest area with the help of the kumki elephants. We thought that it would move along with the taming elephants as the three were sharing a cordial relationship. But, after following them for a short distance, Chinna Thambi returned to the sugarcane farm.”

Meanwhile, a medical team led by veterinarian Dr Manoharan reached the spot to take stock of the 25-year-old animal’s health.

The team, which observed the activities of the elephant, said it was doing fine.

Meanwhile, a forest official said it will not be easy to drive Chinna Thambi to ATR, which is 15km away, overnight. “We have decided to wait and watch for now.”

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Wild elephant shouldn’t be put to any discomfort: Madras HC tells forest dept


Chennai, Feb 4 (PTI) The Madras High Court on Monday sought response from Tamil Nadu’s principal conservator of forests by February 11 to a plea seeking a direction to prevent authorities from capturing, taming, tranquilising or harming a wild elephant which has been venturing into human habitats.

In an interim order, a division bench of Justice S Manikumar and Justice Subramonium Prasad said the jumbo should not, in anyway, be put through any physical discomfort.

The jumbo, nicknamed ‘Chinnathambi’ by locals, was translocated from the outskirts of Coimbatore to Varagaliar by forest department personnel on January 25.

The move followed complaints from residents about the elephant destroying crops and damaging houses for the last seven months.

The bench said, “The intention of the Tamil Nadu government appears that the elephant should live in its natural habitat…apprehension of the public is also to be taken note of.” Additional chief principal conservator of forests submitted it was not possible to just capture the jumbo and make it a ‘kumki’ (tamed elephant).

The bench, after passing the order, posted the matter to February 11 for filing the counter.

The petitioner sought the elephant’s translocation and rehabilitation by framing guidelines and systematically studying man-elephant conflict in areas surrounded by forests.

Also, the petitioner said, steps should be taken to mitigate the conflict through alternative methods focused on conserving wildlife.

To this, the advocate general, appearing on behalf of the government, submitted that elephant expert Ajay Desai and other forest officials had gone to the forest area to chase the elephant, which is now in Amaravathi area, back into the jungles.

The principal chief conservator, who appeared before the bench, said all elephants cannot be used as ‘kumkis’.

“We first planned first to send Chinnathambi into the Mudumalai forest area and there is no idea to make the elephant a ‘kumki’. Such a decision would be the last one (option) and we’re trying to send the elephant back into the forest,” he said.

The 25-year-old Chinnathambi was spotted near a railway station in nearby Tirupur district on Saturday.

In Coimbatore district, several environmentalists and animal lovers on Monday expressed concern over moves to tame Chinnathambi and make him a ‘kumki’ and urged the government to drop the purported plan.

The group also submitted a petition to the district collector.

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.

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Herd of wild elephants destroys several acres of paddy crops, tramples villager in Jharkhand


Jamshedpur: Adding to instances of wild animals clashing with locals in Jharkhand, a herd of four elephants critically endangered a villager while trespassing the Dhotiduba village. The Jumbos also destroyed paddy crop spanning across several acres of farmland under the Ghatshila police station area limits in the early hours of Sunday before trampling the man who is currently being treated for injuries incurred during the clash.

A group of as many as four elephants entered the village and caused damage to paddy crops which prompted locals to chase the herd with sticks. However, one of the locals who has now been identified as Satyaranjan, got too close to one of the jumbos as the herd moved towards the neighbouring Asma village which resulted in him getting

The animals were either scared or angry after being chased out of the Dhotiduba village with sticks which led to them attacking locals. After he was trampled by one of the jumbos, Satyaranjan was rescued by a fellow villager who took him to the Ghatshila sub-divisional hospital from where he was referred to the MGMMCH. The doctor who treated Satyaranjan told Times of India that his condition is critical.

District Forest Officer (DFO), Dalhbhum, Abhishek Kumar told media outlets that a trained team of wildlife officials has been dispatched to the incident site to inspect the corridoor and aid villagers in dealing with such incidents. Dhotiduba falls on the foothills of the Dalma-Bansdih-Kandadubih route which is a popular corridoor for elephants from Jharkhand crossing into West Bengal.

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Jumbo herd tramples villager, destroys crop


JAMSHEDPUR: An herd of four wild elephants critically injured a 26-yearold man and destroyed paddy crop in the Dhotiduba village of Ghatshila police station area early on Sunday.

The victim, Satyaranjan Das, along with six other villagers, was making a bid to chase away the herd but after reaching the neighbouring Asma village, Satyaranjan came close to one of the elephants. Apparently enraged for being chased with sticks, the jumbo trampled Satyaranjan. He suffered serious injuries on his head and left leg.

Other members of the group came to his rescue and took him to the Ghatshila sub-divisional hospital from where he was referred to MGMMCH.

According to Shankar Tudu, the doctor who treated Satyaranjan at the sub-divisional hospital, the victim's condition is critical.

The herd was moving towards neighbouring Bengal through the dedicated corridor on the Dalma-Bansdih-Kandadubih route but seemed to have lost the path and descended on the foothills.

The herd had already destroyed paddy crop spanning across several acres of farmland by the time the villagers notice the animals.

According to the DFO, Dalhbhum, Abhishek Kumar, a trained rescue team of the department has been sent to the incident site to help the villagers and to inspect the corridor.

Notably, three villagers were killed in elephant related incidents in 2018 in the Ghatshila sub-division.

In May last year, two villagers identified as Geetalata Devi, 83, and Sudhir Mardi, 16, were trampled to death by elephants herd in Chakulia. In another incident in June, 2018 one person, identified as Ram Chandra Pani, 67, was killed in Bansdih in Ghatshila police station area.

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Saturday, February 02, 2019

Elephants’ love for liquor takes a heavy toll on human life


Patna: Elephants’ love for alcohol has resulted in alarming rise in attacks on human population in recent months, prompting the authorities to advise them against storing intoxicants at home.

The tribal villagers in Jharkhand have been surviving by brewing liquor from mahua, a forest product used for preparing liquor at home and available in plenty in the nearby forests.

But villagers’ move to store these intoxicating stuff at home is now proving costlier as the rampaging elephants too have now developed a taste for these for this locally-made alcohol, villagers and officials said.

The desperate tuskers are now attacking villages and damaging homes after smelling scents of this alcohol wafting through the air in the jungle which is their homes. Unable to find them, the elephants either eat away the grains stored in the homes or kill the villagers, reports said.

Officials say that is one bad habit of the tusker which they have picked up from the local villagers who are addicted to locally-made liquor available at low price. “They (elephants) can go to any extent and wreak havoc for liquor,” said another forest official.

On Saturday morning again, a herd of some 15 elephants attakced a village in Jharkhand’s Simdega block and damaged five homes before eating away grains stored there. They also trampled one woman to death while other villagers managed to escape after listening to the alarms.

Soon after getting the information, a team of forest officials rushed to the spot and asked the villages to be cautious from the herds of animals. They also advised the villagers against storing raw materials used for preparing liquor at home. “You should avoid storing intoxicants or raw materials, such as mahua (Madhuca longifolia) used for brewing liquor at home as the elephants easily get attracted to them,” a forest official Binod Kumar told the villagers.

In December again, a herd of 22 elephants raided many villages in three districts of Jharkhand and killed five villagers. According to an official reports, more than 1,000 people have been killed by the herds of elephant since the state was carved out of Bihar in November 2000.

Apart from their love for liquor, officials cite the depleting forest cover and shortage of their food behind the increasing man-animal conflicts. Experts say the elephants normally require around 500km of home range to hunt for food and consume 250kg of food and 150 litres of water a day for which they migrate from one corner to another.

But what is serious, the human population is rather encroaching into elephants’ habitats as they battle hard for food, resulting in attacks on villagers’ homes.

Alarmed at the prevailing situation, the authorities are now working on a plan to develop a green wall outside the human population by planting huge number of trees and arrange for their food and water in the forest itself to prevent them intruding into the human’s populace. Their focus is on making large number of bamboo plantation.

“We can’t claim to give a permanent solution to the problem yet we are doing something which could check cases of elephants-men conflicts. In order to achieve this task, we are increasing green cover of bamboo trees and arranging for their water in the forest itself,” Jharkhand’s principal chief conservator of forests Sanjay Kumar told the local media.

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Wild elephant Chinnathambi to be captured, says Forest Minister


The tusker continues to venture into villages near Pollachi and Udumalpet, and will have to be captured and turned to a kumki
Translocated wild elephant Chinnathambi, which continues to venture into villages near Pollachi and Udumalpet in Tamil Nadu, will have to be captured and turned to a kumki, Minister for Forests Dindigul C. Sreenivasan said here on Saturday.  

"There is no other option left. It has to be captured again (to be tamed as kumki)" Mr. Sreenivasan told The Hindu.  

According to the Minister, the Forest Department took all efforts to rehabilitate the wild elephant in the forest, first by driving it out to the forests of Thadagam valley, its home turf, and then translocating it to Varagaliar forest near Top Slip.  

"The elephant has been entering villages in the last few days even after translocation and has crossed over 80 km. Now the animal has stationed itself near Udumalpet. The Government has a larger role to protect the lives of the people and their agricultural fields. There is no other option left now but to capture the animal and tame it to be used as a kumki," said Mr. Sreenivasan, addressing a gathering at the Ecological Conference for Saving the Western Ghats being held in Coimbatore.  

Chinnathambi, a tusker aged around 25 years, was translocated to Varagaliar on January 26. On Saturday morning, Chinnathambi was at Ammapatty near Udumalpet.

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Control elephant population: former WII Dean


A.J.T. Johnsingh, former dean of the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), said here on Friday that there was a need to control the elephant population in the country. Contraception could be a solution, as done in Africa, he said.

“In my opinion, the elephant population in the country needs to be controlled. Elephants can be neutered for birth control as done in some countries in Africa. They don't need to be culled,” he said in reply to a question on the ever increasing human-elephant conflicts.

“Around 500 people are killed in attacks by wild elephants every year in the country. No country will allow elephants killing its people,” he said.

According to Mr. Johnsingh, the main reason for elephants straying out of forests in search of fodder was the degradation of the habitat. “The size of forests have not shrunk significantly. But the quality of the habitat has reduced. Invasive species have spread fast in the forests. These are inedible plants, and the lack of fodder could force elephants to come out of forests,” he said.

Mr. Johnsingh said more focus was required on protecting three major elephant corridors in the south -- Aryankavu, Kallar and Mukurthi -- for smooth movement of elephants, and thus reduce conflicts.

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Friday, February 01, 2019

Tusker Karthik dies of bee attack at Dubare elephant camp


Madikeri, Feb 1 (UNI) A nine year old male elephant ‘Karthik” died as bee attacked it at dubare
elephant camp near Kushalanagara in the district. Karthik had mauled two mahouts to death
last year.

Forest officials said on Friday that Karthik, the calf of elephant Vijya of the camp had killed
mahouts Annu and Mani, recently he had also attacked mahout Naveen and worker Chandru ,
leaving them seriously injured. Naveen had to undergo an intestinal surgery. now he has been
discharged and department had paid him Rs 2 lakh as compensation.

After the incidents, the elephant tied and was kept in isolation in an attempt to control is
aggressive nature.

The postmortem was done by Dr Mujeeb who explained the cause of death. Officials said that
Elephant was stung by forest fees but nobody was aware of it. the bleeds had sung the jumbo on
its rear. It was when 'Karthik' attacked his mahouts two weeks ago that they released the jumbo
was unwell and in pain because of the sting which had got infected. Though it was treated by
experts it could not recover and died on Thursday in the camp, the officials added.

UNI BSP MSP SKB1750

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Female elephant killed after being hit by goods train


Dhenkanal, Feb 1 (PTI) A female elephant was killed after being hit by a goods train in Odishas Dhenkanal district Friday, a Forest official said.

The incident took place when a herd of elephants was crossing the tracks near between Dhenkanal and Dandimal, the official said.

Additional Chief Conservator of Forest, Jitendranath Das reached the spot and has initiated an investigation, he said.

In a similar incident, a female elephant was killed after being hit by a train near Ramachandrapur in Keonjhar district in November last year.

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.

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Indian authorities use elephants to catch man-eating tiger


Description

A tiger suspected of killing two people was darted and caught on Friday in southern India.

Seven trained elephants were used to corner the big cat near Nagarahole National Park in the state of Karnataka.

A vet then shot the tiger with a tranquilising dart and the animal was covered with a net before being transferred to a cage.

The tiger was expected to be moved to a conservation centre.

The cat is suspected of killing two residents of a local village in a space of four days.

Villagers launched protests, blaming the rise in tourism for disturbing the animal.

However, forestry officials said the tiger had a deformed leg which made catching its natural prey difficult which turned it into a man-eater.

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Elephant gores mahout to death at temple in India Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2019/02/01/elephant-gores-mahout-to-death-at-temple-in-india/#8G48Z578d8JMZZ7g.99


A MAHOUT in Kerala, India was gored to death by an elephant named Kutty Sangaran during a temple festival.

Tamil Nesan reported that the 39-year-old man was leading a procession of 21 elephants during a temple festival with Kutty Sangaran in the lead.

To read the full article, click on the story title.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Translocated tusker travels 50 KM to reach human habitat


Coimbatore, Jan 31 (PTI) A 25-year-old wild elephant, which was captured and translocated to the reserve forests at Varagaliyar last week, has travelled about 50 km and entered Angalakurichi village, police said Thursday.

The jumbo, called ‘Chinnathambi’ by locals, was tranquilised and translocated from Thadagam area, 50-60 km from Pollachi, by forest department personnel.

The pachyderm was also fitted with a radio-collar to monitor its movements.

Over the past seven months, the elephant had destroyed crops and the forest department decided to translocate him following complaints from the local people.

The people of Angalakurichi woke up Thursday on hearing the elephant’s trumpeting and it was found moving in front of their houses, police said, adding it did not disturb any villager.

Forest department officials from Pollachi division rushed to the spot and drove the elephant, which travelled about 50 km from Varagaliyar, back into the forests, police said.

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Rogue elephant returns to search for family after being relocated


Description

Edited text Original text Chinnathambi the rogue elephant returned to a town in south India after being transported away by forest officials several days earlier to search for his mate and calf.

Footage from the 25-year-old elephant's march today (January 31) through the town of Pollachi in Tamil Nadu state shows him undeterred by firecrackers and screaming people as he walked through the streets.

Chinnathambi was originally separated from his group and transported to a forest reserve after he started raiding village crops for food, damaging a tusk during his first capture by forest officials.

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Dramatic moment just shifted rogue elephant returns to Indian village


Description Chinna Thambi, the rogue elephant which was recently translocated to deep forests, has returned to human habitat.

The elephant entered Angalakurichi village near Pollachi on January 31 creating a new headache for forest officials.

Though villagers managed to drive it away by bursting crackers, Chinna Thambi has opted to stay on the outskirts of the village.

The forest department department officials had earlier captured and shifted the rogue elephant to Varakaliyar forest near Topslip.

But in less than a week Chinna Thambi found his way back to a village about 30 kms away from where he was left.

The elephant, which earlier lived in the Thadagam reserve forest, had become notorious for raiding crops and even homes looking for food.

Fed up with menace, local villagers had gone on protest forcing the forest department to act.

In a dramatic day-long operation on January 25, Chinna Thambi was tranquilised, tied up with ropes and then shifted to his new home on a truck.

And in less than a week, he has returned to prove that old habits die hard.

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Rejuvenated elephants return for temple work


THE last day of the annual rejuvenation camp at Thekkampatti near Mettupalayam was perhaps the hardest for the mahouts and kavadis caring for the temple animals. Understandably,
no jumbo had the desire to part with their friends or the place of rest and comfort. It took the
handlers quite some time to get the animals on to the waiting trucks. By the time Minister
Sevvoor S Ramachandran agged o the 28 elephants, the sadness for their departure was
mingled with some relief for the end of the day’s work.

Speaking at the closing event, the minister said that all animals had been fed green fodder,
besides astasooranam, bioboost, etc., to maintain their health. Their diet was as prescribed by
veterinarians. The animals had also been made to walk ve kilometres every morning and
evening during the 48 days of the camp. Mahouts and kavadis were given special training to
take better care of elephants and bond with them, he detailed.

For the entertainment of the caretakers, yoga and sports competitions was conducted for
them, he added.

K Rajesh, handler for Srirangam Temple’s Andal, reported that she had spent the entire stay
in a happy mood and was well, mentally and physically. While she had been subjected to a
time schedule at the temple, she had been free of it all at the camp and had enjoyed it, he
added. However, she and a few other elephants had experienced some uneasiness due to the
weather, he said.

He remarked that this year’s camp was much more organised that the ones of the past decade.
All arrangements had been well taken care of, he mentioned.

According to HR and CE Joint Commissioner K Rajamanickam, the government had allotted
1.47 crore for the camp this year’s camp. Sources said that they would soon know if additional
funds were required to settle the payments. A team from Vandalur had taken blood and hair
samples from all elephants at the camp as part of the identication process. This was the rst
time such a process has been done a the camp, they added.
K Rajesh, Andal’s mahout

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Elephant rejuvenation camp ends


Curtains came down on the State-sponsored 11th annual rejuvenation camp for temple and mutt elephants at Thekkampatti near Mettupalayam on Wednesday.

The 48-day camp started on December 14 and as many as 26 elephants from Tamil Nadu and one each from Puducherry and Karaikal took part.

The daily schedule for the elephants at the camp included a morning walk, shower and a diet prepared based on the age, gender, and health of the elephants. The camp was also to rejuvenate the mahouts and cavadis.

Foot wash

Forest Veterinarian N.S. Manoharan said that the elephants were given a foot wash with herbal oil during the 48-day period.

The camp was conducted by the Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments (HR and CE) Department and the Forest and Animal Husbandry Departments, under the supervision of V. Vetriselvan, Executive Officer, HR and CE. The State Government had spent ₹1.45 crore towards the camp.

On Wednesday, a special puja was held and the elephants were fed fruits by the Minister for Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments, Sevoor S. Ramachandran. The elephants were then boarded on to the trucks and sent to their respective temples and mutts.

The elephants, on leaving the camp, will get a standardised diet as per the chart prepared towards the conclusion of the camp. The temples have been asked to continuously monitor the health card and bring it next year.

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Monday, January 21, 2019

Supreme Court Makes It Clear, Elephants Have First Right On Forest, Orders Demolition Of A Wall Blocking Jumbo Path


For centuries, herds of elephants have lived in the forest and have crisscrossed it walking miles at a stretch searching for food and water. But thanks to humans, the wild elephants are increasingly finding it difficult to travel through their traditional migratory paths which they have used for generations.

That is because we humans have built highways and railway tracks inside dense forests, effectively cutting the wildlife crossings in the middle. And if that wasn't enough we have made massive walls and fences around the roads on the pretext of 'keeping the wild animals safe' from speeding vehicles and trains.

Basically telling the wild animals to forget about their traditional migratory routes and walk some more kilometers extra around the blockades and find a new path.

But, animals being animals did not get the message and continued trying to cross through the same paths often ending up dead on roads and railway tracks after being hit by speeding vehicles and trains.

Now, the Supreme Court in an order that could have far reaching implication has ruled that elephants have the first right on the forest. (like someone had to be told that!)

A two member bench of the Supreme Court while ordering the demolition of a boundary wall in the middle of an elephant corridor in Deopahar Reserve Forest in Assam's Golaghat made it clear that the right of wild animals on the forests cannot be overlooked.

The border wall, which had barbed wire on top of it was built in an area spanning 2.2-kilometre was built by the state-run Numaligarh Refinery Ltd (NRL) in 2011, for its housing estate which included a a golf course in the middle of an elephant corridor!

The wall courted controversy after a series of elephant deaths there, after the jumbos died of severe haemorrhage from hitting their head against the wall in attempt to bring it down.

In 2015 environmentalists had captured videos showing elephants trying to cross the high boundary wall.

Environmentalist and RTI Activist Rohit Choudhury had filed a petition against the wall in the NGT in 2015. In August 2016 the NGT ordered the NRL to demolish the wall and slapped it an environment compensation of Rs 25 lakh on NRL for destruction of forest cover in Golaghat district to construct a boundary wall for a golf course.

NRL however filed an review petition claiming that the township was cleared by the State Environment Impact Assessment Authority and there was no need to demolish the entire wall as it was not a part of the Deopahar Reserve Forest.

Rejecting the appeal in August 2018, the bench headed by NGT Chairperson Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel said the elephant corridors have to be preserved to protect their habitats from fragmentation.

"We are of the view that in view of categorical finding already recorded by the tribunal that the area where the wall came up and the area where proposed township is to come up is a part of the Deopahar Reserve Forest, rehearing on merits is not permissible. Accordingly, we do not find any ground for review of order dated August 24, 2016. The review application is dismissed," the bench had said.

NRL had filed the review despite in 2107 the Assam government asking it to demolish the wall which the company said was to secure the residential complex for the refinery workers.

Even after the NGT rejecting its review plea the NRL moved the SC to keep its wall intact.

But on January 18 a two-judge bench of the SC comprising of Justices D Y Chandrachud and M R Shah ruled that whatever is left of of the wall should be demolished.

"Elephants have the first right on the forest. Elephants do not go to office in a designated route. We cannot encroach upon the elephant’s area," Justice Chandrachud observed.

Talking to Indiatimes Rohit Choudhury said the SC order was a welcome step in protecting wildlife and especially elephants.

"I am very happy with the verdict of the Supreme Court. It is a victory for the elephants. Hopefully now NRL will demolish the walls so that elephants can move freely in that area. It will also help in reducing the man-animal conflict in the region".

He also added that the SC observation is in line with the NGT order which had already held that elephants had the first right to forest.

"Earlier itself the NGT had ruled in favour of the elephants. But the NRL was not willing to accept it and went for an appeal. I am happy that the SC found that there was no merit in it," he said.

The order is significant and has far reaching implication on asserting the right of wild animals on forests.

This is especially significant in places like the Bandipur National Park in Karnataka where a proposed elevated corridor which would have passed through several key wildlife crossings.

Earlier this month, taking note of the opposition from the state government and environmentalists, Mahesh Sharma, MoS Environment Forests and Climate Change had said that the corridor which comprises of elevated structures at four regular intervals, as suggested by the Union Ministry of Road Transport, has not been concurred with.

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Agitated temple elephant in India temple runs amok amidst devotees during popular festival


Devotees at a temple in South India survived a major scare after an elephant ran amok on Sunday. The incident happened when the elephant, Ramu, was brought out for a ceremonial parade at Edappal temple near Mallapuram, Kerala. The elephant is a major draw at the annual 'Kulangara Pooram' festival, in which thousands of devotees take part. But its owners failed to notice that the male tusker was 'in musth' - a term used to describe elephants exhibit highly aggressive behavior as a result...

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Elephant 'Lakshmi' steals the show at rejuvenation camp with her mouth organ playing skills


'Lakshmi', a female elephant has become famous among locals at a rejuvenation camp in Thekkampatti. She has almost aced the art of playing mouth organ. All credits go to her mahout Balan. He kept on trying to train Lakshmi and finally succeeded. India has over 50 percent of Asiatic elephant population, which are considered intelligent.

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Elephant rides on vacation: Beware of risk of infection


A popular tourist activity in many holiday resorts in Asia and Africa is riding elephants. But animal protection activists advise against it, not only for the creature’s sake, but also because of the danger of humans becoming infected if the elephant is sick.

The animal protection group PETA cites a 2018 report from the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI which showed that elephants ill with tuberculosis were being used for rides at Amber Fort just outside the city of Jaipur. PETA advises people to avoid contact with the animals and if possible even to avoid the area in question altogether.

At Amber Fort, 10 elephants had tested positive for tuberculosis.

Additionally, all the animals had problems with their feet, and some had vision problems and were forced to carry too heavy a load.

Local media reports said that on the order of the authorities, all the tuberculosis-infected elephants were no longer being used for rides. Amber Fort is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the state of Rajasthan. The fort is situated atop a hill, and elephants usually bring the tourists up, though the trail’s walkable. – dpa

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Elephant 'Lakshmi' steals the show at rejuvenation camp with her mouth organ playing skills


'Lakshmi', a female elephant has become famous among locals at a rejuvenation camp in Thekkampatti. She has almost aced the art of playing mouth organ. All credits go to her mahout Balan. He kept on trying to train Lakshmi and finally succeeded. India has over 50 percent of Asiatic elephant population, which are considered intelligent.

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https://in.news.yahoo.com/elephant-lakshmi-steals-show-rejuvenation-174500985.html

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Walls Come Down: Indian Court Rules Against Forest Barrier Obstructing Elephants


India’s highest court has decreed that an obstructing wall built illegally by a state-owned oil refinery in the nation’s heavily-forested northeastern regions must come down.

In a Friday ruling, the Supreme Court of India dismissed an appeal from an oil refinery to maintain a wall in an elephant migration corridor in the Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat, in the extreme northeastern regions of India.

Illegally built in a heavily-forested area, the wall obstructs elephant migration and other wildlife movement, according to reports and studies from environmental groups and wildlife organizations.

In striking down the appeal from state-owned fossil fuel facility Numaligarh Refinery Ltd, the nation's top judges noted that "Elephants have first right on forest," cited by the NEnow.in news group.

A lawsuit to demolish the man-made forest barrier first gained traction following the May 2015 death of a 7-year-old male elephant due to a ‘severe haemorrhage' after it attempted to smash its way through the oil refinery wall.

Environmentalists recorded multiple instances of elephants using legacy migration pathways attempting to get through areas in which the refinery had illegally constructed barriers.

The walls, built in an area declared in 1996 by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change to be a No Development Zone, prevented the migration of the huge mammals and presented a danger to their livelihood, according to animal researchers in the region.

A regional court allowed for the refinery to open a small part of the wall in 2016. Environmentalist groups and locals working together then successfully fought for the demolition of the entire wall.

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https://sputniknews.com/environment/201901201071659442-top-indian-Court-Rules-Against-wall/

Walls Come Down: Indian Court Rules Against Forest Barrier Obstructing Elephants



India’s highest court has decreed that an obstructing wall built illegally by a state-owned oil refinery in the nation’s heavily-forested northeastern regions must come down.

In a Friday ruling, the Supreme Court of India dismissed an appeal from an oil refinery to maintain a wall in an elephant migration corridor in the Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat, in the extreme northeastern regions of India.

Illegally built in a heavily-forested area, the wall obstructs elephant migration and other wildlife movement, according to reports and studies from environmental groups and wildlife organizations.

In striking down the appeal from state-owned fossil fuel facility Numaligarh Refinery Ltd, the nation's top judges noted that "Elephants have first right on forest," cited by the NEnow.in news group.

A lawsuit to demolish the man-made forest barrier first gained traction following the May 2015 death of a 7-year-old male elephant due to a ‘severe haemorrhage' after it attempted to smash its way through the oil refinery wall.

Environmentalists recorded multiple instances of elephants using legacy migration pathways attempting to get through areas in which the refinery had illegally constructed barriers.

The walls, built in an area declared in 1996 by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change to be a No Development Zone, prevented the migration of the huge mammals and presented a danger to their livelihood, according to animal researchers in the region.

A regional court allowed for the refinery to open a small part of the wall in 2016. Environmentalist groups and locals working together then successfully fought for the demolition of the entire wall.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://sputniknews.com/environment/201901201071659442-top-indian-Court-Rules-Against-wall/

Elephant herd tramples elderly women to death in Chamarajanagara taluk


Chamarajanagar, Jan 20 (UNI) A 70-year-old women was trampled to death by wild elephants
herd at Mahantalapura village in Chamarajanagara taluk in an agricultural field.

Forest officials said on Sunday that the incident came into light this morning when the villagers
found the body of women on Sunday after the attack by elephants on Saturday evening.

As the news spread, the enraged villagers blocked the national highway 209 that cut through the
village, for some time till police arrived to clear the vehicular traffic.

The deceased women was identified as Shivamma.

The incident took place when Shivamma ventured out of the house late Saturday evening as the
a herd of wild elephants that included a tusker, a female and a calf, entered Hasanakatte hamlet
near Managala village. This created panic among the villagers as the herd destroyed the crop
fields and many other things.

The elephants were again sighted behind sericulture department building at Hasanakatte and
the forest staff led in-charge RFO Mahadevaiah even bursted crackers to drive the elephant back
to the forest. Instead, the panicked elephants started running here and there, and entered a
sugar cane field and thus they might have trampled the woman there, officials said.

Bilirangana Tiger Reserve Conservator of Forests Dr Shankar, ACF Nagaraju, Tahasildar
Purandra and others visited the spot and met the villagers to convince them to withdraw protest.

The protesting villagers demanded compensation to the woman's family and the farmers who
lost their crops.

UNI BSP RS ASN JW1849

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http://www.uniindia.com/~/elephant-herd-tramples-elderly-women-to-death-in-chamarajanagara-taluk/States/news/1473723.html

Elephant herd tramples elderly women to death in Chamarajanagara taluk


Chamarajanagar, Jan 20 (UNI) A 70-year-old women was trampled to death by wild elephants
herd at Mahantalapura village in Chamarajanagara taluk in an agricultural field.

Forest officials said on Sunday that the incident came into light this morning when the villagers
found the body of women on Sunday after the attack by elephants on Saturday evening.

As the news spread, the enraged villagers blocked the national highway 209 that cut through the
village, for some time till police arrived to clear the vehicular traffic.

The deceased women was identified as Shivamma.

The incident took place when Shivamma ventured out of the house late Saturday evening as the
a herd of wild elephants that included a tusker, a female and a calf, entered Hasanakatte hamlet
near Managala village. This created panic among the villagers as the herd destroyed the crop
fields and many other things.

The elephants were again sighted behind sericulture department building at Hasanakatte and
the forest staff led in-charge RFO Mahadevaiah even bursted crackers to drive the elephant back
to the forest. Instead, the panicked elephants started running here and there, and entered a
sugar cane field and thus they might have trampled the woman there, officials said.

Bilirangana Tiger Reserve Conservator of Forests Dr Shankar, ACF Nagaraju, Tahasildar
Purandra and others visited the spot and met the villagers to convince them to withdraw protest.

The protesting villagers demanded compensation to the woman's family and the farmers who
lost their crops.

UNI BSP RS ASN JW1849

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http://www.uniindia.com/~/elephant-herd-tramples-elderly-women-to-death-in-chamarajanagara-taluk/States/news/1473723.html

Chained Elephant run amonk in southern India


Description

Chained Elephant run amok 

At Edappal in India

Of malappuram district. Elephant name Ramu who was chained & was in religious ceremony run amok. Luckily no one was injured in the incidents.

The incident happened on 20 in Malappuram district Kerala India

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https://www.newsflare.com/video/271121/animals/chained-elephant-run-amonk-in-southern-india

Chained Elephant run amonk in southern India


Description

Chained Elephant run amok

At Edappal in India

Of malappuram district. Elephant name Ramu who was chained & was in religious ceremony run amok. Luckily no one was injured in the incidents.

The incident happened on 20 in Malappuram district Kerala India

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.newsflare.com/video/271121/animals/chained-elephant-run-amonk-in-southern-india

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/dehradun/rajaji-jumbo-corridor-was-awarded-thrice-to-same-firm/articleshowprint/67605826.cms


DEHRADUN: The elephant underpass in Rajaji National Park (RNP) that has been hanging for nine years was awarded thrice to the same defaulting firm.

The 36.5-km national highway project was supposed to be completed in two years’ time. Sources told TOI that a Noida-based firm was awarded the project thrice in 2011, 2013 and 2015, but it failed to execute the work citing “fund shortage”.

Finally, in May last year, the project was shelved.

Irked by the failure of National Highway Authority of India (NHAI) to comply with a Supreme Court directive to construct the elephant corridor even after nine years, the National Green Tribunal (NGT) had on Friday asked NHAI submit Rs 2 crore as ‘performance guarantee’ to the environment ministry within a month.

The six-metre-high and 721-metre-long elephant underpass at Chilla Motichur Corridor, which is a part of the four-laning of Haridwar-Dehradun section of NH-58 and NH-72 that passes through RNP, will ensure that the eastern side of RNP will get connected with western side resulting into free movement of wildlife.

An NGT bench headed by Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel had observed that wildlife, biodiversity and environment of the western side of RNP was in danger due to the red-tape attitude of NHAI.

The letter of agreement between the firm and NHAI was finalised in November 2011 for project completion in 730 days (October 31, 2013). A senior NHAI officer said, “When the firm couldn’t meet the deadline, a ‘cure period notice’ was signed in 2014. Following which, the company was kept under watch in 2014 and progress on the project was monitored. Then again in September 2016, the firm was granted extension but the contract was terminated soon after.”

However, lenders (consortium of banks) of the firm approached the Centre to once again consider their plea of completing the project as it had already completed half the work. They added that due to ‘fund shortage,’ the firm couldn’t complete the entire work.

The NHAI had submitted to NGT, a copy of which is with TOI that the firm “completely failed in their performance and could not adhere to the targets provided”.

At present, the entire project has been divided into two parts and has been given to two firms — Uttar Pradesh Bridge Corporation and Delhi-based Atlas —for completion by January 2020.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/dehradun/rajaji-jumbo-corridor-was-awarded-thrice-to-same-firm/articleshowprint/67605826.cms

Rajaji jumbo corridor was awarded thrice to same firm


DEHRADUN: The elephant underpass in Rajaji National Park (RNP) that has been hanging for nine years was awarded thrice to the same defaulting firm.

The 36.5-km national highway project was supposed to be completed in two years’ time. Sources told TOI that a Noida-based firm was awarded the project thrice in 2011, 2013 and 2015, but it failed to execute the work citing “fund shortage”.

Finally, in May last year, the project was shelved.

Irked by the failure of National Highway Authority of India (NHAI) to comply with a Supreme Court directive to construct the elephant corridor even after nine years, the National Green Tribunal (NGT) had on Friday asked NHAI submit Rs 2 crore as ‘performance guarantee’ to the environment ministry within a month.

The six-metre-high and 721-metre-long elephant underpass at Chilla Motichur Corridor, which is a part of the four-laning of Haridwar-Dehradun section of NH-58 and NH-72 that passes through RNP, will ensure that the eastern side of RNP will get connected with western side resulting into free movement of wildlife.

An NGT bench headed by Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel had observed that wildlife, biodiversity and environment of the western side of RNP was in danger due to the red-tape attitude of NHAI.

The letter of agreement between the firm and NHAI was finalised in November 2011 for project completion in 730 days (October 31, 2013). A senior NHAI officer said, “When the firm couldn’t meet the deadline, a ‘cure period notice’ was signed in 2014. Following which, the company was kept under watch in 2014 and progress on the project was monitored. Then again in September 2016, the firm was granted extension but the contract was terminated soon after.”

However, lenders (consortium of banks) of the firm approached the Centre to once again consider their plea of completing the project as it had already completed half the work. They added that due to ‘fund shortage,’ the firm couldn’t complete the entire work.

The NHAI had submitted to NGT, a copy of which is with TOI that the firm “completely failed in their performance and could not adhere to the targets provided”.

At present, the entire project has been divided into two parts and has been given to two firms — Uttar Pradesh Bridge Corporation and Delhi-based Atlas —for completion by January 2020.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/dehradun/rajaji-jumbo-corridor-was-awarded-thrice-to-same-firm/articleshow/67605826.cms

Elephant Rejuvenation Camp: Jumbo who plays mouth organ


At the recent Temple Elephant Rejuvenation Camp, Lakshmi impressed onlookers with her prowess and left them awestruck wtih with her talent of playing mouth organ with her trunk.

The camp is a rejuvenation time for elephants from across Tamil Nadu and Puducherry who are brought here annually.

"My elephant's name is Lakshmi. She can play the mouth organ. It was very hard to train her to play the organ and she initially broke five instruments. Gradually she began to understand what I say and now my Lakshmi can play for 15 minutes without stopping in our temple," said the elephants mahout of the Erattai Thirupathy Temple.

Also read: Ram Temple row: Joshi's statement was misquoted, says VHP

At the camp, elephants receive royal treatment, served nutritious food and medicines a good shower and a brisk walk twice a day to improve their health.

During the 48-day event they also undergo health screening and treatment for various ailments and infections.

The caretaker of the elephants believes the camp held once a year is very good for their animals and offers a bonding place for elephants who are brought here from different temples and mutts.

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http://m.eenaduindia.com/states/south/tamil-nadu/2019/01/20233922/Elephant-Rejuvenation-Camp-Jumbo-who-plays-mouth-organ.vpf

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Herds of Elephant crossing road in southern India


Description

Herds of Elephant crossing road in southern India.

Today morning heards of elephant crossing road in Anchetty area Krishnagiri district Tamil Nadu India.

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https://www.newsflare.com/video/270824/animals/herds-of-elephant-crossing-road-in-southern-india

Herds of Elephant crossing road in southern India


Description

Herds of Elephant crossing road in southern India.

Today morning heards of elephant crossing road in Anchetty area Krishnagiri district Tamil Nadu India.

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https://www.newsflare.com/video/270824/animals/herds-of-elephant-crossing-road-in-southern-india

Two elephants electrocuted in India by ‘dangerously low’ hanging wires


Two wild elephants die after being electrocuted by ‘dangerously low’ hanging wires that have been simply TWO FEET off the bottom in Indian village
  • Mammals discovered mendacity in paddy discipline in Gurguripal, in West Bengal, jap India
  • Herd of a minimum of 80 elephants had been in Nepura village for practically three weeks
  • Specialists have criticised state electrical energy board WBSEC for ignoring warnings 
By

Dianne Apen-sadler For Mailonline

Printed:

10:48 GMT, 19 January 2019

Up to date:

12:01 GMT, 19 January 2019

Two wild elephants have died after being electrocuted by ‘dangerously low’ hanging wires in India.

The mammals have been discovered mendacity in a paddy discipline in Nepura village in Gurguripal in West Bengal, jap India.

A herd of a minimum of 80 elephants had been roaming across the village for 2 weeks earlier than the elephants got here into contact with the wires, which have been mendacity solely two toes above the bottom, on Saturday morning.

Specialists have criticised the state electrical energy board WBSEC, with one claiming they’d been warned concerning the wire beforehand.

Two elephants have been electrocuted in Gurguripal in West Bengal, jap India, this morning

The animals had wandered into ‘dangerously low’ hanging electrical energy wires in Nepura village

Picutred: native villagers collect to observe the elephants be taken away by a JCB machine

Dr Pradeep Vyas, principal chief conservator of the forest chief wildlife warden, stated: ‘The animals have been there for nearly three weeks and have been vandalising the retailers and homes of native folks and even stealing rice.

‘They even destroyed the paddy discipline and different meals grains. Two of them have been electrified by the excessive rigidity wire, which was mendacity low.

‘We informed WBSEC they need to repair the wire as a result of it was an elephant zone on a number of events.

‘However due to their negligence it occurred many times – final yr one other incident of this sort occurred.’

The animals have been discovered lifeless by native villagers who knowledgeable the forest division – with consultants criticising the state electrical energy board WBSEC.

Rabindranath Saha, Divisional Forest Officer, stated: ‘The our bodies of two full-seized elephants have been discovered mendacity within the paddy discipline at Nepura village below Gurguripal police station space on Saturday morning.

‘It appears they died from electrocution. A few of the high-voltage cables are sagging dangerously low within the space.

‘These may cause loss of life and harm to folks understanding within the discipline as effectively. Now we have knowledgeable the facility division.’

Specialists have criticised the state electrical energy board WBSEC, with one claiming they’d been warned concerning the wire beforehand, and that it had occurred earlier than

Dr Pradeep Vyas, principal chief conservator of the forest chief wildlife warden, stated: ‘We informed WBSEC they need to repair the wire as a result of it was an elephant zone on a number of events. However due to their negligence it occurred many times’

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https://www.theweeklyn.com/2019/01/19/two-elephants-electrocuted-in-india-by-dangerously-low-hanging-wires/

Indian Villagers Hurl Firebombs at Elephant and Her Calf for 'Damaging Crops’


For centuries, the Asian elephant was regarded as a cultural icon of India. But now, a large number of farmers and civilians view the giant land mammal to be a pest. This was again made evident when a mob of people in an Indian village brutally attacked an elephant and her calf with firebombs.

Two photographs recently surfaced showing elephants crossing a road. Behind them, an angry mob of men can be seen launching flaming missiles at the fleeing pachyderms. As reported by The Independent, the incident occurred in the village of Bishnupur, a remote settlement in West Bengal.

The compelling photographs were captured by Biplab Hazra. His goal being to showcase violence against the endangered species as it attempts to survive in smaller and more fragmented habitats.

Sadly, encounters of the sort captured in Hazra’s photographs are becoming increasingly common. The primary cause of conflict? Deforestation. As land is clear-cut, wild animals are left with less and less space to live. This is causing them to venture into territories occupied by humans.

As the images reveal, villagers are going to extreme lengths to drive elephants from their fields. The land is their livelihood, so one can understand the desperate attempts to scare away the elephants. However, to the observer, it is clear they, too, are simply victims of urban expansion.

Regarding the use of fire, Hazra told Caters News Agency:
“This happens because the villagers have to save their crops. There are many elephant corridors in human habitations. I’m trying to show this and spread my photos to increase public awareness on the matter.”
Each day, elephants spend up to 19 hours foraging for food. During this time, they also produce 220 pounds of feces. The elephant is a gargantuan land mammal that requires ample space to roam freely. If this need isn’t met, the elephants will continue to search for food elsewhere.

This reality needs to be realized by all, not only the Indian villagers who rely on the elephant’s dung to germinate their crops. To survive into the 22nd century, mammals will need the help of humankind. Discovering a tactic to resolve these conflicts is of the utmost importance. Otherwise, elephants — both African and Asian — may one day only exist in history books.

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https://themindunleashed.com/2019/01/indian-villagers-hurl-firebombs-elephant.html

Two elephants electrocuted in India by 'dangerously low' hanging wires


Two wild elephants have died after being electrocuted by 'dangerously low' hanging wires in India.

The mammals were found lying in a paddy field in Nepura village in Gurguripal in West Bengal, eastern India.

A herd of at least 80 elephants had been roaming around the village for two weeks before the elephants came into contact with the wires, which were lying only two feet above the ground, on Saturday morning.

Experts have criticised the state electricity board WBSEC, with one claiming they had been warned about the wire previously.

Dr Pradeep Vyas, principal chief conservator of the forest chief wildlife warden, said: 'The animals were there for almost three weeks and were vandalising the shops and houses of local people and even stealing rice.

'They even destroyed the paddy field and other food grains. Two of them were electrified by the high tension wire, which was lying low.

'We told WBSEC they should fix the wire because it was an elephant zone on several occasions.

'But because of their negligence it happened again and again - last year another incident of this kind happened.'

The animals were found dead by local villagers who informed the forest department - with experts criticising the state electricity board WBSEC.

Rabindranath Saha, Divisional Forest Officer, said: 'The bodies of two full-seized elephants were found lying in the paddy field at Nepura village under Gurguripal police station area on Saturday morning.

'It seems they died from electrocution. Some of the high-voltage cables are sagging dangerously low in the area.

'These can cause death and damage to people working out in the field as well. We have informed the power department.'

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6609759/Two-elephants-electrocuted-India-dangerously-low-hanging-wires.html

Friday, January 18, 2019

Assam: SC orders demolition of NRL boundary wall for elephants


The Supreme Court of India on Friday dismissed an appeal filed by Numaligarh Refinery Ltd (NRL) and ordered demolition of the entire 2.2 km boundary wall blocking an elephant migration corridor in Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat.

The apex court said that “Elephants have first right on forest”.

The wall became the eye of a storm in 2015 after a 7-year-old male elephant that had reportedly died of “severe haemorrhage” in May that year from violently thrusting against the wall.

The same year, environmentalists captured videos showing elephants trying to cross the high boundary wall.

The green crusaders then started demanding demolition of the wall built by the oil refinery. It was alleged that the wall and the refinery township were being built illegally in a “No Development Zone” declared by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF) in 1996.

In August 2016, the National Green Tribunal (NGT) ordered NRL to demolish the entire length of the wall within a month. But only a 289-metre stretch was demolished.

As per reports, the NRL challenged the NGT order, saying the entire wall need not be demolished as it is not a part of Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat.

Gauhati High Court has stayed any further demolition of the Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL) boundary wall as ordered by the National Green Tribunal (NGT) last month.

The NRL claimed it had paid Rs 25 lakh to the State Forest Department, which will be kept in a separate bank account for restoration of the area and for the improvement of the surroundings adjoining the NRL complex and to reduce man-animal conflict especially man-elephant conflict.

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https://nenow.in/north-east-news/assam-sc-orders-demolition-of-nrl-boundary-wall-for-elephants.html

Assam: SC orders demolition of NRL boundary wall for elephants


The Supreme Court of India on Friday dismissed an appeal filed by Numaligarh Refinery Ltd (NRL) and ordered demolition of the entire 2.2 km boundary wall blocking an elephant migration corridor in Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat.

The apex court said that “Elephants have first right on forest”.

The wall became the eye of a storm in 2015 after a 7-year-old male elephant that had reportedly died of “severe haemorrhage” in May that year from violently thrusting against the wall.

The same year, environmentalists captured videos showing elephants trying to cross the high boundary wall.

The green crusaders then started demanding demolition of the wall built by the oil refinery. It was alleged that the wall and the refinery township were being built illegally in a “No Development Zone” declared by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF) in 1996.

In August 2016, the National Green Tribunal (NGT) ordered NRL to demolish the entire length of the wall within a month. But only a 289-metre stretch was demolished.

As per reports, the NRL challenged the NGT order, saying the entire wall need not be demolished as it is not a part of Deopahar Reserve Forest in Golaghat.

Gauhati High Court has stayed any further demolition of the Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL) boundary wall as ordered by the National Green Tribunal (NGT) last month.

The NRL claimed it had paid Rs 25 lakh to the State Forest Department, which will be kept in a separate bank account for restoration of the area and for the improvement of the surroundings adjoining the NRL complex and to reduce man-animal conflict especially man-elephant conflict.

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https://nenow.in/north-east-news/assam-sc-orders-demolition-of-nrl-boundary-wall-for-elephants.html

429 Elephants Killed in India in Past 10 Years By Poachers


In the last 10 years, India has been witness to the loss of a huge number of elephants killed. In fact, the number is as huge as 429 and they have all been lost to poaching, the Government of India has revealed. The government has responded to a RTI (Right to Information) question to the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau, which comes under the Ministry of Environment and Forests. The wildlife agency has further said that during this exact period, as many as 642 poachers had been apprehended from the various parts of the country for the elephants killed.

The RTI query was filed by Ranjan Tomar, who is a Noida based lawyer. He sought state wise data about the total number of elephants that have been slaughtered by poachers in the past 10 years along with information on the number of offenders arrested. The data also showed that the state, in which the highest number of elephants was killed during the period, was Kerala at 136.

The are several other states which showed a high number of elephants that were killed and they are as follows: West Bengal, 48; Karnataka, 46; Tamil Nadu, 44; and Odisha, 41. However, the good news is that there are states where not a single pachyderm was neutralized. The list of those states is as follows: Bihar, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Sikkim, Punjab, Telangana, Daman and Diu; and Dadra and Nagar Haveli for the time period that we have been talking about. On the other hand, Tripura registered just one elephant killing due to the poachers.

The government information also shows the number of pachyderms poached has come down sharply in the past 10 years from 53 in the year 2008 to just 5 in the year 2018. All 5 elephants killed were reported from the Indian state of Assam. The information comes with the welcome news that the total number of elephants killed by the poacher community has been gradually coming down. This is especially true for the past 4 to 5 years.

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http://greenubuntu.com/429-elephants-killed-in-india-in-past-10-years-by-poachers/

Ownership Certificate for captive elephants


Dimapur, January 18 (MExN): The Supreme Court, New Delhi in its order dated November 1 2018, in the matter of Writ Petition– Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre and others and Union of India has directed all the Chief Wildlife Wardens of the country to grant provisional Ownership Certificate for captive elephants after following the mandatory procedures required by law.

Satya Prakash Tripathi Chief Wildlife Warden, Nagaland, Dimapur in a press release has informed all the owners of captive elephants to collect application for ownership Certificate for captive elephants with effect from January 21 to 25 during office hours – 9:30 am to 4:00 pm.

Contact person – Kenlumtatei, Forest Range Officer (9612024423) and Aaron Yimchunger, Forest Range Officer (9612408797). Completed applications are to be submitted to this office, latest by 12:00 pm of January 28 for issuing provisional certificate, after examining the application.

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http://morungexpress.com/ownership-certificate-for-captive-elephants/